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Full text of "Electric Railway Journal"

From the collection of the 



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R .-.^^ 



JTrellnger 
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ibrary 



San Francisco. California 
2007 



DISCARD 



Electric Railway 
Journal 



X V^^ 



Volume XLV 

January to June^ 1915 



McGraw Publishing Company, Inc. 

239 West 39th St., New York City 



''Mc. 



Instructions for Use of Index 



This index is essentially a subject index, 
not an index of titles, and articles treating a 
number of different subjects are indexed un- 
der each subject. In addition, a geographical 
reference is published wherever the article 
relates to any particular railway company. 
The geoeraphical method of grouping serves 
to locate in the index any article descriptive 
of practices, conditions, events, etc., when the 
searcher knows the name of the electric 
railway to which the article refers. Group- 
ings are made under the names of the city 
in which the main office of the company is 
located, and cross references are given for 
the names of the railways, which appear in 
alphabetical order. An exception is made in 
the case of electrified sections of steam rail- 
roads, such entries being made direct under 
the name of the railroad. 



In the subject index, the alphabetical 
method is followed, and if there is a choice 
of two or three keywords the one most gen- 
erally used has been selected, cross refer- 
ences being supplied. Below will be found a 
list of the more common keywords used in 
the index. This list has been subdivided for 
convenience into sixteen general subjects, but 
the general subject headings, shown in capi- 
tal letters, do not appear in the body of the 
index. As an example, if a reader wished to 
locate an article on power-driven motor 
trucks he would obviously look in the list 
under the general subject "vehicles," and of 
the four keywords that appear under this 
only "Commercial Vehicles" could apply to 
the article in question. The reader would 
therefore refer to this keyword under "C" 
in the body of the index. 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF KEYWORDS 



ACCIDENTS AND LEGAL 

Accidents (including wrecks) 

Accident claim department 

Legislation 

Legal 

Public service commissions 

Public service corporations 

CARS 

Car design 
Cars (descriptive) 
Cleaning of cars 
Gasoline cars 
Lubrication 
Heating of cars 
Lighting of cars 
Storage battery cars 
Tower cars 
Ventilation of cars 
Work cars 
Wrecking cars 

CAR EQUIPMENT 
Axles 
Bearings 
Brakes, air 

Controllers and wiring 
(Couplers 

Current-collection 
Fenders and wheel guards 
Gears and pinions 
Headlights 
Journals 
Motors 
Trucks, car 
Wheels 



EMPLOYEES 



Employees 
Strikes 



FARES 



Fare collection (including ap- 
paratus) 
Fares 

Freight rates 

Through routes and joint rates 
Tickets 
Transfers 

FINANCIAL AND STATISTICS 

Accounting 

Appraisal of railway property 

Financial 



Franchises 

Maps 

Operating records and costs 

Statistics 

Traffic investigations, cities 

HEAVY ELECTRIC TRACTION 

Heavy electric traction 
High tension d.c. railways 
Interurban railways 
Locomotives 
Single-phase railways 

MAINTENANCE OF EQUIP- 
MENT 

Cleaning of cars 
Inspection of cars 
Maintenance records and costs 
Paints and painting 
Repair shop equipment 
Repair shop practice 
Repair shops 
Tests of equipment 
Washing of cars 
Welding, special methods 

OPERATION 

Dispatching trains 

Multiple-unit trains 

Operating records and costs 

Passenger handling records 

Rules 

Schedules and time tables 

Signals 

Stopping of cars 

Telephones 

Trailer operation 

Yards 

POWER 

Boilers and equipment 

Cables 

(jatenary construction 

C^onverters 

Energy consumption 

Overhead construction 

Poles 

Power distribution 

Power generation 

Power stations 

Purchased power 

Storage batteries 

Substations 



Transmission lines 

Trolley wire 

Turbo-generators and equipment 

RECORDS 

Maintenance records and costs 
Operating records and costs 
Passenger handling records 
Record forms 

STRUCTURES 

Bridges 

Carhouses 

Freight stations 

Power stations 

Repair shops 

Terminal stations and terminals 

Waiting stations 

TRACK 

Pavement 

Rail Joints and bonds 

Rails 

Ties 

Track construction 

Track maintenance 

TRAFFIC 

Advertising 

Preig'-it and express 

Parks and pleasure resorts 

Public, relations with 

Publicity 

Routing of Cars 

Signs on cars 

Traffic investigations, cities 

VEHICLES (not on tracks) 

Commercial vehicles 
Motor buses 

Service and tower wagons 
Trackless trolleys 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Fire protection and insurance 

Lightning 

Loading limits for cars 

Municipal ownership 

Organiation charts 

Public, relations with 

Standardization 

Storerooms 

Timber preservation 



In addition to the groups of articles cov- 
ered by these headings the papers and re- 
ports from_ railway associations and tech- 
nical societies are grouped under the names 
of the various organizations. Proceedings of 
other associations are indexed only in accord- 
ance with the subject discussed. The heading 
"Cars" includes all extended descriptions of 
individual types of cars, but short accounts 
of cars displaying no important innovations 
appear only under the name of the railway to 



which they apply. Under the headings 
"Financial and "Statistics" appear all ar- 
ticles relating generally to capitalization, 
earnings and operating costs, as distin- 
guished from the detailed and highly sub- 
divided figures that are entered under "Oper- 
ating Records and Costs." Short descriptions 
of machine tools appear only under the head- 
ing "Repair Shop Equipment" and are not 
indexed alphabetically, because of the wide 
choice in most cases of the proper keyword. 



January-June, 1915.] 



INDEX. 



Ill 



INDEX TO VOLUME XLV 



Jan. 9 


Jan. 16 


Jan. 23 


Jan. 30 


Feb. 6 


Feb. 13 


Feb. 20 


Feb. 27 


March 6 


March 13 

March 27 

April 3 


April 10 


April 17 


April 24 


May 1 


May 8 


May 15 


May 22 


May 29 


June 5 


June 12 


June 19 


June 26 



PAGES BY WEEKS 

1 to 82 

83 to 124 

125 to 164 

165 to 210 

211 to 264 

265 to 316 

317 to 360 

361 to 404 

405 to 446 

447 to 492 

493 to 538 

539 to 610 

611 to 656 

657 to 698 

699 to 740 

741 to 782 

783 to 824 

825 to 868 

869 to 916 

917 to 966 

967 to 1012 

1013 to 1054 

1055 to 1098 

1099 to 1140 

1141 to 1188 

1189 to 1230 



Accident claim department: 

Attorney's view of tlie accident question 

[Hoover], 461 

Automobile accidents, Handling [Mills], 1203 

Ruling on accident reports. Interstate Com- 
merce Commission, 883 

Prevention of Accidents: 

Accident savings divided, 818 

Boston Elevated Ry., 281; Record, 399 

"Brass Band in Safety Movement," 658 

[Brush], c845 
Instruction of employees, Effect upon 

accident record. New York State 

Rys. [Lawson], 367 
Insull traction lines. Best "safety-first" 

design, 99 
Kentucky Traction & Terminal Co. 

[Bacon], c *292 
Machine guards in Milwaukee Elec. Ry. 

shops, *756 
Making safety movement permanent 

[Schpeider], [Scott], 800 
Montreal, Safety first savings, 165 
Moving pictures, 36 
Moving pictures of Public Service Co. 

N. T., '98 
National electrical safety rules, pre- 
liminary edition, 750 
Newspaper advertising, 39 
Northern Ohio Traction & Light Co , 

282, *332 
Publicity for Safety-First Movement, 

c 717 
Public Service Ry., 282 
Relation, accidents to length of service. 

Bay State Street Ry., *709 
Results of safety work [George], 794 
Safe method of cutting concrete pave- 
ment [McKelway], *993 
Safety [Webster], 458; Discussion, 455 
Safety methods of various companies. 

Award of Brady medal, *239, 281; 

Comment, 211 
Safety rule book of Chicago Elevated 

Ry., Comment. 83 
Safetv-first movement: 

Chicago & Joliet Electric Railway, 
934 

In Chicago [Brownell], 749 

In Manila, 1120 

Organized Safety [Palmer], 936 

Review of work done by railways, 
34 

Room for intelligent study, 1100 

Safety leagues, 38 

Safety work [Elliott], S7 

Too much publicity given, 658 
School children, parents and teachers. 

Talks to, in various cities, 35 
Stevens bill in Congress, 252 
Accidents: 
Akron, Ohio, 206 



Accidents: (Continued) 

Damaged autos repaired in railway's shops, 

972 

Detroit, for 1914, 356 

Detroit United Ry., 205 

Grade crossing accidents. Possibility of re- 
ducing, 407 

Graphic comparisons [Dana], *58 

Important grade crossing, for 1914, 259 

Interstate Commerce Commission bulletin. 

348 

Milwaukee shops, classiiication, 756 

Montana Railroad Commissioner's report. 

685 

New York City, November, 119 

New York State, and New Jersey, 311, 605. 

1008 

Operating over broken water main in New 

York, *1211 

Subway accident in New York City. Short- 
circuit in high-tension cables, 95; Com- 
ment, 85 

Third Avenue R. R., New York, 1913-1914. 

296 

.Accountants' Association: 

Committees: 630 

Education correspondence course pro- 
gress, 630 
Education, Meetings, 589, 630 
Standard classification of accounts. Meet- 
ing, 293 

-Accounting: 

Analyzing the balance sheet [Hixson], 1112 

Electric light & power [Small], 1113 

Progress in 1914, 9 

.Accounting and mechanical departments. Rela- 
tion between, [Hemming], 1153 

.Advertising: 

Railroads, Comments, 1013, 1043 

.Safety-first campaigns, *39 

Syndicated anti-railway news, *462; Com- 
ment, 449; [Waters], c 586 

-Akron, Ohio: 

Jitney Bus, 650 

Northern Ohio Traction & Light Co.: 

Accidents for 1914, 206 

Accident prevention work, 282, ♦332 

Annual report, 1002 

Parcel checking, 533 

Albany, N. Y.: 

Albany Southern R. R.r 

Annual Report, 527 

United Traction Co.: 

Hearing on improvements, 206 
Service hearing, 1048 
Service order, 156. 260, 951. 1007 
Stepless car experiment, 1049 

Alberta, Can.ida : 

Public Utilities Commission, Creation, 1088 

Alexandria, La. : 

Southern Traction & Power Co. : 

Offer to sell city properly. 1177 
Service abandoned, 1088; Recommenced, 
1219 

Allentown, Pa. : 

Lehigh Valley Transit Co.: 

Annual report, 306 

Brackets for carrying lifting jack under 

side sill [Branson!. *I91 
Trolley wire pick-un [Branson]. *295 

American Cities Co. (See New York City) 

American Electric Railway Accountants' Asso- 
ciation (See Accountants' .Association) 

American Electric Railway Asssociation: 

Code (See Code of principles) 

Committees : 

Appointments for 1915, 139 
Appointments for all associations, 1914- 

1915, 59 
Brady medal. Report, "239, 281 ; Com- 
ment, 211 
Education, 61, 101, 317. 889 
Executive, Meetmg, 240, 938 
Line construction (See National Joint 

Committee) 
Motor vehicle, appointment, 418; Meet- 
ing, 589; Report, 619; Comment, 
612 
Public relations. Meeting, 240 
Sectional nssociations. Meeting, 139 
Subjects, Meeting, 241 
Valuation,^ Meeting, 101 

Company Sections: 

Chicigo, 796, 1075 

Denver. Meeting, 293, 418, 798, 1033, 

1210 
Initiative. 699 
Manila, P. I.. 337, 380, 673, 798, 1033, 

1211; Officers, *5in 
Milwaukee, Meetings, 380, 418, 673, 986; 

Officers, *100 
Newark. Meetings, 380. 418. 759, 986, 
1211; Officers, *100; Program, 337 
Pamphlet on advantai-es. 338 
Practical experience [Whitney], c511 
Programs for winter work. 1 
Washington. Meetings, 419, 713, 759, 
798, 889, 1033 

Convention plans, 889, 938 

Mid-vear meeting: 

Banonet, Addre^^es n* FPeirce. Sherlev, 
Montague, Henry], 219; [Allen], 280 



American Electric Railway Association: 
— Mid-year meeting (Continued) 

President Wilson's address, 217, 275; 
Comments of the press, 278; Opin- 
ions [Shonls, Williams, Budd, Clark, 
Cummings], c290 
Plans for, 61, 100, 139, 187 
Proceedings, 214, 219, 220, 223, 275, 280 
Purpose of, 126 
Spirit of the meeting, 211, 266 

New headquarters, 1033, *1075 

New York office. Activity, comments, 611 

President Allen un publicity, 632 

Proceedings issued, 589 

■ Success of reorganized association, 166 

Work of [Brush], 460 

American Electric Railway Claims Association: 

(See Claims Association) 
American Electric Railway Engineering Associa- 
tion: 

Committees : 

Accounting, Meeting, 379 

Block signals. Meeting, 139, 293 

Electrolysis, Meeting, 889 

Equipment, Meetings, 241, 798, 986, 1032 

Lightning protection, 101, 630 

Power distribution, Meetings, 293, 510, 

713, 889, 938, 986 
Power generation, Meetings, 241, 986, 

1032 
Standards, Meeting, 241 
Transportation-engineering, Meeting, 418 
Way matters. Meeting, 418, 1210 
American Electric Railway Manufacturers' Asso- 
ciation: 

Committee meetings, 380 

Convention plans, 188, 510 

Dues reduced, 510; (Comment, 493 

American Electric Railway Transportation and 
Traffic Association: 

Committees : 

Block signals, Meeting, 139, 293, 589. 

713 
Claims, Joint committee, Meeting, 759 
Fares and transfers. Meeting, 798 
Passenger traffic, Data circular, 379; 

Meetings, 139, 798 
Rules. Meeting, 379, 1075 
Sched_ules and time tables. Meeting. 759 
Training of employees. Meetings, 630, 

713; Data sheet, 337 
Transportation-engineering, Meeting, 418 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers: 

Midwinter convention, 369, 378 

Status of the engineer. Discussion on, 37S; 

Comment, 361 
American Public Utilities Co. (See Grand Rapids. 

Mich.) 
American Railway Association: 

Spring session, 985 

American Railways Co. (See Philadelphia, Pa.) 
American Railway Engineering Association: 

Convention proceedings, 570, 629 

American^ Railway Master Mechanics' Associa- 
tion : 

Convention, 1115; Comment, 1099; Exhibits, 

1117 
— — Plans for annual meeting, 137 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers: 

Boiler code approved, 377 

Chicago meeting. Heavy electric traction dis- 
cussion [Batchelder, Goss], 982 
American Telephone & Telegraph (Company; 

Annual report. Comments, 613 

American Wood Preservers' .Association; 

Annual convention, 181, 237 

.Anderson, Ind.: 

Union Traction Co. : 

Copper zone fare system, 310; Report. 

652 
Flange-bearing special work [Mitchell], 

1119 
New publication, 820 
Note issue, 1005 
Annapolis Short Line: 

■ Conversion from 6600-volt sinele-phase to 

1200-volt d.c. operation without inter- 
ruption of service, *542 

Use of ampere-hour meters, *722 

Appraisal of railway property: 

Chicago elevated railways, 110 

Cincinnati Traction Co., 391 

Detroit United Railway, 198 

Federal valuation conference in Washing- 
ton, 509 

Ohio, Divergent views on valuation matters, 

253 

Omaha & Council Bluffs Street Ry., 252 

Utility appraisals [Saunders], 984 

Washington & Maryland Ry., Reproduction 

costs and added percentages allowed by 
commission, 732 
Argentine Republic: 

Buenos Aires, Effect of war, 345 

Central Argentine Railway: 

High tension d.c. tap-field motors, ^679 

New railroad planned, 985 

Arkansas Association of Public Utility Operators: 

Jitney discussed by President, 1023 

Association of Technical Society Secretaries, 
Meeting, 419 



(Abbreviations: *Illustrated. c Correspondence.) 



IV 



INDEX. 



[Vol. XLV. 



Atlanta, Ga. : 

Georgia Railway & Power Company : 

Annual Report, 905 

Passes discontinued, 158 

Publicity work. 111 

Schedule reduction, "?! 

Seating capacity, Decision by State 
Railroad Commission, 354 
Atlantic Shore Electric Ry. (See Sanford, Me.) 
Augusta, Ga.: 
Augusta-Aiken (Ga.) Railway & Electric Co.: 

Fare increase, 1050 

Fare matters, 71, 118, 159 
Aurora, Elgin & Chicago R. R. (See Wheaton, 

111.) 
Australia; 
Melbourne : 

Plan to replace cable by electricity, 597 
Austin, Texas: 

Flood accident, "978 

Austria: 

V'ienna Municipal Tramways: 

Motor buses, *49, *51 

Snow removal with trailer wagons. Car 
scraper practice [Spangler], *591 

Wagons hauled by trolley cars, 637 
Vienna-Pressburg single-phase railway [See- 

fehlner], *628; Comments [Archbold], 

[Harte], c 989 
Auto buses (See Jitney bus, See Motor buses) 
Automobile industry an-J its effect on the inter- 
urban railway, 448 



B 



Bakersfield, Cal. : 

San Joaquin Light & Power Corporation: 

Bond issue, 1004 
:, Is free handling a traffic error? 
[Laney], 412; Discussion, 411; Com- 
ment, 405 

Balance weight system in San Francisco, *977 

Ball bearings on storage battery cars [Farr], 
*344 

Baltimore, Md. 

United Railways & Electric Co.: 

Annual Report, 857 

Cars, Prepayment, with fully inclosed 

platform, *86 
Maintenance costs — Reducing by proper 
handling of equipment [Leon- 
hauser], 384; Comment, 406 
Pension system. Results for one year, 
172 

Washington, Baltimore & Annapolis Electric 

Railroad; 

Annual report, 1045 

Bangor (Me.) Railway & Electric Co., Bond 
issue, 199 

Barre & Montpelier Traction & Power Co., (See 
Montpelier, Vt.) 

Baton Rouge, La. : 

• Baton Rouge Electric Co., Note issue, 815 

Bay State Street Ry. (See Boston, Mass.) 

Bearings: 

• Motor-axle, choice of different metals 

[Vulcanl. 760 

Motor-axle, Home-made cast-iron [Lewis]. 

•760 

Tri-City Railway shop practice [Suther- 
land], '944 

Berkshire Street Ry. (See Pittsfield, Mass.) 

Berlin (See Germany) 

Binghamton (N. Y.) Rys. : 

Annual report, 482 

Birmingham, Ala.: 

Birmingham, Ensley & Bessemer Ry., Re- 
ceivership, 437 

Birmingham-Tuscaloosa Railway & Utilities Co. 
(See Tuscaloosa, Ala.) 

Boilers and Efiuipment: 

Plant of Havana Electric Railway, Light & 

Power Co. [Ricker], *920 

— — Rational unit for rating of, 363 

Rational units for the boiler room [Stott], 

c 468; Comment, 447 

Standard specifications for viesign and con- 
struction, American Society of Me- 
chanical Engineers, 377 

Use of powdered coal. Comments, 1014 

Boise, Idaho: 

Idaho-Oregon Lt. & Pr. Co. 

Reorganization, 772 
Foreclosure decree, 907 

Jitney bus ordinance, 397 

Boston, Mass. : 

.Ambulance chaser fined, 356 

Bay State Street Ry.; 

Wage arbitration, 76, 150, 200, 268, 303, 
346, 433, 477, 708, 854, '1019, 1205; 
Comments, 870, 1190; [Richeyl, 
c 758 
Chemical engineering practice, 90; Com- 
ment, 84 

Bill providing for replacement of Charlestown 

elevated line by subway, 857 

Boston Elevated Ry. 

Cars, Center-entrance trailer, *99, *1154 
Complaint handling, 26 
Dispatching cars [Dana], *802 
Safety methods, 281 
.Safety record, 399 

Zone system of fares considered [Ban- 
croft], c 890. 

Cambridge subway extension, 113 

Massachusetts Electric Companies, Annual 

report, 254 



Boston, Mass.; (Continued) 

Report of public service commission, 809 

Suggested 6-cent fare. Comments on, 783 

Toll charge abolished for East Boston tun- 
nel, 686 

Transfer charge, 77 

. — — Transportation bills, 433 

. West End Street Railway 

Common stock issue, 647, 732 

Boston & Worcester Street Railway; 

Tie treating plant, *678 
Bra-Jy safety medal, .\ward of, *239, 281; Com- 
ment, 211; Presentation, 338 
Brakes : 

Brake shoe report by M. C. B. committee, 

1163 

Clasp brakes, report by M. C. B. committee, 

1163 

Electric, [Sprague], cl076 

Electric regeneration from direct current 

motors. Comment, 918 

New York Municipal Railway cars, *872 

Brakes, Hand: 

— — Light-weight geared (National Brake Co.), 

*517 
Braking, Regenerative (See Energy consump- 
tion) 
Brantford, Ont.r 
— — Municipal operation prevented by lack of 

legal authority, 597 
Brill Co., J. G., Annual report, 393 
British (Jolumbia Electric Ry. (See Vancouver, 

B. C.) 
Frookfield, Mass.: 

Warren Brookfield & Spencer Street Rail- 
way, Sale, 773 
Brooklyn, N. Y. : 
— — Brooklyn Rapid Transit Co. : 

.Advertising contract terminated, 912 
Advertising to be managed by railway, 

1007, 1227 
Attaching signal wires to third-rail 

fMcKelway], *1038 
Car-full signs, 552 
Complaint handling, 26 
Cutting concrete, safely [McKelway], 

*993 
Derailments from worn flanges [Will- 
iams], "1037 
Elevated lines and. the depreciation of 

property va'ue [Williams], 71 
Employees, Welfare work for, 454 
Fender controversy, 827, 1220 
Folding box to guard public against 

welding arc [Williams], 847 
Garment dryer, Electric [Shannon], 

*300 
Insurance, 435 
Mysterious derailments [Williams], 

1078 
New cars. Sea Beach Line, 651 
New subway opened, 1218 
Objection to order for new route, 400 
Pine ties reused after service of 21 

years [Cram], 295 
Publicity pamphlets, 205 
Pump for manholes. Power-driven drain- 

ase, '247 
Rail life on curves. Comparison of 
open-hearth and manganese steel 
[Bernard], 383 
Safety report for employes, *n96 
Service hearings, 108, 158, 532 
Splice ears in overhead construction, 

1041 
Submarine cable installation, *805 
Track tools, supplies and appliances 

[Cram], 1169 
Warning signs to protect new paving 
work [Cram], •893 

Marginal railroad bill signed, 1088 

New York Municipal Railways. (See New 

York City) 

Speed control for subway, 72 

. — —Transfer order, 356 

BufTalo, N. Y.: . „ „ 

BufTalo & Lake Erie Traction Co., Fare 

increase, 119 

International Traction Co., Annual report, 

1131 

Historical sketch of street ar^J electric rail- 
way development [Dickson], 135 

International Railway: 

Buffalo-Niagara Falls line, 302 
Capitalization, Elimination of excess, 

153 
Complaints in legal form, 399 
Construction improvements, 251 
Fare changes, 441 
Traffic decrease, 260 

Service matters, 206 

Buffalo, Lockport X- Rochester Ry. (See Roch- 
ester, N. Y.) 
Business Conditions: 

. fHeuIings] 1131 

— —"Buy it now" movement, 267 

Electric railwav conditions on Tan. 1, 1915,7 

Growing confidence [Byllesby], 350 

Northwest, Outlook in, 152 

. Prediction of prosperitv, 152 

President Wilson's address at meeting of 

.American Electric Railway Association, 

217. 275 , ,,.,., 

Railwavs and the manufacturers [Tripp], 

Regulation, Commen*s. 613 

Report of TTnlted States Chamber of Com- 
merce. *95 
Stock market. Comments, 741 

(Abbreviations: ♦Illustrated, c Correspondence.) 



Business Conditions: (Continued) 

Unprecedented opportunities [Farrell], 350 

Business courtesy. Reprehensible practice of 

buyers and sellers, 406 
Butte, Mont.: 
Butte Electric Railway, Default on bonds, 

688 
Butte, Anaconda & Pacific R.R.: 
• Experiences with 2400-voU locomotives 

[Cox], 136 



c715 



Cab signals (See Signals) 

Cable Cars ' 

Grip for two-car train. United Railroads, 

San Francisco, *977 
Cable connectors. Mechanical [Fargo], *1216 
Cable fault localizer. Portable (Westinghouse), 

*387 
Calgary, Can. : 

Municipal Railway finances, 597 

California Railroad t-ommission: 

Pill for regulating public utilities, 253 

Members, 151 

Camden, N. J.; 

Interstate Railways: 

Earnings and expenses for 1914, 1004 

Stock conversion plan, 731, 956 
Canada: . . 

Commercial and industrial cou-ditions, 883 

Electric railway earnings for 1914, 1179 

Proposals for new lines, 768 

Track built in 1914, 14; Comment, 12 

Canton, Mass.: 

Blue Hill Street Railway: 

Adjustable stand for forge shop, 997 

Fare increase hearing, 863 

Increase in fares, 604; suspended, 1226 
Carbon brush troubles, [Martindale], 571 
Car Design: , . , , ,„, 

Advantages of single-trucks, 406 

All-steel cars for Eric, 1102 

Baltimore prepayment cars, *86 

Collision results, 568; [Keen], 

— — Equipment, Progress in, 2 

New Orleans all-steel car, *271 

Progress in 1914, 11 ,.,.,.■.„ 

Seat space per passenger established in Wew 

York City, 1094 , ,, rr i 
Small cars. Advantages of, 967; [Layng], 

979; [Wilson], cl206; ["Railway Oper- 
ator"], 1207 ^ „ 
Steel cars. Growth in the use of all-steel 

construction, 3 , „ c. 
Steel cars, Chicago Elevated Ry., Stress 

analysis [ Rettger and George], c 291 
Car-door operation, Santa Barbara center-entrance 

car [Llovd], *590 . 

Car propulsion (See Energy consumption) 
Car Steps: „ _^_ 

Lighting, New York State Rys., 247 

Lower steps in New Hampshire, 119, 260 

Carhouses: 

Evanston, III., Railway, *660 

Feeder panel for trolley wires, l21t 

Fire protection, Springfield (Uhio) Ky., 

Holyoke Street Railway Company, *930 

Municipal Railroad, San Francisco, 667 

. Seattle Municipal Ry. [Kennedy], '513 

Springfield (Ohio) Ry., '556 

Vancouver, B. C, Fireproof construction, 

*227 

All-service, East Liverpool Traction & Light 

Co. [Niles], *765 
Ambulance cars. Trier, Germany [EichelJ, 

*831 
Baltimore, Prepayment with fully-inclosed 

platform, *86 
Center entrance: 

Annapolis Short Line, *547 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa., *518. *593 

Double-deck, ffont-exit, Glasgow, 297 

Dump cars, Two-wav (Universal), 299 

-^Express for Detroit United Railway [Keller], 

•848 

Fire-fighting, Duluth, *472 ^, , , „ 

Front-entrance, center-exit, Cleveland, Ky.. 

'364 
— — Hospital, Germany, '50 t. -i j 
Jamestown, Wesffield & Northern Railroad, 

Light-weight (34-ton, 56-ft.) for Toledo, Fos- 

toria & Findlay Railway. '947 

Low-floor, California tvpe. United Railroads 

of San Francisco, •lOie 

New York Municipal Ry., Motors, control, 

conduit and collectors, ^496 

One-man, Winona Ry. [Howard], 233; Com- 
ment, 212 , „ ,,. c . 

Open, steel-underframe, for Public Service 

Railway, "1171 

Salt Lake JSr Utah Ry., '54 

Semi-steel for Kansas City, Metropolitan 

Street Railway, *850 

Statistics of cars ordered in 1914, 16; Com- 
ment, 1 2 

Steel ; 

Erie Railroad. 1102; Comment, 1100 
Long Island R.R. Ten vears' ex|)erience, 

•566; Comment, 539 
New Orleans, ^270; Comment. 275 
Parlor cars for Waterloo-Cedar Rapids, 
•932 

Three-in-one for repair service [Sherwood], 

•1121 



January-June, 1915.] 



INDEX. 



Ry., Center-entrai.ee, 



Associa- 



Cars: (Continued) 

Trailers: 

Boston Elevated 
•99, *1154 
Catenary construction: 

Annapolis Short Line, *543 

Flexible instead of rigid overhead work, 

Michigan Railway's 2400volt line. Through 

towns, 'IH? ,,nAC 

Norfolk & Western Railroad, 1065 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa: 

Iowa Railway & Light Company: 

Improvements, m equipment, »5b 

Census report on electric railways, statistics on 
cars, traffic, capitalization, income, oper- 
ating expenses, taxes, operating ratio 
and employees, 96, 131 

Central Electric Railway, Accountants 
tion. 

Convention, 411, 1112, 1151 

Central Electric Railway Association: 

Committees, membership of, /90 

Convention: 

Boat trip, 1162, 1201 
Papers, 1156, 1201 
Proceedings, 455 

Secretary-treasurer's report, INeereamerJ, 

413 . . 

Central Electric Traffic Association: 

-—Annual report of chairman [Neereamer], 

Chamber of Commerce of United States, Annual 

meeting, 338 
Charles City, la.: . 
Charles City Western Radway, Electrifica- 
tion, 643 
Charlotte,- N. C. r- ■ , , i. 

Charlotte Electric Railway, Capital stock 

reduction, 1003 
__Piedmont & Northern Railway, Rotary con- 
verter equipment, 633 
Southern Public Utilities Co., Company pub- 
lication, 440 n „„ 
Chemical engineering, Bay State Street Ry.^ 90; 

Comment, 84 
Chemical laboratory of Illinois Traction System, 

[Beagle], 423 
Chicago, 111.: ,t ■.■ ■ r- 
Authority of Illinois Public Utilities Com- 
mission, 400 

Chicago City Railway: 

Annual Report, 645 

ChicasTO Elevated Railways: 

Alleged violation of utilities act, 599 

Bond issue, 689 

Bonds sold, 815 ,, „,, 

Collateral trust bonds sold, 815 

Examination of books, 728 

Field-coil impregnation, 640 

First-aid stations, 125 .,,„. 

Medical methods, [Fisher], *I192 

New publication, 952 

Preferred dividend passed, 529 

Repair shop practice, *551; Comment, 

540 
Safety rule book. Comment, 83 
Steel car. Stress analysis [ Rettger and 

George], c*291 
Stri'ke, *1165; Comment, 1142, 1189 
Valuations, 110 

Chicago Railways Co.: 

Expenditures, 112 

Chicago Surface Lines: 

Complaint handling, 26 
Earnings and expenses, 858 
Motor ventilation [Adams], c990 
Provision for minority stockholders in 

merger, 1003 .,,„, 

Rail wear B. O. S. E. report, •1195 
Report on opeiations distributed among 

employees, 825 
Safety-first work [Brownell], 749 
Service hearing, 486 
Service Ordinance, 532 
Strike, 1165; Comment, 1142, 1189 
Unification upheld by Court, 598 
Wage controversy, 952, 1043, 1087 

Elevated Club, Meeting, 468 

Loop track capacity reached, 399 

Manganese-steel crossing development, 

_ — Motor buses. Traction fund for, 348 

Ordinance violations, 305 . . . 

Report of Railway Terminal Commission, 

1150, Comment, 1141 

. Service matters before commission, 205 

. Service question, 76, 157, 486 

Service record chart, *366 

Signs, Destination, Legal suits 77 

Strike of all platform men, 1165; Comment 

1142 . 

Traction fund disposition, 305 

Traction ordinances, 72 

Traction situation. Politics, 126 

Transfer points, Suit to force new, 77 

Ventilating ordinance, 120 

Chicago, Lake Shore & South Bend Ry. 

Michigan City, Ind.) 
Chicago & Milwaukee Electric Railroad 

Ilighwood, 111.) 
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Ry. : 
Electrification of Great Falls (Mont.) ter- 
minal, *1172 

Line construction. Four-car platform, 934 

— — Locomotives, *I072 



1128 



•711 



(See 
(See 



Chicago & Northwestern Ry., Safety-first move- 
ment, 34 r. -, J /c 
Chicago, Harvard & Geneva Lake Railroad (bee 

Walworth, Wis.) 
Chicago, Ottawa & Peoria Ry. (See Ottawa, 111.) 
Chicago, South Bend & Northern Indiana Rail- 
way Co. (See South l!en-d, Ind.) 
Chicago Surface Lines (See Chicago, 111.) 
Chico, Cal.: 

Northern Electric Ry. : 

Finances, 114, 435 
Reorganization, 773 
Children's tickets in St. Louis, 260 
China: . 

Railless traction in Shanghai, b9i 

Cincinnati, Newport & Covington Railway (See 

C^ovington, Ky.) 
Cincinnati, O. : 

_ Cincinnati Traction Co. 

Appraisal, 391 
Line extension, 686 
Progress of valuation, 598 
Service complaints, 78 

Fare ease, 77 , 

Rearing on transit bill, 768 

Loop measure passed, 1043 

Ohio Electric Ry: . 

Baffle plate for motor axle bearing caps, 

[Fox], *424 ,,. . ,. , 

Franchises granted. Publicity methods, 

81 1 
Urbana franchise granted, 1220 

Ohio Traction Company: 

Decision in tax case, 1043 
Inventory controversy, 643 
Note issue, 773 . , . -j 

Plans for improved service through rapid 

transit board, 727 

Rapid transit belt-line project, 15Z 

Rapid Transit Commission, Work of 302 

Rapid transit developments, 250, 348 

Rapid transit plans involving use of canal 

bed. Report on [Swain, Schoepf], 108, 413 

Suburban franchise matters 110 

Transit measure approved by Senate, isi-! 

Circuit Breakers: ■ -n , - ^- •, 

Reclosing type (Automatic Reclosmg Circuit 

Breaker Co.), ^996 
Claims Association: 

Committees. 

Executive, Meeting, 293 
Cleaning Cars: . . . 

Practice in various cities, 513 

Use of broom, 625 

Cleburne, Texas: 

Cleburne Street Radway, Sale 955 

Cleveland. PainesviUe & Eastern Railroad (See 

Willoughby, Ohio) 
Cleveland, Ohio: 

.Mr tests in street cars, 533 . , ,,,„ 

-Charges against commissioner dismissed, ll^o 

Cleveland, Akron & Canton Ry.: 

Negotiations for right of way to Dres- 
den, O., 904 
Subway terms settled, 1220 

Cleveland Ry. : 

.\nnual report, 350 

Carhouse contract controversy, 999, 

1087 . , 

Cars, Front-entrance, center-exit, tor 

crosstown service, *364 
Extensions proposed, 855 
Fare matters, 304 

Injunction, 641 . 

Presed-steel motors (Westinghouse), 

•1041 
Prooerty holdings, 432 
Repair shops. New, '168: [Keen], c290 
Reiwrt for Nov., 1914, 71 
Rush-hour methods, 30 
Tax dispute, 198 
Wage adjustment, 962 
Wireless notice for steamer traffic, 399 

Cleveland Rapid Transit Ry. 

Grant approved, 72 „ , , „ ., 
ClevelaU'd, Southwestern & Columbus Rail- 
way : 

Annual Report, 1045 
Bonds extended, 815 
Bond issue, 955 . 

Home-made axle bearing, *760 
Reducing paint costs, 847 , 

Testing armature clearance [Lewis], 893 
Testing motors [Lewis], 1037 

Cleveland & Youngstown Ry. 

Freight terminal plans, 1176 
Franchise opposed, 1219 

Extension subsidized by benefited property 

owners, 951 

, Freight subwav ordinance, 1178 

——One-cent-tare line, 1178 

— ^Safety zones, 77 

Subway plans, 1087, 1129 

Clinton, la. . 

Iowa & Illinois Ry. , 

Freight service discontinued, /J6U 
Coasting Clocks (See Energy Consumption) _ 
Code of nrinciples adopted by American Electric 
Railwav Association [Harding J, C5» 

^Addr'esi""twllliams], 220; Discussions. 
' [Tripp, Brush], 214; Comment, 212 

—Changes suggested. Sliding scale of returns 
to capital discussed. Cooperation with 
public utility associations recommended 
[Crosby], 370; Comment, 362 



•22 



Coasting records of various railways, *706 
Columbus, Ohio: o t ■ u. 

Columbus Railway, Power & Light 

Courtesy watch fobs for employees. 
Earnings during 1914, 906 
Refunding mortgage, 772 
Savings accounts of employees, 119 
Sprinkler contract, 819 

Terminal proposals, 1088 

Collisions. Results from. 

All steel cars on Long Island Ry., 568 

Semi-steel cars on American Railways 

[Keen], '715 
Commercial Vehicles: 

Tractor and trailer truck, Kansas City. 516 

Company sections (See American Electric Rail- 
way -Association) 
Company section. Individualism of, 362 
Compensation law (See Employees, Insurance) 
Conduits, Under-water, Preventing condensation 
in, Sault Ste Marie, Mich. [Koppel], 
•296 
Connecticut Valley Street Ry. (See Greenfield, 

Mass.) 
Constitutional Convention in New York, Recom- 
mendations of engineers, 844 
Controllers and Wiring: , 
Blow-out coil defects [Squier], *591, 635, 

Block to protect controller switch blades, 

[Parsons], *386 

Control system for Belmont Tunnel, New 

York City, (Westinghouse), *764, (Gen- 
eral Electric), *1124 

Equipment defects [Squier], *102, *140, 

•242 

New York Municipal Ry. car, *499 

Repairing division plates [Parsons], 470 

Relay setting to secure uniform accelera- 
tion, [See], 761 ,r~ ■ -, 

Resistances, Effect of improper [CornngJ, 

c93 

Reverse drums and interlocking mechanism 

[Squier], *382 

Rheostatic losses, 287 , n ^ 

Starting-resistance calculations, [CoorsJ, 

•761 „ , , , ,,., 

^Time element in notching [Buck], c572 

Convention programs. Possibilities of improve- 
ment, 495 
Converters: , „ x. , t, -i 
Equipment, Piedmont S: Northern Railway, 

Phase, Norfolk & Western Railroad, •lOei, 

(Jomment, 1057 , ti j 

. Rating, continuous vs. nominal. 1 roposed 

revision of A. I. E. E. standardization 
rules, 1142; Comment, 1191 

—Annual report of Railway Bureau, 955 
Corrosion, Electrolytic (See Electrolysis) 
Corrosion test of pure iron and alloy steel, 11/5 
Cost figures. Giving publicitv to, 743 
Costs, value of publishing [Palmer], c 845 
Couplers: 

M C. B. experimental types, committee re- 

oort. 1164 o r- ■ 

Covington, Ky., Cincinnati, Newport & Covmg- 

Frandlise m'attcrs, 112, 389, 478, 768, 1000 

Crane, Steam-electric, for tunnel work on Michi- 
gan Central R. R., *437 
Creosote, Statistics of production, 332 
Cross arms (See Overhead construction) . 

Crossing protection. Warning signs ordered in 

New Hampshire, 1184 
Crossings, Track, A. R. E. A. report. 571 
Current collection: 
— —.Annapolis Short Line, *550 

Roller-Bearing trolley wheels (American 

Roller Bearing Co.). *966 

Self-lubricating and adjusting trolley wheel 

and harp, *516 

Trolley base, ball-bearing, (Trolley Supply 

Co.). *1082 ^, ,„ . , 

Curtain fixtures without pinch handles (Dayton), 

•298 
Curves (See Track construction) 

(.Also see Track maintenance. Rails, Lite 

of) 



Dallas, Tex.: 

Dallas Street Ry.: 

Welfare work [Meriwether], 1029 . 
Investig.ition of public service corporations 

planned, 1129 . 

Jitney bus operation and earnings, 884 

—Texas Traction Co.: 

Power purchased from Texas Power 8e 
Light Co., 1177 
Davenport, la.: . , . , ,- 
Tri-Citv Railway & Light Company 

Balanced door mechanism, [SutherlandJ, 
•1038 

Bearing practice [Sutherland], '944 

New publication, 912 

Return circuits [Skelly], 794 

Trouble board, [Sutherland], *1078 

— ^Oakwo'od Street Ry. holdings sold, 816 



(Abbreviations: 'Illustrated, c Correspondence.) 



VI 



Decatur, Ind.: 

Fort Wayne & Springfield Railway: 

Receiver's sale, 529, 1004 
Delaware & Hudson Railroad: 

Annual report, 771 

Denver, Colo. : 

Denver & Interurban Railroad: 

Trail cars oniered, 1136 

Denver Tramway Co.: 

Armature- room force, 1215 
Experience with coasting clocks, *705 
Company section, Meeting, 293, 418, 1210 
Complaint handling, 25 
Mating gears and pinions, [McAloney], 

c990 
Working hard gears with soft pinions, 
[McAloney], 803 
Depreciation, Based on par value in Nebraska, 

1143 
Des Moines, la.: 

Des Moines City Railway: 

Cause of thick and thin wheel flanges, 

[Lloyd], 1037 
Default of interest, 772 
Franchise matter, 198, 432 
Supplementary motor bus service sug- 
gested, 950; Comment, 917 
Wage increase, 605 

Hopeful outlook for franchise agreement, 

1128 

Jitney bus, 649 

Detroit, Mich.: 

Detroit United Ry.: 

Accidents in 1914, 205, 356 

Annual report, 436 

Arbitration agreement, 1043, 1087 

Freight contract, 1050 

Grinding machine for grids [Keller], 

*64 
Interchange decision with Mich. Cent. 

R.R., 532 
Locomotive and cars for freight service 

[Keller], *848 
Merit system suggested for employees, 

1176 
Purchase by city, negotiations, 304, 431, 

477, 523. 686, 725, 901, 1129, 1219 
Results of Safety work [George], 794 
Sale to city authorized, 686 
Strike, 951, 998; Comments, 969 
Temporary trail cars in operation, 961 
Tickets sold at Ford plant, 30 
Transfer suit decision, 440 
Valuations, 198 

Ordinance limiting car capacity, 604 

Traffic report by Barclay Parsons & Klapp, 

595, 664 
Diesel engine test, 639 
Dispatching Trains: 

Assignment board in Holyoke carhousc, 

*899 

By telephi*ne in city service. New York 

State Railways, Rochester [Strong], 885 

Methods in city service, Boston [Dana], 

802 
Door-operating mechanism, balanced [Suther- 
land], *1038 
Double trolley in Seattle, [Kennedy], *128 
Draft Equipment : 

Report at M. C. B. convention, 1163 

— ■ — (See also Couplers) 

Dual ownership in Alsace, 1217 

Dubuque, la. : 

Union Electric Co. 

Fibre conduit installation for feeder 

taps, *1125 
Soldering torch for commutators, 1079 
Duluth, Minn.: 

Duluth Street Rys. : 

Fire-fighting car, *472 
Franchise upheld by Supreme Court, 
346 

Duluth-Superior Traction Co. : 

Annual report, 954 
Dump cars (See Cars, Dump) 



Earnings, passenger-mile, Recorder for [Bon- 
ham], *948 

East Liverpool, Ohio: 

East Liverpool Traction & Light Co., All- 
service cars (Niles), *765 

Tri-State Electric & Railway Company, Re- 
ceiver's sale, 647 

Economies, minor, on small roads, 898 

Edmonton (Alta.) Municipal Electric Ry., Fare 
rates, 311 

Education; 

Corresi>ondence courses, American Electric 

Railway Association, 317 

English, Bettering the use of [Earle], c94; 

Comment. 83 

Educational institutions [Jackson], c93; Com- 
ment, 85 

Electric Railway Handbook, Review, 583 

Electric Railway Journal : 

At Panama-Pacific Exposition. 1155 

■ Brief for the railways, 1, 447 

Medal of honor awarded, 1141 

— — New railways. Misdirected letters to, 871 

Review of activities in 1914, 1 

Subjects of greatest interest indicated by 

subscribers. 52 

Electric railways, Functions of [Ralston^, 456; 
Comment, 447 



INDEX. 



Electrolysis: 

Causes of corrosion in water pipes and other 

underground structures [Cole], cl86 

Concrete poles, Effect of stray current, New 

York State Rys. [Throop], 294 

Corrosion of meials in natural soils [Rosa, 

McCoUum, Ganz, Waterman], c419 

Discussion [Gerbury], 581 

Joint committee of national associations, 

Progress, 84 
Springfield, Mass., report. Attitude of rail- 
way, 507 
Elevated Club of Chicago. Discussion of public 

relations, 759 
Elevated railroads and the depreciation in value 

of abutting property [Williams], 71 
El Paso, Tex. : 

El Paso Electric Railway: 

Cheapest car ride in the world, 1050 
Empire United Rys. (See Syracuse, N. Y.) 
Employees: 

.Advertisine influence of [Slater], 1029 

• Alien labor problem. New York City, 113 

Benefit association at Rockford, 111., 735 

■ Bonus system for Milwaukee Electric Ry. & 

Light Co., 1008 

Bulletins on courtesy, 23 

Comnensation bill; In Maine, 856; in New 

York, 642, 727, 753; In Pennsylvania 
[Reed], 980, 1130; Rulings in Ohio, 373 
Courtesy toward the public. Efforts on vari- 
ous railways, 20 

Education, Correspondence courses of 

American Electric Railway Association. 
317 

First-aid stations in Chicago, 125 

Group insurance policy, Kansas City, Clay 

County & St. Joseph Railway, 651 

Handlinn of men. 266 

Hours, Bills in Ohio Legislature, 392 

Human element in electric railway opera- 
tion [DeCamp], 1157 

Instruction methods. New York State Rys., 

Rochester, Effect on accident record 
[Lawson], 367 

Instructions, Motormen's rules, Baltimore. 

385 

New York legislation. 318, 390 

Wisconsin compensation law, 234 

Loans to small borrowers under Morris plan, 

687 

Motorman not entitled to engineer's pay. 

West Alameda, Cal., 356 
Non-unionism a basis of employment, Kan- 
sas decision, 266 

■ Ohio legislation, 149 

— — Opportunities in transportation [Bullock], 
454 

Pensions: 

Baltimore system, Results for one year, 

172 ' 

Newport News, 1183 
Twin City Rapid Transit Co., 118 

Physical examinations, Chicago Elevated Rys. 

[Fisher] »1192 
Policies of Pennsylvania Railroad, 950; Com- 
ments, 917 

Profit sharing by Washington Railway & 

Electric Co., 157 
Promotion by Civil Service on San Fran- 
cisco Municipal Railway, 533 

Re-examination, 407 

Reports from. Disciplinary value of, 125 

Review of conditions of 1914, 11 

Safety co-operation, *43 

Safety reports in Brooklyn, *1196 

Savings accounts. Columbus, Ohio. 119 

Service stripes, Manila Electric Railway & 

Light Company. 652 

Sharing facts with Chicago surface lines, 825 

"Skilled labor" of platform men, 268 

Training system on New York State Rail- 
ways, '704 

Training steam railroad men for electric 

operation, Pennsylvania Railroad [Rob- 
erts], *970; Comments, 968 

Wage adjustment, Cleveland Railway. 962 

Wage conferences, Springfield Street Rail- 
way, 1000 

Wage arbitration. Bay State Street Railway, 

76. 150, 708. 854, 1019, 1205; Comments, 
870, 1190; [Richey], c 758 

Wages: 

Conditions in steam railroad car build- 
ing, 1105 
Different industries. 726 
Little Rock. Ark., Increase, 159 
War time, 825 
Youngstown, O., Increase. 735 

Workinemen's compensation (See Employees 

— Compensation bill) 

Welfare measures [Welsh]. 841 

Welfare work in Dallas [Meriwether], 1029 

Welfare work, United Railways, St. Louis, 

693 
Energy consumption: 

Ampere-hour meters on Annapolis short line, 

*722 
Coasting recorders on Third Avenue Rail- 
way, *572; Comment, 541 

Coasting records. Northern Texas Traction, 

•1198 

Decreased with faster schedules, 869 

Effect^ of meters upon men [Koehler], c633 

Experience with coaster clocks in Denver, 

•705 

Increased power consumption of traction 

lines. Public Service Corporation, 1022 



[Vol. XLV. 

Energy Consumption: (Continued) 

Inertia effect of moving trains [Mc.Annix], 

c*714; Comment, 699, 825 
Regeneration and electric braking. Comment, 

Regeneration, Progress in, 495 

Regeneration on State Railways of Italy, 

451; Comment, 495 

g^K'^nerative braking, 1101; [Sprague], cl076 

Results with ampere-hour meters on cars, Chi- 
cago & Milwaukee Ry., *973 

Saving energy by improved methods of car 

design and operation [Storer], *286; 
Comment, 267 

Stop-recording device not needed [Koehler], 

c633 

• Tests in San Francisco, 1018 

Time element in controller notching [Buck], 

c672 

■ Use of meter records for comparisons of 

motormen, 405, 448 

Engineering considerations in a proposed line, 
c512 

Engineering Foundation, Inauguration of. 188 
237 

Engineers: 

Place in business, 212 

Status of. Discussion by American Insti- 
tute of Electrical Engineers, 378; Com- 
ment, 361 

England. (See Great Britain) 

Equipment defects [Squier], •102, •140, *242, 

Erie Railroad: 

All-steel cars. 

Express business. 
Evanston, 111.: 

Evanston Railway: 

Carhouse, *660 



1102 

(See Freight and express) 



Fare collection: 

Automatic registration [Rooke], c844 

Cash and ticket box (Dayton Fare Recorder 

Co.), "1081 
Collection and registration of city and in- 
terurban fares [Hewes], 466; Discussion, 
465 

Fare recorder. Computing (Dayton), *145 

Fare recorder showing passenger mile earn- 
ings [Bonham], *948 

Front-entrance, center-exit car, Cleveland 

Ry., 365 

Improved change carrier (McGill Ticket 

Punch Co.), *640 
Interurban fare register (New Haven Trol- 
ley Supply Co.), 593, 680 

New form of fare indicator and recorder 

(Dayton), 1173 
Fares: 

Augusta-Aiken Railway & Electric Corp., 

Increase allowed, 118 

Basis of rates to be the cost of service 

[Duncan], 457 

Copper zone extension in Indiana, 734, 777 

Copper zone fare system, Union Traction 

. Company of Indiana, 310 

Dividends and rate making. Comment, 701 

Higher fares and the wage earner, 918 

Illinois, Campaigning for increased passen- 
ger rates, 400 

Increase at Canton, Mass., 604 

Increase on Blue Hill Street Railway, Hear- 
ings, 863 

Los Angeles Railway wins lO-cent fare case, 

777 
Milwaukee, Commission rescinds low-fare or- 
der, 333 

North Dakota lignite case, Comment, 659 

Rate-making, responsibility for, 783 

Reduction, Vancouver, B. C, 959 

Report of Bureau of Fare Research on oper- 
ating revenues, 183 

Rochester 3-cent fare case, 117 

School fare bill in New York State, 391 

Springfield (Mo.) Gas & Elect. Co., 110 

West Virginia passenger case, 659 

Zone system [Bancroft], c890 

Zone system in Milwaukee [Stearns], '836; 

Comment, 825 
Fault localizer. (See Cable fault) 
Federal reserve system [Weeks], 222; [Morti- 
mer], 226 
Federal Trade Commission, Members, 434 
Feeders. (See Overhead construction) 
Fences: 

A. R. E. A. report, 570 

- — Spring posts (Carbo Steel Post Co.), *807 
Fender and wheel guards: 

Fenders for New York buses, 1000 

New type air-operated fender (American 

Automatic Fender Co.), *723 
Sandbox opened by fender trip. Third Ave- 
nue Ry. [Tohnson], *106 

Sheet-steel pilot, Chicago, Lake Shore & 

South Bend Ry., •106 
Ferromanganese and the European war, 581 
Ferryboat. Steel, Oakland, Antioch & Eastern 

Ry., '133 
Filing of technical literature [Arthur], c511 
Financial; 

Annual report of Public Service Commission. 

Washington, 528 
Bank holdings of public utility bonds, 306 



(Abbreviations: *Il!ustrated. c Correspondence.) 



January-June, 1915.] 



Financial: (Continued) 

Bureau of Fare Research: , , , . ., 

Comparison of steam and electric rail- 
way revenues, 183 

Comparison of electric railway revenues, 
bank clearings and building con- 
struction, 506 . 
Capitalization and financial operations ot 

electric railways, Census report, 130 

"Chilled capital" [Bennet], '843 

Declaring dividends out of surplus, 657 

Double liability for stockholders, 827 

Earnings of electric railway. Trend of, 269 

Equipment cost data, Worcester, Mass., 427 

Extensions of street railway tracks subsi- 
dized bv benefited property owners, 

Cleveland, 951 
Federal reserve system [Weeks], 222, 

[Mortimer], 226 „ j t t? . 
Increased rate of return allowed by East 

Linden Railway. 525 . , . • 
Interest rates on public utility bonds during 

the war and reconstruction period 

[Welsh], c 137 
Investment required per passenger, IM - 

Grath], "881; [Bradlee], c987; [Fen- 

stel], C1077; [Emery], clll9 
Iowa interurban railways. Annual report, 

292 
Massachusetts legal street railway bonds, 

154 

Moody review and forecast, 114 

. New York State, Securities for new con- 
struction, 393 

Ohio railway valuations, 193 

Probable revenue of new line, considera- 
tions [Mclntire], c799 „ , „ ■ ' ., 

Revenue increase for New York State rail- 
ways in 1914, 237 

Steam railroads in 1913, 289 

Supplementary financing, 1056 

Westinghouse conversion plan, 906 

Fire-fighting car at Duluth, *472 

Fire protection and insurance: 

Brooklvn Rapid Transit Co., 435 

Carhouse at Springfield, Ohio, 560 

Car-wiring code, changes, 285 

Hearing on fuses, Bureau of Standards, 1^15 

Precautions for Fourth of July, 1190 

Reducing the fire risk [Daniels], 329 

Fire Protection Association: 

^Convention. 936 

Carhouse, Boston & Worcester Street Ry., 

434 
Fitchburg, Mass.: 
Fitchburg & Leominster Street Railway: 

Making safety movement permanent 
[Bennett], c717 

Safety first campaign, 736 „ „ ,^ 

Fonda, Johnstown & GloverviUe R. R. (o=e 

Gloversville, N. Y.) 
Fort Wayne & Springfield Railway. (See De- 
catur, Ind.) 
Fort Wayne, Ind.: 
Fort Wayne & Northern Indiana Ry: 

Agricultural educational work, "712 
Fort Worth, Texas: 
Northern Texas Traction Co.: 

Coasting records, *1198 . 

Publicity campaign against jitneys, 1049 

Weed cutter [Griffiths], *1121 
Foxboro, Mass.: 
Norfolk & Bristol Street Railway: 

Fare hearing, 911 
France; 
Midi Railway: 

Catenary construction, 1040 

Franchises: 
Valuation : 

New Jersey Gas case, c57, 112, 199, 304, 
1177 
Frederick, Md. : 
■ Hagerstown & Frederick Ry. : . 

Demonstrations of "chilled capital 
[Bennett], *843 
Freipht and express: 

Car-load freight on small lines [Clark], 1114 

Discrimination against electric freight, 3 

Iowa & Illinois Ry., Service discontnued, 260 

Pittsburgh ordinance, 399 

Possibilities, 2 

Statistics of express companies in the United 

States, 323 
Freight cars. Restoring to side bearings on short 

curves [Hinman], *425 
Freight rates; 
Mahoning & Shenango Railway & Light Co., 

311 

• Ohio, 206 

Front-end conductors, 31 

Full crew laws. Opposition to, in Pennsylvania 

and New Jersey, 392 
Fuses, Proposed hearing on. Bureau of Standards, 

1215 



Garment dryer. Electric fShannonl, *300 
Gary, Hobart & Eastern Traction Co. (See Ho- 

bart, Ind.) 
Gas, Electric & Street Railway Association of 

Oklahoma : 
Convention, 983 



INDEX. 



Gasoline cars: 

Illinois Central R. R., 51 

Union Pacific R. R., *1215 

Gears and pinions: 

Heating apparatus, 638 

Installation and removal [Parsons], 674 

Method of removing IDalgleish], *942 

-Operation of hard gears and soft pinions 

[McAloney], *803, c990; [Cooper], 

c890; [Phillips], c891 

Removal of pinions [Ross], c800 

— Rethreading pinion-ends L Vulcan], 720 

Testing [Allen], *1201 

Use of gas flame in removing [Parsons], 

c988 

Wear of gears and pinions [Ross], 628 

General Electric Co.: 

Exhibit for San Francisco, 194 

New apparatus, 248 

Generators: 

Capacity of direct current [Lamme], 300 

Germany: 

— —Berlin railways, effect of war, 813 

Female conductors during war in Berlin, 

813 

Effect of war on traffic, 729 

Hospital cars, *50 

Purchase of Berlin Electric Works by city, 

859 
Railway and electrical conditions [EichelJ, 

345 
— — Silesian single phase electrification, *666 

Test of high»-tension direct current, 338 

Trier tramways, ambulance cars [Eichel], 

*831 

War revenues of tramways, 599 

Wendelstein Ry., 1500-volt d.c. line with 

regeneration and storage battery, 274 
Glasgow Corporation Tramways. (See Great 

Britain.) 
Gloversville, N. Y.: 
Fonda, Johnstown & Gloversville Railroad, 

Fare change, 159 
— — Workingmen's fare reduction, 1136 
Gongs, Foot [Reiter], *344 
Governors* messages, 146, 195 
Grand Rapids, Mich.: 
American Public Utilities Co.: 

Annual report, 74 

Earnings and expenses, 859 
United Lt. & Rys. Co.: 

Annual report, 814 
Greenfield, Mass. : 

— —Connecticut Valley Street Railway, Appli- 
cation to consolidate with Northern 

Massachusetts Street Railway, 731 
Great Britain: 
Belfast Citv Tramways, Recruiting car, 

*793 

Electrification projects, 684 

— — Glasgow Corporation Tramways: 

Fffect of war, 302 

Front exit double-deck car with fold- 
ing step, *297 

Railway men as soldiers, *47 

Women as conductors, 790. 1031 

Hartlepool tramways. Bombardment of, 180 

London: 

Letters from, 69, 301, 476, 683, 853, 1085 

Reasons for success of motor bus, 888 

Strike, 998; Comments, 968 

Manchester Tramways, Effect of war, 302 

Motor bus costs, Comments, 869 

Municipal operation in England, [Connett], 

179 
Operating results of tramways analyzed 

[Lawson], 929 
Railways, Action of. At outbreak of war, 

70 

Signs, Illuminated guide, *473 

Ticket-printing machine at Victoria Sta- 
tion, London, •473 
Great Falls, Mont.: 
Electrification of terminal for C. M. & St. 

P. Ry., *1172 
Ground-wire alarm [Koppel], *144 
Guy anchor (Track Specialties Co.), *808 



H 

Hagerstown & Frederick Ry. (See Frederick, 

Md.) 
Hamilton, Ont. : 
Dominion Power & Transmission Co., Ltd.: 

Annual report, 688 
Hampton, Va. : 
Newport News & Hampton Ry.: 

Pension system, 1183 
Hanover, Pa.: 
— —-Hanover & McSherrytown Street Railway, 

Sale, 731 
Havana, Cuba : 
Havana Electric Railway, Light & Power 

Company: 

New power station [Ricker], "920 
Hawaii: 
Honolulu Rapid Transit & Land Co. : 

Earnings and expenses during 1914, 
1179 

Red-cedar ties, 92 
Headlights: 
Golden Glow (Esterline), Test at Mobile, 

Ala., 194 

Light-weight, (Trolley Supply Co.), "lOSS 

Locomotive: 

Report of Master Mechanics Ass'n 
committee, 1116 

(Abbreviations: 'Illustrated, c Correspondence.) 



VII 



Headlights: (Continued) 

Test United Railways of St. Louis, 639 

Heating of cars: 

Requirements^ Study of, 103 

Heavy Electric Traction: 

Discussion before A. S. M. E., [Armstrong, 

Batchelder], 982 

Discussion of electrification [Goodnow, 

Murray, Gibbs and Katte], 579 

Electrification of Tamestown, Westfield & 

Northwestern R. R., *1110 

Maintenance of electrical equipment. 

Master Mechanics Ass'n report, 1115 

New York Central R. R., Maintenance 

costs [Katte], 580 

Norfolk & Western Ry. [Gibbs], 581 

Operating costs, Experience of New Haven 

road [Murray], 229; Comment, 213; 
[Storer], c335; [Henderson], c 380 
Three-phase electrifications in Italy, Re- 
sults [Pontecorvo], *283, *450 
Henderson (Ky.) Street Ry.; 

Franchise matters, 434 

High-tension direct-current railways; 

Annapolis Short Line, Conversion from 

single-phase to d. c. operation without 
interruption of service, *542 

Berlin tests, 338 

Electrification of "Valeria Way" line in 

Great Falls, Mont., '1173 
Michigan Railway, 2400-volt line. Construc- 
tion features, *1144 

Progress of 1914, 13 

Salt Lake & Utah R. R., Details of line, *54 

Tatra Ry., Hungary, 1650-volt line, 248 

Wendelstein Ry., Germany, 1500-volt line, 

274 
Highway crossings: 

Illinois standard, *145 

Protection (See Signals). 

Highwood, 111.: 

— —Chicago & Milwaukee Electric Railroad: 

Results with ampere hour meters on 
cars, *973 
Hobart, Ind. : 

G'ary, Hobart & Eastern Traction Com- 
pany, Stock reduction, 646 
Hocking Valley Railroad : 

Service order carried to Supreme Court, 

777 
Hoist, Motor truck. For pole handling (North- 
ern Engineering), *475 
Holyoke, Mass. : 

Holyoke Street Railway; 

Boiids offered, 646 

Feeder panels for carhouse trolley wires, 

*I214 
Locating lathe in floor recess, 1040 
New carhouse and shops, "930 
Shop trucks, *899 

Temporary drilling outfit for running- 
board toe plates, 1174 
Houston, Texas: 

Houston Electric Company; 

Advertising, 1050 
. — - — Houston Electric Co.: 

Publication of magazine, 260 

Jitney bus, 648, 1021 

Ordinance providing for paving mainte- 
nance by railways, 856 
Hudson & Manhattan R. R. (See New York City) 
Hydroelectric Power Commission: 

Report, 1137 

Hydro-radial Railways: 

Meeting of Niagara District Hydro-radial 

Union, 643 



Illinois Central R. R.: ^ 
— ;— Gas-electric cars, 5 1 
Illinois Electric Railway Association: 
Feeder tap protection [Smith], 626; Com- 
ment, 659 

Meetings, 173, 626 

Illinois Public Utilities Commission, First 

year's work, 349 
Illinois Traction System (See Peoria, 111.) 
Impact between moving cars [Endsley], 1164 
Indiana Railways & Light Co. (See Kokomo, 

Ind.) 
Indiana railway statistics [Duncan], 456 
Indianapolis, Ind. : 
Indianapolis Traction & Terminal Company; 

Alleged violation of arbitration award, 
902 

Earnings during 1914, 907 

Extension of tracks. Commission order 
not upheld, 1000 

Labor controversy, 855 

Motion for injunction by labor, 812 
Terre Haute, Indianapolis & Eastern: 

.\nnual report, 1179 

Central oiling system for power plant, 

•896 

Controversy with county commissioners, 
1050 

Copper aone system, 734 
Traction terminal station, TrafKc statistics. 

440 
Inertia effect of moving trains (See Energy 

Consumption) 
Inspection of cars; 
Methods in Greater New York [Whistonl. 

133 
Procedure, Milwaukee Elec. Ry. & T t Co 

787 



VIII 



INDEX. 



[Vol. XLV. 



Instruction of employees (See Employees) 

Insulating tape requirements [Austin], 888 

Insulation: 

Materials and methods in motor insulation 

[Ilellmund], 508 

Insulators: 

Boro-porcelain [Lockel], *765 

Corrugated wet process (Pittsburgh), *593 

Third-rail, new type (Bridgeport Brass 

Co.), "1175 

Insurance or employees (See Employees, In- 
surance) 

Insurance, Fire (See fire protection and insur- 
ance) 

Interstate Commerce Commission : 

Access to private correspondence denied 

by Supreme Coitrt, 434 

Accident reports, ruling on, 883 

Conference on federal valuation, 1031 

Decision on Crosby transportation case, 

1137 

Report on accidents, 1071 

Report on steam roads for 1913, 289 

Interest rates (See Financial) 

Interurban railways: 

Automobile industry. Effect of, 448 

Statistics in Indiana, 456 

Iowa & Illinois Ry. (See Clinton, la.) 

Iowa Street & Interurban Railway Association: 

Convention papers, 794; Proceedings, 839 

Italy: 

Italian State Rys. : 

Locomotives, Three-phase, 53; [Pontecor- 
vo], *283 

^Three-phase electrifications, Results of 

IPontecorvo], *450 



Tack suspended from side sill of car, Lehigh 
Valley Transit Co. [Branson], *191 

Jacks : 

Emergency (Buckeye), *194 

Emergency (Templeton, Kenly & Co), *897 

Hydraulic [Koppel], *1039 

Tackson ^Iiss * 

Jackson Light & Traction Company, One- 
man cars, 1136 

Jacksonville (Fla.) Traction Co. financial mat- 
ters, 254 

Jamestown, VVestfield & Northern Railroad: 

Electrification, 1110 

Jersey City: 

Industrial development railway proposal, 

•663 

Jim Crow law upheld in Kentucky, 400 

Jitney buses: 

Ammunition in jitney war, *634 

As a gold brick, 919 

Koise, Idaho, ordinance, 397 

Buses for sale in Kansas City, *1149 

Cartoons, *846 

Coloi line, Comment, 1189 

Competition in various cities, Early his- 
tory [Meade, Black], *324; Comment, 
318 

Complaisance regarding accidents, 1141 

Convention, 650, 817, 911, 960 

Cost of bus operation. Figures based on 

actual results for auto buses and jitneys. 
Estimates made by projected companies 
[Laflerty, Weaver], *414 

Cost of operation, 620 

Craze on the wane, 784 

— — Data from Houston, Texas, 1021 

Distribution of nickel compared with street 

railway, 1024 

Discussion of [Kealy], 1071 

Eighty years ago, 61 1 

El Paso, Texas, 1105 

For Houston, Texas [J. G. Brill], '640 

Franchise developments in Des Moines, 

950; Comments, 917 

Georgia Railroad Commission ruling, 1182 

Illinois Commission hearing, 1093; Order, 

1135 

In Los Angeles, 76; [Lewis], 757 

In Omaha [Palm], 795 

Information summarized from fourteen 

cities, 648 

Issue at Los Angeles election, 1094 

^Jitney situation [Johnson], 985 

Jitneys and railway service. Comments, 969 

^Legislation in various cities, 484 

Maryland, Rules established, 1226 

Massachusetts bill, 258 

Menace^ 83 

Misleading advertisements, 657 

Official publication, 912 

Operating cost compared with electric rail- 
way, 622 

Operation in Dallas, Texas, Earnings, 884 

Permanent national organization, 960 

Philadelphia, 1223 

Publicity campaign against^ Ft Worth, 1049 

Publicity for the jitney. Comment, 1013 

Puget Sound Traction, Light & Power Co. 

enters field, 1093 

Record of the movement, 76, 156, 204, 258, 

309, 353, 374, 396, 484, 530, 602, 648, 
691, 733, 774, 817, 861, 908, 957, 1005, 
1048, 1092, 1133^ 1182 

Regulation in various cities, 374, 817; 

Comment, 361 
Report of American Electric Railway As- 
sociation, 619 



San Antonio, Count, 1197 

— — San Francisco jitney bus matters, 256 

Situation in Mobile, Ala. [Wilson], c 421 

Syndicated anti-railway news, *462: Com- 
ment, 449; [Waters], c 586 
■ Tabulation of bond arid license requirements 

in various cities, 1223 

The jitney situation, 494 

Who are jitney drivers? 967 

(See also Motor buses) 

Joliet, III.: 

Chicago & Joliet Electric Railway: 

Paving experiences [Tennon], 1079 

Safety work, 934 
Joliet & Eastern Traction: 

Stock destruction, 731 
Joliet, Plainfield & Aurora: 

Second bankruptcy dividend, 731 
Junction box. Home-made [Koppel], *383 
Kankakee & Urbana Traction Co. (See Ur- 

bana. 111.) 



Kansas City, Mo.: 

Board of control. Work of, 251 

— —Floods, 1129 

Interurban railway station proposal, 524, 

725 

Jitney bus, 649 

Kansas City, Clay County & St. Joseph 

Railway: 

Fare reduction restrained. 1136 

Insurance for employees, 651 

Poles blown down, 625 

St. Tosepli rates restrained, 118 

Kansas City Railway & Light Co.: 

Reorganization plan, 197, 351, 481, 773 
Reorganization time extended, 74 

Metropolitan Street Railway: 

Christmas shoppers assisted bv conduct- 
ors, 76 
City to purchase system. 349 
Extensions recommended, 391 
Financial .statement from receivers, 956 
Issue receivers* certificates, 906 
Joker discovered in franchise, 1007 
New cars, *850 
New viaduct line, 728 
l^eorganization time extended, 1221 
Reorganization plan disapproved, 481 
Rush-hour methods, 31 
.Side destination signs, 735 
Tractor and trailer truck, *516 
Transfer greetings, 78 

Missouri, Oklahoma & Gulf R. R. 

Electrification suggested, 252 

Safety zones, permanent, 1007 

Union station .service, 109 

Kansas City-Western Ry. 

Fare readjustment, 78 

Kansas-Oklahoma Traction Co. (See Nowata, 
Okla.) 

Kennebunk, Maine: 

Atlantic Shore Railway: 

Annual report, 905 

Kentucky Traction & Terminal Co. (See Lex- 
ington, Ky.) 

Keyport, N. J. : 

New Jersey Traction Company sale, 689 

Kokomo, Ind.: 

Indiana Railways & Light Co.: 

Extension of copper zone system, 119 



Labor. (See Employees) 

Lackawanna & Wyoming Valley Railroad. (See 
Scranton, Pa.) 

Lamp bank. Portable, for use in substations 
[Tanis], "893 

Lamps, Electric: 

Small Mazdas with concentrated filaments, 

519 

(See also Lighting of cars) 

Lawrence, Mass. : 

Bay State Street Railway transfer privilege, 

651 

Legal: 

Alien Labor Bill repealed in New York, 525 

Decision on delayed deliveries of material, 

\yashington & Old Dominion Ry, 1177 

Decisions on liability for negligence, 107, 

.900 

Decision on taxes for leased lines in Ohio, 

1179 

Electric railway legal decisions, 107. 681, 

900 

Franchises invalid without consent of prop- 
erty holders^ Cincinnati, O., 1178 

Franchise valuations. New Jersey Gas Case 

(See Franchises: Valuation) 

Jim Crow law in Kentucky, 400 

Michigan Central Railroad ordered to in- 
terchange cars with Detroit United Ry, 
532 

New Jersey "Seven Sisters" law amended, 

727 

Non-unionism a basis of employment, Kan- 
sas decision, 266 

Order for free electric service to public 

buildings in Plainfield, N. J., set aside, 
668 

Ordinance against smoking in Butte, Mont., 

533 

(Abbreviations: 'Illustrated, c Correspondence.) 



Pay-as-you-enter patent decision, 195 

Repeal of New York Alien Labor law per- 
mits work to recommence on subways, 
599 

Special rates no basis for permanent rates 

in California, 1007 

Legislation: 

Electric railway, in various States. 434, 685, 

855 

Indiana, 302, 347, 390, 432, 478 

New York, 433, 478 

Ohio, 391, 478 

Rayburn, Interstate Commerce bill, 151 

Texas, 392 

Trend in State of Washington [Leonard], 

729 

Lehigh Valley Transit Co. (See Allcntown, Pa.; 

Lewiston, Me.: 

Lewiston-Augusta & Waterville Railway: 

Freight equipment [Nottage], *1213 
Note issue, 1004 

.Way records on cost-per-section basis 
[Hulett], *669 

Lexington. Ky. : 

Kentucky Traction & Terminal: 

Employes* participation plan proposed, 

1183 
"We" slogan sign [Bacon], c '292 

Lighting of cars: 

-Emergency magnet switches (Palmer Elec- 
tric & Mfg.), *640 

Investigation New York Municipal Railway 

(J^orporation (Gove, Porter), "614, *710 

Locking sockets and receptacles to prevent 

thefts of incandescent lamps (General 
Electric), *429 

Voltage regulator, *851 

Lighting a gage board from behind, '193 

Little Rock, Ark.: 

Railway & Electric Co. wage increase, 159 

Loan society organized in New York, 687 

Loading limits for cars: 

— ■ — Board of Health order in New York City, 
487, 604, 735, 961; Comment, 494 

Order to Brooklyn Rapid Transit Co., 777 

Ordinance in Detroit, 604 

-Proposed ordinance in Toronto, 533 

Proposed for Chicago, 605 

Standard seating space. Public Service Com- 
mission, New York, 1094 

Locomotives: 

Bethlehem-Chile Iron Mines Co., 67 

Butte, Anaconda & Pacific R. R., Experi- 
ences with 2400-volt locomotives [Coxl. 
136 

Comparison of Mallet and electric, *1073 

Design of [Arthur], 1209 

Electric and steam compared, 1155 

Italian State Railway, Three-phase locomo- 
tives, 53; [Pontecorvo], *283, *450 

Modern rugged design, 1055 

Maintenance costs. New York Central R. R. 

[Katte], 580; Comment, 611 

Panama Canal towing locomotives, *235 

Pennsylvania R. R., at the Panama-Pacific 

Exposition, *387 

Single-phase, for Prussian State Railways, 

667 

Single-phase, three-phase, Norfolk & West- 
ern, *1060 

Steam and electric maintenance costs, c 672 

3000-volt d.c. for Chicago, Milwaukee & St. 

Paul Railway, *1072; Comments, 1055 

Locomotive, Internal combustion. One man, *68 

London, Ontario: 

London Street Railway, 731 

Annual report. 

Long Island City: 

-Manhattan & Queens Trac. Corp.: 

Three-in-one car for line repairs [Sher- 
wood], *1121 

Long Island R. R. : 

Combined steel and wooden trains dis- 
continued, 78 

Operation costs, 815 

Protest against reelection of directors, 773 

^Steel cars. Ten years* experience, "566; 

Comment, 539 

Stockholders' suit against Pennsylvania 

R. R., 731 

Tracks to be used by New York subway 

trains, i99 

Los Angeles, Cal. : 

Car maintenance records, 1214 

-Court sustains 10-cent fare to Eagle Rock, 

856 

Jitney bus: 

Klection issue, 1094 

Regulations, Hearing, 156; Comment, 83 

Special message, 76 

Los Angeles Railway Corporation: 

Bond issue, 1004 

Illuminated destination sign with car 
and run numbers, '1169 

Monticeto R. R. Opening, 391 

Pacific Electric Railway: 

Collision with locomotive, 1050 

New interlocking plant (General Ry 

Signal), '946 
Shockless railroad crossing, '994 
Street and station indicator, 67 

Purchasing of railways by city under con- 
sideration, 349, 1220 

Service methods, 78 

Transfer of railway properties denied, 528 

Transportation problems, 1129 

Lost articles. Handling, New York Rys., 28 



January-June, 1915.] 



INDEX. 



IX 



Louisville, Ky. : 

— ■ — Louisville & Interurban: 

Dealing with the spitter, 487 
Louisville Railway: 

Accident record, 899 

Keminiscences of veteran employe, 1209 

Value of politeness [Funk], 735 
Louisville & Southern Indiana Trac. Co. : 

Freight rate agitation, 820 

Safety zone plan, 735 

Sand-spreading wagon [Havass], 300 

Lubrication of motors, siphon, Budapest, *342 
Lumber, (trading of, A. K. E. A. report, 571 



M 



380, 
*510 



McKeesport, Pa. : 

Pittsburgh, McKeesport & Westmoreland 

Ry., Receiver sale, 816 
Mahoning & Shenango Railway & Light Co. (See 

Voungstown, Ohio) 
Mail Transportation: 

Moon Post Office Bill defeated, 521 

— — Parcel post "without additional compensa- 
tion," 165 
— — Pay for mail compared with express rates, 

741 
Maine, Railway statistics, 7Z 
Maintenance expenses, proportionate increase 

since 1907, 540 
Maintenance of electric railway equipment 

[Barnes], 467; Discussion, 465 
Maintenance of cars: 
— ■ — Reducing by proper handling of equipment 

[Leonhauser], 384 
Maintenance records and costs: 

Car maintenance, Rome, Ga. [Wade], 383 

Car maintenance records, Los Angeles, 1214 

Costs of concreting pavement [Gausmann], 

718 

Motor repairs on Memphis Street Ry, *721 

New York Central R. R. [Katte], 580; 

Comments, 611 
Signal maintenance, New York, Westchester 

& Boston Ry., 565 

Steam and electric locomotives, c 672 

Wheel and axle records, Chicago Elevated, 

*551 
Manganese Steel Foundry Society, Special work 

standards, 755, 1118 
Manganese steel (See Truck Construction) 
Manganese Track Society: 

Manganese steel work specifications, 1118 

Special work standards, 755 

Manila. P. I.: 

• Manila Electric Railroad & Light Co.: 

Company section. Meetings, 337, 
673, 798, 1033, 1211; Officers, 

New schedule, 260 

Operating results, 422 

Safety first movement, 1 1 20 
Manhattan & Queens Traction Corporation (See 

Long Island City) 
Manufacturers and their relations to the rail- 
ways [Tripp], 185 
Maps: 
^Jamestown, Westfield & Northern Railroad, 

nil 

Michigan Railway and allied lines, 1145 

Norfolk & Western electric zone, *1060 

Massachusetts Electric Companies (See Boston) 

Massachusetts: 

Public Service Commission: 

Annual report, 196 

Railway investments, 201 

Transportation in western part of state. Re- 
port of legislative commission, 197 

Massachusetts Street Railway Association, Meet- 
ing, 137 

Master Car Builders' Association: 

Convention, 1163; Exhibits, 1117 

Plans for annual meeting, 137 

Mayor's Utility Bureau. Organization, 112 

Medal, Anthony N. Brady, Award of, *239 ; 
Comment, 211 

Medical methods, Chicago Elevated Rys. [Fisher], 
*1192 

Memphis, Tenn.; 

Memphis Street Railway Company: 

Maintenance co-operation, *721 
Publicity in the shop, 699 

Messages of the governors, 146, 195 

Metallic salts for pyrometric purposes. Use of 
(Nehls Alloy Co.), 106 

Meters on cars (See energy consumption) 

Metropolitan Street Ry. (See Kansas City, Mo.) 

Mexico: -^ 

Effect of war on railways, 1086 

Michigan City, Ind. : 

Chicago, Lake Shore & South Bend Ry. : 

Sheet steel pilot, "106 

Michigan Railway: 

Description of 2400-volt line; service, road- 
way, third-rail construction, surge pro- 
tection, *1144 

^New line opened, 1044 

Middlesex & Boston Street Ry. (See Newton- 
viUe, Mass.) 

Midi Railway (See France) 

Mileage statistics for 1914, 14; Comment, 12 

Milwaukee Wis. : 

Milwaukee Electric Ry. & Light Company: 

Annual report, 645 

Asphalt relaying with hot mixer, *1080 



Milwaukee. Wis.: 

— Milwaukee Elec. Ry. & Lt. Co.: (Continued) 

Bonus system for employees, 1008 

(^ompany section, 100, 418 

Fare case decision, 1226 

Machine tool guards, 756 

Railroad commission rescinds low-fare 
order, 3iZ 

Repair-shop procedure, *786 

Zone fares. Paper before New England 
R. R. Club [Stearns], *836; Com- 
ment, 825 
Milwaukee Northern Railway: 

Regulators for car lighting circuits, *851 
Wisconsin Railway Light & Power Co.: 

Annual report, 153 
Minneapolis, Minn.: 
Twin City Rapid Transit Co.: 

Annual report, 527 

Cable splicer's portable tool box, *247 

Flange-bearing special work [Wilson], 
c 1034 

Pension plan for employees, 118 
Missouri Association of Public Utilities: 

Convention, 1071 

Missouri, Oklahoma & Gulf R. R. (See Kansas 

City) 
Missouri public utility law, 1 13 
Mobile, Ala.: 
— — Advantages of small cars [Wilson]. cl206 

Jitney bus situation [Wilson], c 421 

Monterey, Cal. : 

■ Monterey & Pacific Grove Railway, Bond 

issue refused by commission, 773 
Monticeto R. R. (See Los Angeles, Cal.) 
Montpelier, Vt. : 
— — liarre & Montpelier Traction & Power Co., 

Fare increase, 119 
Montreal, Can. : 
— —Flange-bearing special work [Graves], 

c 1034 
Montreal Tramways: 

Franchise extension, 112 

Note issue, 689 

Municipal ownership, Report on, 1001 

Safety first league, 159 

Safety first savings, 165 

Montreaux O^berland Ry. (See Switzerland) 



[Hellmund], 
Ry., CharaC" 



Morris Plan Co., New York organization, 687 

Motor Buses: 

(Also see Jitney Buses) 

■ Chicago. 1 raction fund for municipal sys- 
tem, 348 

Double deck, with low roof, Vienna, *49 

In London [Gordon], 888; Comment, 869 

Interurban bus service, 1218 

Rush hour service, 658 

Seattle, Wash., motor bus fund, 199 

Well construction with low roof in Vienna, 

*49, *51 

Washington Motor Bus Co., Details of serv- 
ice, 1225 

Motors: 

Axle bearing cap with oil-saving filler, *66 

Baffle plate for motor axle bearing caps 

[Fox], *424 

Calculations of starting resistances [Sim- 
mon, Cameron], c 238; [Buck], *330; 
ICastigboni], c 336, 381; [Harding], 
c 186; Comment, 405 

Chart for the transformation of speed 

curves for different voltages [Castig- 
lioni], *515 

Efficiency [Hellmund], 594 

Field-control motor speeds 

520 

1500-volt for C. M. & St. P. 

teristic curves, *1073 

High-tension d. c. tap field for Central Ar- 
gentine Railway, *679 

■ Impregnation of coils (Electric Operations 

Co.), *429 

Insulating materials and methods [Hell- 
mund], 508 

Lubrication, Siphon, Budapest, *342 

Maximum motor input [Mulder], c 511 

New York Municipal Ry., 160-hp., tap- 
field, *497 

Overloads and flashing [Parshall], c 57 

Pressed steel (Westinghouse), *1041 

Resistances, Effects of incorrect starting 

resistances [Corning], c"93 

• Selection for city service [Remington], 675 

Steinway tunnel equipment (General Elec- 
tric Co.), *1124; (Westinghouse), *764 

Testing insulation [Lewis], 1037; Comment, 

1055; [Gove], c 1119 

Ventilated cover to increase output [Par- 
sons], 1170 

'Ventilation, advantages and disadvantages 

[Hellmund], *833; Comment, 827; 
[Priest], c891; [Hellmund], *937; Com- 
ment, 968; [Adams], c 990; [Phillips], 
1209 

Mt. \'ernon, Ohio : 

■ Mt. Vernon Railway, Receiver appointed. 

773 

Moving pictures (See Accident claim depart- 
ment. Prevention) 

Multiple unit trains. Maintenance cost, 611 

Municipal Electric Railway (See Edmonton, 
Aha.) 

Municipal Ownership: 

Bills defeated, Massachusetts, 643, 812 

Dual ownership in Alsace, 1217 

England, Experience in [Connett], 179 

(Abbreviations: *Illustrated. c Correspondence.) 



Municipal Ownership: (Continued) 

Inquiry bill, California, 643 

Ohio bill passed permitting bond issues for 

purchase, 769 

Ordinance discussed, Toledo, 1042 

Pekin (111.) Street Railway transferred to 

City, 1000 



N 

Nashville, Tenn.: 

Nashville Ry. & Lt. Co. 

Safety crusade in schools, 1077 

Safety-first campaign, 78 
Nashville Traction Company, line opened, 

1000 
National bureau of transportation suggested by 

Howard Elliott, 741 
National Civic Federation: 

;-W'orkmen's compensation suggestions, 252 

National Committee on Line Construction: 

Meeting, 798, 986 

Plans, 101 

National electrical week. Plans, 435 
National Electric Light Association: 

.\ddress by President Scott, 1106 

Convention : 

Proceedings, 1106 

Officers elected, 1162 
National Electrical Safety Code: 

Comment, 825 

Conference postponed, Comment, 1189 

Discussion on [Harvie], c768; [Hanna, 

Cadle], c 1036; [Crecelius], c941: 

[Tingley], c 845 

Explanation of [Rosa], c 939 

Preliminary edition, 750; Comments, 741 

Representation at conference on details, 

1162 

Status of work [Rosa], 673 

National Railway Appliance Association: 

Secretary appointed, 1044 

New Bedford, Mass. ; 

New Bedford & Onset St. Ry. : 

Increase of fares, 819 

Increased fare suspended, 1136 
New England Street Railway Club: 

Annual meeting, 631 

Zone fares in Milwaukee [Stearns], *836; 

Comment, 825 
New Jersey Public Utility Commission report, 

New Jersey Traction Co. (See Keyport, N. J.) 
New Jersey Utilities League, 390 
New Haven, Conn.: 
Connecticut Co.: 

Life of way structure [Wilson], *1212 
New Orleans, La.: 
New Orleans Railway & Light Co.: 

Annual report, 1002 

Cars, all-steel, *270; Comment, 275 

Traffic survey, 311 
New York Central Railroad: 
Maintenance costs [Katte], 580: Comment, 

611 

Suburban fare case decision, 1136 

New York City: 

Accident statistics, 119, 134, 736, 1139 

American Cities Company: 

Annual report, 954 

Condition of subsidiaries, 307 
American Light & Traction: 

Earnings in 1914, 906 

Auto-bus franchises, 480 

Board of Education, Vocational lectures, 

454 
Capacity of cars limited by Board of Health, 

487, 604, 693, 856, 961; Comment, 494; 

Order defied, 1049; Upheld by courts, 

1184 
Consolidation of New York, Westchester S 

Boston Railway & Westchester North- 
ern Railroad, 1091 
Dry Dock, East Broadway & Battery Ry.: 

Bond issue not approved, 955 
Electric Bond & Share Co., Capital increase, 

393 . 

Fenders for Fifth Ave. buses, 1000 

Ferry-car transfers continued, 1184 

Hudson & Manhattan Railroad: 

Annual report, 730 

Complaint handling, 26 

Courtesy of employees, 20 

Earnings in 1914^ 114 

Hudson Companies, Annual meeting. 
153 

Painting cars in two days, Use of bak- 
ing enamel [See], •584 

Relay setting for uniform acceleration 
[See]. •761 

Safety record, 777 
Inspection of equipment by Public Service 

Commission [Whiston], 133 
Interborough-Metropolitan Investing & Se- 
curity Co., Investigation, 303 
Interborough-Metropolitan readjustment plan, 

858; Approved, 1090 
Interborough Rapid Transit Company: 

Dual system contract modified in re- 
gard to new steel subway cars, 770 

Elevated Railways: 
Accidents, 356 
Signals needed, 391 
Steel car report, 252 
Third-tracking, 480 



INDEX. 



z:>' 



[Vofi.! XLV; 



New York City: 

— Interborough Rapid Transit Co.: (Continued) 
Electrical equipment of Belmont tunnel 

cars, *764, 803, *1124 
Subway franchise taxable, Idl 
Passenger traffic, 134, 689 
Remodeling Seventy-fourth St. power 

station, 744, *764; Comment, 742 
Removal order against wooden subway 

cars, 644, 953 
Subway: 

Accident caused by short-circuit, 

95, 148, 432; Comment, 85 
Delay, third-rail short circuit, 305 
Fire, 598 

Labor problem, 113, 480 
Sand for, from Europe, 1200 
Service order concerning seating 

of passengers, 260 
Suggested changes for preventing 
accidents, 251, 729 
Welfare work, 487 

"Jay Walkers," Plan to suppress, 400 

Metropolitan Street Railway, Franchise tax 

reduction, 728 

Motor bus franchise matters, 113, 480, 1088 

New York Municipal Railway Corp.: 

Brakes and auxiliaries on new cars, 

*872 
Car lighting investigation [Gove, Por- 

ter], *614, *710 
Cars — Motors, control, conduit and 

collectors, *496 
Report on construction progress, 249 
Speed control for Brooklyn subway, 72 
Testing motor insulation [Gove], 1119 

New York & Queens County Ry.: 

Abandonment of portion of franchise 

prohibited, 952 
Service order, 863 

New York Railways: 

Interest rate fixed on income bonds, 689 
Lost articles, Handling, 28 
Snow-sweeper with outward swung 
broom. Tests of, *320; Comment, 
317 
Operating over broken water main, *1211 

New York, Westchester & Boston Railway: 

Consolidation with Westchester & 

Northern Railroad, 1091 
Signal maintenance methods, *561; 
Comment, 539 

Proposed leases of Long Island tracks to 

city, 772 

Public Service Commission: 

Charges against commission and in- 
vestigation. 71, 152, 199, 265, 
302, 309, 346, 430, 477, 641, 811, 
1042 
Inspection of equipment [Whiston], 133 
Report, 196 

Service orders to be enforced, 206 
Signal and steel car resolutions, 110 
Standard seating space fixed, 1094 
Suggestions regarding changes in sub-' 
way, 251 

Repeal of Alien Labor Law, 599 

Republic Railway & Light Co.: 

Annual report, 1090 

Smoking order suspended, 1227 

Staten Island Midland Railway: 

Issue of trust certificates, 860 

Stein way Tunnel : 

Electrical equipment for cars, *764, 

*1124 
Modifying agreement for temporary 
operation, 903 

Third Avenue Ry. : 

Accidents for 1913 and 1914, 296 
Ampere-hour meters on battery cars, 

593 
Ash-pit for blacksmith forges, Remov- 
able [Jenkins], *425 
Axles, Reclaimed by welding [Johnson], 

*294 
Blockade photos, Cash offered for^ 158 
Coasting time recorders. Experience, 

*S72; Comment, 541 
Crane car for track work [Ryder], *ltZ 
Investigation by stockholder's commit- 
tee, Report, 307 
Knife guard for jointer or planer [John- 
son], *805 
President's statement, 647 
Transfer printing plant, *702 
Sawdbox opened by fender trip [John- 
son], no6 
Snow pictures, 441 
Use of gas flame in removing pinions 

[Parsons], 988 
Window cleaner, Fixed squeegee on 
motorman's cab [Johnson], *339 
Utah Securities Corporation, Annual re- 
port, 1089 

1. G. White Companies, Annual report, 

1090 
New York Electric Railway Association: 
• — Meeting at Lake George, 464 ; Comment, 

447 
New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: 

Charter revision hearing, 769 

— — Electrified division, operating results [Mur- 
ray], 229; Comment, 213; [Storer], 
c335; [Henderson], c 380 

Future plans, 389 

Indictment of officials, 151, 643, 686, 729 



New York Railroad Club: 

Electrical night [Gibbs, Eaton, Pender, 

Murray, Armstrong, Turner and McClel- 
Ian] 624 

New York State: 

Constitutional Convention, Comment, 869 

Industrial Commission created, 1044 

Public Service Commission : 

Capitalization report, 306 
Quarterly pamphlet issued, 282 
Reorganization proposed, 71 
Report, 196, 509 
Rules of procedure. Changes, 112 

Securities for new construction, 393 

New York State Rys. (See Rochester, N. Y.) 
(See Syracuse, N. Y.) 

Newark, N. ^.; 

Passaic Gas case. (See Passaic, N. J.) 

Public Service Corporation: 

Annual Report, 600 

■ Public Service Ry. : 

Company section: 

Meetings, 188, 380, 418, 589, 631, 1211 
Officers, *100 
Program for year, 337 
Winter program, 1 
Increased energy consumption, 1022 
Moving pictures in safety education, 

*98 
Near side stop established by law in 

New Jersey, 962 
Open, steel underframe car, *I171 
Terminal, progress on, *793 
Safety methods, 282 

Newport iNews & Hampton Ry. (See Hamp- 
ton, Va.) 

Newtonville, Mass. : 

Middlesex & Boston Street Ry: 

Fare case, 137 

Niagara District Hydro-Radial Union: 

Annual Meeting, 643 

Niagara, Ste. Catharines h Toronto Ry. (See 
Ste. Catharines, Ont. ) 

Norfolk & Bristol Street Ry. (See Foxboro, 
Mass.) 

Norfolk & Western Ry. : 

Electrification plans [Gibbs], 581 

• Electrification, Description of line, locomo- 
tives, power house and service, *1058; 
Comment, 1057 

Northern Electric Ry. (See Chico, Cal.) 

Northern Ohio Traction Co. (See Akron, 
Ohio) 

Northern Texas Traction Co. (See Fort Worth, 
Tex.) 

Northern White Cedar Association: 

Convention, 274 

Norwich, Conn. : 

Shore Line Elect. Ry. : 

Wage increase, 1226 

Notices to the public. Wording of, 361 

Nowata, Okla. : 

Kansas-Oklahoma Traction ; 

Combination cars, 806 

Number box. Illuminated, Rockford, 111. [Gra- 
ham], *341 



O 

Oakland, Cal.: 

Exposition crowds, San Francisco, 642 

Oakland, Antioch & Eastern Railway: 

Annual report, 773, 905 
Management report, 646 
Steel ferryboat, * 1 3 3 

San Francisco-Oakland Terminal Rys.: 

Automobile accidents. Handling [Mills], 

1203 
Note issue, 74 
Power contract declared unreasonable, 

1001 
Readjustment statements, 1131 
Valuation findings, 1090 
Value of Key-Route property. Ap- 
praisal, 646 

Oakwood Street Railway. (See Dayton, O.) 

Ocean Shore R.R. (See San Francisco, Cal.) 

Ohio Electric Ry. (See Cincinnati) 

Ohio Industrial Commission: 

Compensation rulings, 373 

Ohio Public Utilities Commission : 

Report, 151 

Ohio Traction Company. (See Cincinnati, O.) 

Oiling system : 

Central lubricators, *896 

Oklahoma City: 

Jitney bus, 648 

Omaha & Lincoln Ry. & Lt. Co. (See Ralston, 
Neb.) 

Omaha, Neb.: 

Omaha & Council Bluff Street Railway: 

Annual report, 1045 
Valuation of properties, 252 

One-man cars: 

Experiences with [Howard], 233 

Ontario Hydro-Electric railways, 305 

Ontario. Canada: 

Railways under compensation act, 348 

Storm conditions, 347 

Operating problems; 

Increasing capacity of the line, 6 

Standards in the operating department, 8 

Operating records and costs: 

Amperehour meter records, Chicago & Mil- 
waukee Railroad, 974 

Bay State Street Railway, arbitration, sta- 
tistics quoted, 708; Comment, 700 

(Abbreviations: *inustrated. c Correspondence.) 



Operating Records and Costs; (Continued) 
Coasting records, Various railways, *706, 

*1198 
Distribution of operating expenses, Census 

report, 96, 131 

Economies with small cars [Layng], *979 

■ Equipment failure records, Standardization, 

1099 

Jitney bus, 620 

Milwaukee Electric Railway & Light Co., 333 

Need for standards, 8 

New York, New Haven & Hartford R.R.. 

Electrified division [Murray], 329; 

Comment, 213 
Pennsylvania R. R., locomotive performance, 

1217 

Service record chart, Chicago, *366 

Taxicabs, 621 

— —Tramways of Great Britain [Lawson], 929 

-(See also Traffic counts) 

Ottawa, 111.: 

Chicago, Ottawa & Peoria Ry.: 

Bridge and building inspection report 
forms, *342 

Restoring wheel flangers with welder 
[Murphy], *719 

Sand experience [Carr], 143 

Way department rule book to promote 
standard practice, 89 
Ottawa, Ont: 
■ Ottawa Traction Company, Ltd.: 

Annual report, 688 
Overhead construction: 
Automatic section insulator (Westinghouse), 

*852 
— - — ^Clevis clamps for standard cable, *805 
Combination side-feed wedge for splice ears, 

*1041 
Cross arms. Malleable iron, on wooden 

poles. New York State Rys., *297 
Dead-ending feeders to metal poles [M'Kel- 

way], *143 
■ — —Double trolley system, Seattle [Kennedy], 

*128 
Italy, the Lecco-Calolzio line [Pontecorvo], 

*4S3 
• Line construction on Chicago, Milwaukee & 

St. Paul Railway, *934 

Mechanical cable connections [Fargo], *1216 

Philadelphia- Paoli electrification, 1118 

Pick-up for broken trolley wires [Branson], 

*295 
Trolley frogs for high-speed operation [West- 
inghouse], 1217 
Trolley frogs for one degree of angle 

(Westinghouse), *428 
■ Trolley wire location on curves [Foster], 

*62, *105, *142, 191, *242 
Pacific Electric Ry. (See Los Angeles, Cal.) 
Pacific Gas & Electric Co. (See San Francisco, 

Cal.) 
Packages, Charge for carrying on cars abolished 

in Seattle, Wash,, 1184 



Paints and painting: 

Eliminating frills to reduce cost [Lewis], 

847 

Hudson & Manhattan R.R., Use of baking 

enamel [Lee], *584 

Uniformity in color [Mc.Money], c468 

Change color and save money, 268 

Palo Alto, Cal.: 

Rate complaint against Southern Pacific Ry. 

dividend, 1050 

Panama Canal: 

Electric towing, *235 

Panama-Pacific Exposition ; 

Award to Electric Railway Journal, 1141 

Electric railway exhibits, 519 

Electric Railway Journal booth, 1155 

-Fair grounds transportation, *754 
Jury on awards, 890 

--ocomotive, Electric, of Pennsylvania R.R., 
*387 

Transportation exhibits, *504 

Pantographs: 

Annapolis Short Line, *550 

C., M. & St. P. Ry., Double contact pans 

[Armstrong], *1072 

Parkersburg, W. Va.; 

— ■ — Kanawha Traction & Electric Co.: 

Merger with Parkersburg, Marietta & 
Interurban Ry., 1180 

Parks: 

Amusement parks opened in Kansas City, 

1024 

Passaic pT T * 

Gas rate case, cS7, 112. 199, 304, 1177 

Passenger-mile earnings, Recorder for (Bon- 
ham), •948 

Pavement: 

Asphalt relaying with hot mixer, *1080 

Cutting concrete [M'Kelway], "993 

Discussions on wood block and stone block 

paving [Oxholm, Tillson, Schmidt], 134 

Experiences at Joliet [Tinnon], *1079 

Methods and cost of concreting [Gaus- 

mann], 718 

Traffic standards and traffic values, 135 

Treated wood-block pavements, Discussions 

at American Wood Preservers' Associa- 
tion, 181 

Warning signs for new work [Cram], *893 

Peak traffic. (See Rush-hour) 

Pearson, !>. F. S., Obituary [Quick], c 988 



Tu: 

Lo 



January-June, 1915.] 



INDEX. 



XI 



Peekskill, N. Y.: 

Putnam & Westchester Traction Co., One- 
man operation, 399 
Pekin 111.: 

Municipal railway bonds, 391 

Pekin Street Railway transferred to city, 

1000 
Pennsylvania Railroad : 

Electrification plans, 524 

— flailing communications with dividends, 613 

Locomotive performance, 1217 

Philadelphia electrification trials, 596 

Policy with employees, 950 

Publicity practice, 1042; Comments, 1013 

Training men for electric operation [Rob- 
erts], *970; Comments, 968 
Pennsylvania State: 

Compensation measures signed, 1130 

Pennsylvania Street Railway Association: 

Spring meeting, 935, *979; Question Box, 

781 
Peoria, 111.: 
Illinois Traction System: 

Chemical laboratory [Beagle], 423 

Coil winding unit [Chubbuck], *1213 

Power Dispatching methods [Fitch], 
*470 

Signaling system. Installations of 1914 
[Leisenring], *408 

Jitney bus, 649 

Phase converters, 1061; Comment, 1057 

Philadelphia, Pa.: 

American Railways Company: 

Semi-steel cars in colHsion [Keen], 
*c 715 
Fairmount Park Transportation Co.: 

Order to sell at auction, 955 

Receivers loan, 689 

Sale, 1222 

Fare registration [Edmunds], c 716 

Jitney bus, 649 

Rapid transit : 

Improvements, 349, 684 

Loan approved, 901 

Loan ordinance, 152 

Mass meeting, 200 

Measure signed, 523 

Ordinance, 479 

Plans, 391 
-Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company: 

Safety-first poster stamps, *665 
United Railways Investment Company: 

Financial statement [Starring], 646 
Pilots, Sheet steel, Chicago, Lake Shore & South 

Bend Ry., *106 
Pittsburgh, Pa.: 

Freight ordinance, 399 

Objection to Pittsburgh subway bill, 644 

Pittsburgh Railways Co.: 

Baling waste paper, shavings and ex- 
celsior [Yungbluth], c 239 

Portable substations, *1039 

Safety propaganda, *796 

Transfer system, 399 
Pittsburgh, McKeesport & Westmoreland Ry. 

(See McKeesport, Pa.) 
Pittsfield, Mass.: 
Berkshire Street Railway: 

Cheshire high-tension wire case, 78 

Petition for increased fares, 693 

Substation, Portable semi-outdoor, *56 
Poles: 
Concrete, Electrolysis develops defects, New 

York State Railways [Throop], 294 
Discussion at Western Red Cedar Associa- 
tion, 180 

(See also Timber preservation) 

Portland, Me.: 

Cumberland County Lt. & Pr. Co.: 

Fare reduction denied, 605 

Jitney advertisement, "634 
Portland, Eugene & Eastern Railway. (See 

Salem, Ore.) 
Portland, Ore.: 
Portland Railway, Light & Power Co.: 

Annual report, 1089 

Jitney bus, Statement concerning, 396 

Note offering, 816 

Readjustment of capitalization, 860 

Rush-hour traffic and schedule adjust- 
ment, *13S 

Weekly publication for patrons, 651 
Porto Rico: 
Porto Rico Railways: 

Annual report, 732 
Portugal: 

Lisbon Tramways, Earnings and expenses, 

1222 
Power dispatching, Illinois Traction System 

[Fitch], _ *470 
Power Distribution: 

Cable splicer's tool box, Minneapolis, *247 

Feeder-tap, Effect on schedule speed 

[Stahl], *991 . 
- — ^Feeder-tap protection, Comment, 659 
Feeder-tap resistance in rotary-converter 

practice [Crecelius], [Baugher], c799 
Fibre conduit installation for feeder taps, 

•1125 

Location of feeder-taps [Smith], 627 

National joint committee on line construc- 
tion (See National Committee) 

Return circuits [Skelly], 794 

Review of 1914, 4 

Power Generation: 

Diesel engines, insurance of, 1057 

Direct-connected exciters, 680 

Fuel values of coal, oil and gas [Hunter], 

984; [Purtee], 984 



Power Generation: (Continued) 

Future centra! station development [Moyer], 

c987 

Obsolescence on a large scale, 742 

Oil fuel for standby service [Delany], 1106 

Review of 1914, 4 

Test of Diesel engine (Mcintosh & Sey- 
mour), 639 

Transformer blower (Buffalo Forge), 639 

Power Stations: 

New plant for Havana Ry., *9-20 

Norfolk & Western Railroad at Bluestone, 

1063 

Possible lines of progress [Thomas], c939 

l^emodeling 74th Street Station of Inter- 
borough Rapid Transit Co., 744 

Power stations, Hydroelectric : 

Rochester Railway & Light Co., 247 

President of a railway. Qualifications, 503 

President Wilson's address at mid-year meeting, 
217, 275; Comments of the press, 278; 
Opinions [Shonts, Williams, Budd, 
Clark, Cummirgs], c290 

Profits, Limiting, 149 

Providence, R. I.: 

i^hode Island Co.: 

Federal dissolution decree, 479 

Ptublic, Relations with: 

Business conditions [Tripp], 185 

Complaint bureaus on various lines, 23 

Human nature and the railroad, 1099 

Management and public relations [ Peirce] , 

459 

"Mixing" as an asset [Cooper], 842 

— —"Pointed paragraphs on public policy," 71 

Public-be-pleased policy, Review of current 

railway practice, 20 

Railways must give good service, 9 

Report of N. E. L. A. committee, 1107 

— — (See also Referendums; Complaints, etc.) 

Public Service Commissions: 

• -Annual Reports: 

California, 771, 769, 815; Connecticut, 
769; Indiana, 684; Missouri, 725; 
Washington, 528 

Commission organized in Wyoming, 728 

Conferences with officevs of public utilities, 

265 

Engineers as members [Cooley], 1158 

Exhibit at Panama-Pacific Exposition, 707 

Extension of powers in New Jersey, 598 

Investigation in New York (See New York 

City) 

Nominations recalled in Pennsylvania, 810 

Ohio Commission sustained by Supreme 

Court, 597, 598 

Public co-operation at commission hearings, 

167 

Publication of annotated reports proposed, 

250 

Publicity by commissions [Gushing], c58 

(Qualifications, Comment on, 699 

Regulation by, [Maltbie, Mitchel and Har- 
rison], 810 

Regulation by commission. "Experimental 

service," 167 

Regulation of common carriers [Duncan], 

632 

Service standards for St. Louis, 961 

Utility law amended in State of Washing- 
ton, 770 

Views on regulation expressed at New York 

State Constitutional Convention, 1086 

Work during 1914. Care in choosing of 

personnel, 5 
Public Service Corporations: 

— —Co-operation and publicity [Kingsbury], 223; 
Discussions [Ely, Connette], 216; Com- 
ment, 213 

Order against duplication of facilities in 

California, 525 

Policies criticized [Cooke], 522 

Principles of taxation, 784 

Regulation [Atterbury], 378 

Publicity: 

Advantages [Allen], 280 

Atlanta, Ga. Newspaper advertising. 111 

Brooklyn Rapid Transit Co., Publicity 

pamphlets, 205 

Code of principles [Williams], 220; Discus- 
sions [ Tripp, Brush ] , 214 ; C^omment, 
212 

— Cost figures, importance of^ 743 

Mailing communications with dividends, 613 

New publications; 

Chicago Elevated Railways, 952 
Tri-City Railway & Light Co., 912 
Union Traction Co., Indianapolis, 820 
Virginia Railway & Power Company, 

692 
Portland Railway, Light & Power Co., 
651 
Syndicated anti-railway news, *462; Com- 
ment, 499; [Waters], c 586 
Puget Sound Electric Ry. (See Tacoma, Wash.) 
Puget Sound Traction, Light & Power Co. (See 

Seattle, Wash.) 
Pumps, Manhole drainage, Brooklyn, *247 
Putnam & Westchester Traction Co. (See Peeks- 
kill, N. Y.) 



Rail grinder, One-man (Equipment Engineering 

Co.), '475 
Rail Joints and Bonds: 

■ — —Maintaining the return circuit [Skelly], 794 
Short bonds costly [Fuller], 791 

(Abbreviations: •Illustrated, c Correspondence.) 



Rail Joints and Bonds: (Continued) 

Tests and costs of electrically welded joints 

[Price!, 1156 

Track bonds, Norfolk & Western Railroad, 

1067_ 

Railltss traction in Shanghai, China, 592 

Rails: 

Corrugation, Harder rails suggested as pre- 
ventative of [Sellcn], 578 

Life of open-hearth steel compared with 

manganese steely on curves, BrooTtlyn 
Rapid Transit Co. [Bernard], 383 

Manganese double-web guard rail I Bernard], 

M27 

Outfit for laying, Kankakee & Urbana Trac- 
tion Co. [Shelton], *242 

Statistics of production for 1914, 832 

• Titanium, Influence of, on segregation 

[Fitzgerald], 98 

Vanadium, Test of, Pennsylvania Steel Co., 

*388 

\Vear in Chicago B. O. S. E. report, *1195 

Railway Signal Association: 

Spring meeting, 1023 

Winter meeting, 582 

Ralston, Neb.: 

Omaha & Lincoln Railway & Light Com- 
pany 
New issue of securities, 731 

Rates, Railway (See Fares) 

Reactance (See Transmission lines) 

Reading, Pa.: 

Reading Transit Company, New line, 686 

Receiverships and foreclosure sales in 1914, 19 

Record forms: 

Inspection report, Bridge and building, Chi- 
cago, Ottawa & Peoria Ry., *342 

Instruction department forms, Rochester, 

N. Y., 367 

Recording progress in assembly of equip- 
ment [Litchfield], *339 

Track maintenance [Hulett], *669 

Recorder for passenger-mile earnings (Bonham 
Fare Recorder Co.), *948 

Records: 

Equipment failures standardized, 1099 

Graphical, and their use, 1014 

Records as evidence, 657 

Trouble board record, Chicago Elevated, 

Red Book ceases publication, 463 

Referendums in Brooklyn, Kansas City, Bo.ston 
and Denver, 27 

Registers (See also Fare Collection) 

Regulation (See Public Service Corporations) 

Repair shop equipment: 

Adjustable stand for forge shop. Blue Hill 

Street Railway, ^997 

Ash pit for blacksmith forges. Removable 

[Jenkins], *425 

Cabinets for small stock at Holyoke, *899 

— —Coil-winding unit [Chubbuck], *1213 

— — ( ombination welding and cutting outfit (Im- 
perial Brass &ffg. Co.), *997 

('Oggles on grinder, 896 

— — Grinding machine for grids [Keller], *64 

Headlight test bench at Holyoke, '899 

Home made saw for light tubing [Parsons], 

*849 

Hydraulic jack for pinion removal [Koppel], 

M039 

Oil-bath tank [Parsons], *65 

Portable commutator slotter rKopDell. 

•847 

Portable electric drills (Western Electric 

"Temco"), *949 

Portable lamp bank holder [Janis], *893 

Reel for live conductor used in moving 

cars or trucks in shop [Parsons], *894 

Switch for fixed or portable lamps in pit. 

*899 

Repair shop practice: 

'Armature-room force, Denver Tramwavs. 

1215 

Axles reclaimed by welding [Johnson], *294 

— —Chicago Elevated R. R., '551; Comment. 540 

Commutator soldering torch [Donovan], 

*1079 

Controller segment sample boards, *66 

Economic limit of repair shop [Berry], 1027 

Forming blocks for motor-case bolts. Rock- 
ford, 111. [Graham], *296 

Handling armatures, *1041 

Heating pinions, 638 

Impregnation of coils saves copper, 640 

Increasing hydraulic press output ["Vul- 
can"], 1170 

Installation and removal of pinions [Par- 
sons], *674 

Jig for planing bearing caps [Sutherland], 

944 

Knife guard for jointer and hand planer 

[Johnson], *805 

Labor side of maintenance, 540 

Lamp bank for equipment tests. Portable 

[Hinman], *513 

Locating wheel lathe in floor recess, *1040 

Maintenance of all-steel cars on Long Island 

R.R., •566; Comment, 539 

Maintenance of pinions [Parsons], 63S 

Milwaukee Elec. Ry. & lit. Co.'s procedure, 

•786 

Notched stick to steer wheel sets. New York 

State Rys., "592 

Publicity in the shop, Memphis, 699 

Removing pinions [Ross], 800 

Rethreadinp pinion-ends ["Vulcan"], *720 

Safety co-operation with employees, ^43 

- — —Scientific spirit in the shop, 1189 



XII 



INDEX. 



[Vol. XLV. 



Repair Shop Practice: ^(Continued) 

Short circuits in field coils, Testing methods 

[Foote], *64 
Sleeves shrunk on worn armature shafts 

["Vulcan"], *720 
Slotting commutators in motor shell 

[Koppel], *847 

Temporary drilling outfit at Holyoke, *1174 

Testing armature clearance f Lewis], S93 

Thrust plate for worn car axles [Vulcan], 

*635 
Trouble board, Tri-City Railway [Suther- 
land], *1078 
• Voltmeier measurements of direct current. 

Table [McKelway], 341 ; Corrections, 

427 
Welding worn wheel flanges [Murphy], *719; 

Danger of [Hayes], *942; Comment, 917 
Repair Shops: 
Cleveland Ry., Details of new buildings, 168; 

[Keen], c 290 

Evanston Kail way, *660 

Holyoke Street Railway, *930 

Norfolk & Western Railroad, *1069 

Springfield (Ohio) Ry., *556 

Republic Railway & Light Co. (See New York 

City) 
Rerailer for cars which serves as derailer for 

vehicles (Sargent), *594 
Resistances (See Motors) 

Rhode IslanN^ Public Utilities Commission, Re- 
port, 250 
Richmond, Va. : 
Virginia Railway & Power Co. : 

Franchise matters, 252, 1088 

New publication, 692 
Riverside, Cal.: 
Riverside, Rialto & Pacific Railroad: 

Purchase by Pacific Electric Co., 690 
Rochester, N. Y. : 
Buffalo, Lcckport & Rochester Ry. : 

Linemen's searchlight, *472 
■ New York State Rys.: 

Annual report, 482 

Complaint department, 23, 26 

Courtesy of employees, 21 

Cross arms. Malleable iron, on wooden 
poles, *297 

Electrolysis developes defects in con- 
crete poles [Throop], 294 

Fare case. Three-cent, Arguments before 
commission, 117; Decision, 439 

Instruction of employees, Methods of, 
and effect on the accident record 
[Lawson], 367 

Passenger handling at Kodak Park, *838 

Snow removal from under-running third- 
rail [Hinman], *469 

Step lighting, 247 

Telephone dispatching, *885 

Train-operation, Methods, *7S2 _ 

Way records on cost-per-section basis 
[Falconer], c 1035 
Rochester Railway & Light Co., Hydroelectric 

plant, 247 
Rockford, 111.: 
Rockford Citv Traction Company: 

Mutual Benefit Association, 735 
Rockford & Interurban Ry. : 

Forming blocks for motor-case bolts 
[Graham], *296 

Bond issue, 646 

Tail-light box [Graham], *424 
Rolling stock (See Cars) 
Rome (Ga.) Railway & Light Co.: 

Car maintenance, 383 

Runawav-car ston on Lackawanna & Wyoming 

Valle>; Ry., *706 
Rules, Discussion by A. E. R. A. committee, 379 
Rush-hour, Plotting peak traffic as an aid to 

schedule adjustment, Portland, Ore., 

•138 



Safety-First Movement (See Accident Claim 

Dept. — Prevention) 
St. Catharines, Canada: 
Niagara, St. Catharines & Toronto Ry. : 

Pav-as-you enter interurban cars, *246 
St. Louis, Mo.: 

.Titney bus, 648 

— Service order, standards of operation, 961 

St. Louis Elect. Term. Ry. : 

Safety record, 1197 
Service order fixing standards of operation, 

961 
United Railways: 

Annual report, 481 

Children's tickets, 260 

Comj^romise of tax suit suggested, 1129 

Earnings decrease, 253 

Eliminating stops, 1136 

Employees' magazine, 260 

First home built under loan plan, 863 

Headlight tests, 639 

Manganese steel crossings [ Hawkins] , 
c892 

Mill-tax case, 112, 151, 349 

Mill-tax decision. Opinion of Judge 
Walker, 70 

Pension plan, 78 

Rapid transit hearing, 204 

Service inquiry, 77 

Signs in cars, 77 

Welfare work, 487 
Salem, Ore: 
Portland, Eugene & Eastern Railway: 

One-man cars, 1136 



1136 
1030 



Terminal 



Salt Lake City: 

Salt Lake & Ogden Ry. : 

Steel tie construction in electrically 
warmed concrete [Bamberger], *189 

High-tension direct-current system. De- 
tails of, *54 
Utah Securities Corporation takes over prop- 
erties, 435 
San Antonio, Tex. : 
San Antonio Traction Company; 

Advertising band concerts. 

Track construction [Smith], 
San Diego, Cal. : 
Panama-California Exposition, 

facilities, *587 
San Diego Elec. Ry., Division of accident 

savings among employes, 818 
San Francisco: 

Accident on Fillmore Street hill, 1137 

California Railway & Power Co. 

Annual report, 436 
Central California Traction Company. Lease 

to Stockton Electric Railroad, 688 

■ Jitney bus, 256, 648 

Municipal Railway : 

Annual report, 687, 1221 

Earnings and expenses during 1914, 
1004 

Examination of emiiloyees, 355 

Extensions, 433, 1222 

Geary Street carhouse enlarged, 667 

Stockton Street line, 112 

Ocean Shore R. R., Assessment, 816 

Pacific Gas & Electric Co.: 

Bond issue, 816 

Redemption of notes, 732 

Stock distribution, 115 

Stock dividend, 1180, 1004 

Public relations [ Lilienthal] , 150 

Southern Pacific Co., Rate case, 120, 260 

Street traffic signal, *671 

Transfers between Municipal Ry. and United 

Railroads, 605 
Transportation facilities during Exposition, 

259 
United Railroads: 

Attitude to^vard the municipal railway, 
250 

Commission finds deficit, 1003 

lixperiences [Lilienthal], 150, 398 

Low-floor, California type car, *1016 

Policy as to extensions and improve- 
ments, 200 

Protest against Municipal Ry's schedule, 
1136 

Two-car trains on 25% grade, *977, 1137 
San Francisco-Oakland Terminal Rys. (See Oak- 
land, Cal.) 
Sand-spreading wagon for slippery pavement 

(Havass), 300 
Sand, experiences with, Chicago, Ottawa & Peoria 

Ry. [Carr], 143 
Sand Tracks: 
Sand trough for stopping runaway cars on 

L. & W. V. Ry., *706 
Sanford, Me., Atlantic Shore Electric Ry. 

Fare changes, 159 

Santa Barbara (Cal.) & Suburban Ry,: 

Car-door operation [Lloyd], *590 

Saskatoon, Can. : 

Sale of municipal railway proposed, 304 

Sault Ste. Marie, Mich, : 

Preventing condensation in under-water con- 
duit [Koppel], *296 
Saving power (See Energy consumption) 
Schedules and Time Tables: 
Application of traffic statistics to service 

[Doolittle], *928 

Preparing time schedules [SJoss], 795 

Schedule speed in city service. Importance 

of high speed, 29 

Schedule speed, Neglected factor, 742 

Scientific car schedules, Comment, 700 

Short headways. Advantages shown by 

jitney, 967 
Schenectady, N. Y. : 

General Elec. C!o. 

Schenectady Ry, : 

Fare schedule. 

Rush-hour methods, 30 
Scranton, Pa.: 
Lackawanna & Wyoming Valley Railroad : 

Sand stop for runaway cars, *706 
Scranton Railway: 

Experience meetings, 735, 818 

Extension ordinance annulled, 1227 
Scrap material. Handling and selling [Alex- 
ander], 245 
Scrap metals. Sales of [Alexander], 192; 

[Yungbluth], c 381 
Seating capacity of cars. Law limiting, Toronto, 

399; (See also Loading limits for cars) 
Seats: 

— —New York Municipal Railway cars. *877 
Removable, collapsible for motorman (Elec- 
tric Service Supplies), *I126 
Seattle, Wash.: 

Jitney bus, 649 

Seattle Municipal Railway: 

Accident at power plant, 952 

Bond issue questioned. 770 

Carhouse [Kennedy], *513 

Cost of operation, 816 

Double trolley system, [Kennedy], *128 

Financial difficulties, 431. 480, 598 

lipase plan defeated, 1219 

Legal difficulties, 111 

Mayor's veto on bond issue, 198 



Annual report, 
355 



814 



(Abbreviations : *lllustrated. c Correspondence.) 



Seattle, Wash.: 

Seattle Municipal Ry. : (Continued) 

Keport for six months, 201 
Right to operate, 523 
Sale or lease suggested, 1 1 78 
Sale rejected, 72 

Municipal motor-bus fund, 199 

Puget Sound Traction, Light & Power Co.: 

Change in street grade, *832 

Jitney bus issue, 1093 

Seattle-Everett fare reduction, 119, 311 

Service order, 77, 776, 1094 

Strike avoided, 767 

Wallingford case, 819 

Seattle, Renton & Southern Ry. : 

Fare case. 820 
Purchase postponed, 434 
Right-of-way condemnation proceedings 
abandoned, 728 

Selling of car wheels, rails and scrap iron 
[Alexander], 245 

Shelters (See Waiting Stations) 

Signal cord bushing. Fiber (Pahler), 248 

Signals: 

Attaching signal wires to third-rail [Mc- 
Kelway], *1038 

Automatic flagman [Brach], 806 

Block system: 

Cab signals, British view of, 125 
Illinois Traction System. Installations 

of 1914 [Leisenring], *408 
Installation for city service in South 

Bend, Ind, (Nachod), *1127 
Interlocking installation on Pacific Elec- 
tric Railway (General Railway Sig- 
nal Co), *946 
Maintenance methods. New York, West- 
chester & Boston Ry., *S61; Com- 
ment, 539 
Statistics for 1914. 18; Comment, 5 

Car stop and start. United Railway, St. 

Louis, 652 

Control of Street Railway Signal Co. by 

Electric Service Supplies Co,, 680 

Highway-crossing protection. Report of Il- 
linois Electric Railways Association, 
*174; Comment, 165 

Light: 

Self-contained blocks^ Illinois Traction 
System [Leisenring] , *409 

Outdoor substations for, *807 

Reports at Railway Signal Association 

meeting. 582 

Semaphore and automatic whistle for street 

traffic, San Francisco, *671 

Speed control system: 

New York Municipal Railway cars, 878 

Steam railroad statistics, 138 

Testing signal circuits, 1023 

Signs on cars: 

Destination signs, Legal difficulties in Chi- 
cago, 77 

Illuminated guide signs in England, *473 

Illuminated, with car and run numbers in 

Los Angeles [Stephens], 1169 

Street and station indicator, Los Angeles. 

Cal,, 67 

Tail-light or classification light box, Rock- 
ford, HI. [Graham], *424 

"We" slogan sign, Kentucky Traction & 

Terminal Co. [Bacon], c*292 

Single-phase railways: 

Conversion to d. c. operation without inter- 
ruption of service, Annapolis Short 
Line. *542 

Operating results on New Haven, 229 

Progress in a. c. electrification, 10 

Prussian State Railways, Silesian electri- 
fication, *666 

Vienna-Pressburg railway. Choice of sys- 
tem, inductive interference, rolling 
stock, *830 

Snow removal: 

Cincinnati suggestions, 259 

Clearing an under-running third rail. New 

York State Rys. [Hinman]. *469 

Snow-sweeper with out-board broom. New 

York Rys., *320; Comment, 317 

Vienna, Austria, Use of trailer wagons 

]SpangIer], *591 

Society for Electrical Development: 

— Electrical prosperity week organization, 686 

South American trade. Consular recommenda- 
tions on, 463 

South Ben-d, Ind.: 

Chicago. South Bend & Northern Indiana 

Ry.: 

Signals for city service, *1127 

Southern Pacific Co. (See San Francisco) 

Southwestern Electrical and Gas Association: 

Convention, 1025 

Mid-winter meeting, 323 

Program plans, 495 

Puestion box, 1070 

Specifications, Preparation of, Bay State Street 
Ry., 90 

Speed indicator, electrical (E.sterline Co.), *897 

Speed indicator, recording (Holtzer-Cabot), 852 

Speed of cars (See Schedules and time tables) 

Speyer, Sir Edward, Retirement, 1176 

Spokane, Wash.: 

^Washington Water Power Company: 

Appraisal, 727 

Springfield, Mass. : 

Springfield Street Railway: 

Arbitration with employees, 727 
Electrolysis report, 507 
. Strike, 684, 812, 901, 950, 1000 

Springfield, Mo.: 

• Springfield Gas & Elec. Co., Rate case, 110 



January- June, 1915.] 



INDEX. 



XIII 



Springfield, Ohio: 

SpringfieM Ry. : 

Repair shops and carhouse, *356 

Starting resistance (.See Motors) 

Staten Island Midland Railway (New York City) 
Stationery forms, economy in, 753 

Statistics: 

Cars ordered in 1914, 16; Comment, 12 

Census report electric railways. Relation of 

traffic to population, distribution of in- 
come, classification of track mileage, pri- 
vate right-of-way, 96, 131 

Center of purchases and center of popula- 
tion, 166 

Coal and metal production in 1914, 92 

Economic conditions employees, Bay State 

Street Railway. *708 

Electric railway earnings in 1914, 815; Com- 
ments, 783 

Electric railway monthly earnings, 647, 690, 

732, 774, 816, 861, 908, 957, 1005, 1047, 
1133, 1181, 1223 

Express companies, 323 

— Figures of Bureau of Fare Research (four 

months), 183; Comment, 269 

Indiana railways [Duncan], 456 

Indianapolis terminal station traffic, 440 

Milwaukee Electric Railway & Light Com- 
pany, 645 

Operating statistics of the New Haven Road, 

230, 231 

■ Passenger car orders since 1908, 644 

Passengers carried and accidents to passen- 
gers in New York, 134 

• Rail production in United States, 832 

Receiverships and foreclosure sales in 1914, 

19 

Signals installed during 1914. 18; Com- 
ment; 5 

■ Steam railroads, Report of Interstate Com- 
merce Commission, 755 

Track built in 1914, 14; Comment, 12 

Wages of different industries, 726 

Steel, Carbon-Vanadium forging (American 
Vanadium Co.), 1126 

Steel construction, Terminology for [Keen], 
c290 

Stopping of cars: 

Cleveland, Skip-stop, 205 

l>etroit, Mich., 311 

Indianapolis, Stops on both sides of street, 

311 

Influence of skip-stop on schedule speed, 

742 

Milwaukee, Wis.. Skip-stop, 205 

Near-side stop, List of cities with, 31 

Ordinance in Springfield, Mo., 1184 

Reduction in number of stops in St. Louis, 

1136 

Storage battery cars: 

Pall bearings, Value of [Farr], *344 

Third Avenue Ry., Ampere-hour meters on 

cars. 593 

Strikes: 

Chicago, 111., *n65; Comment, 1142, 1189 

Detroit United Railway. 951, 998; Com- 
ments, 969 

-Fast Liverpool, 522 

■ In London, 998: Comment. 968 

Springfield Street Railway, 684, 812 

Syracuse, Empire United Railways, 726, 

767: Comment, 783 

Wilkes-Barre, 726, 856 

Subsidized extensions of street railway tracks in 
Cleveland, 951 

Substations: 

.Annapolis Short Line, *546 

Norfolk & Western Railroad, *1064 

Outdoor, Covington, Va. (Transmission Eng. 

Co.), *519 

Portable substations, Pittsburgh Railways 

Company, *1039 

Rating of equipment, Comment, 1142, 1191 

Reclosing circuit breaker (Automatic Re- 
closing Circuit- Breaker Co.), 996 

Semi-outdoor portable, Berkshire Street Ry., 

*56 

Switches: 

— — Double-throw horn-gap (Railway 
trial Engineering Co.), *475 

Series trip for high -voltage oil 

(General Electric), *343 
Switzerland: 

Montreaux-Oberland Ry: 

Ball bearings, *808 
Syndicated Anti-railway news, 
449; I Waters], c 586 
Syracuse, N. Y. : 

Empire United Railway: 

Arbitration with employees, 999 
Strike, 726, 767 

New York State Rys. : 

Manganese steel crossings [Roundey], 

892 
Training platform recruits, *704 
Way records [ Roundey] 



Indus- 
switches 



*462; Comment, 



*945 



Tacoma, Wash.: 

Puget Sound Electric Ry.: 

Fare change, 77 

Short municipal lines open, 199 

Tanks: 

Rustless steel (Dover Boiler Works). 949 

Tatra Ry., Hungary, 1650-voIt d.c. line, 248 



Taxation: 

Indiana railway statistics for 1914, 53 

Principles of, 784 

Real significance, 925 

Refunding illegal collection in Ohio, 770 

Wisconsin, EfiFect of increase in taxes upon 

public service companies [Gruhl], 234 
Taxicabs: 

(Operating costs, 621 

Technical journal, Reading of [Cooper], c716 
Temperature measurements using metallic salts 

(Nehls Alloy Co.), 106 
Terre Haute, Indianapolis & Eastern (See In- 
dianapolis, Ind) 
Testing equipment: 

Portable lamp bank [Hinman], *513 

(See also Motors) 

Texas: 

__ — Interurban consolidation bill passed, 1088 
Texas Traction Company (See Dallas, Tex.) 
Third Rails: 

Construction of 2400-volt line, Michigan 

Railway. *1146 
Cable-end bell (Electrical Engineers Equip- 
ment Co.), *343 . 
High-voltage third-rail construction. Sug- 
gested type [Tracy], *469 _ 

Snow removal from under-running third 

rail, New York State Rys. [Hinman], 
*469 
Ticket-printing machine at victoria station, 

London, *473 
Ties: 

Calculating total annual cost, 570 

Pine ties reused after service of 21 years, 

Brooklyn Rapid Transit Co. [Cram], 
295 

—Steel, Laid in electrically warmed concrete, 

Salt Lake City [Bamberger], *189 

-Treated, Costs and methods of handling, 182 

■ ■ -Treating plant on Boston & Worcester Street 
Ry.. *678 

Trough-shaped steel [Cambria], *766 _ 

(See also Northern White Cedar Association) 
Timber preservation: 

A. R. E. A. report, 570 

Creosote sources in U. S., 332 ^ 

Discussions at American Wood Preservers 

Association. 181, 237 

Treating plant on Boston & Worcester Street 

Ry., *678 
Titanium (See Rails) 
Toledo, Ohio: 

Contempt cases, 251, 1088 

litney bus, 649 

^^Municipal ownership discussion, 856, 1042 

Toledo, Fostoria & Findlay Railway: 

Light-weight steel cars, 947 

Toledo Railways & Light: 

Bond issue of city for purchase of rail- 
way, 390 
Franchise matters, 109, 149, 643, 728, 769, 
1087, 1220 
Topeka, Kan.: 

Topeka Street Ry.: 

Passes discontinued, 119 
Toronto, Canada: 

Board of control and the transportation 

problem. 251 

-Municipal ownership suggestions, 1130 

Rapid transit plans, 598 

Regulatory bills rejected, 687 

Toronto Railway: 

Car capacity controversy, 399, 533 
Decision on type of cars, 1136 
Extensions, 249 
Fender test, 391 

Service extension controversy. 198, 347, 
392, 903, 1094, 1176, 1183 
Track construction: 

By contractor or way department? [Gaus- 

mann], 895 

Cost details, Buffalo, 135 

]')eveIopment in 1914, 7 

Flange-bearing special work [Graves, An- 

gerer, Wilson], c 1034 [Mitchell] c 1119 

In paved streets [Brown], 1028 

Faying out a compound curve. Two ways 

[StreizhefT], *426 
— — Manganese special work: 

Experience of several companies on 

Pacific Coast. 576 
Specifications, 1118 
Standard composition, 755 

Mysterious derailments [Williams], 1078 

Non-splashing electric switch. 1083, 1127 

Crane car. Third Ave. Ry. [Ryder], 763 

Rail-layinff outfit, Kankakee & Urbana Trac- 

• tion Co. [Shelton], *242 

San Antonio Traction Company [Smith], 

1030 

Shockless railroad crossing, Pacific Electric 

Railway, *994 

Special-work shop [Gausmann], *992 

— —Statistics of 1914 for United States and 

C^anada, 14; Comment, 12 
Steel ties laid in electrically warmed con- 
crete. Salt Lake City [Bamberger]. *189 
Track maintenance: 

Flange-bearing special work beneficial, 871 

Folding box for arc welding to protect pub- 
lic [Williams], *847 

Joint repairs [Gausmann], 803 

Life of open-hearth steel rails compared with 

manganese steel, on curves, Brooklyn 
Rapid Transit Co. fBernard], 383 

^ 'fe of way structure [Wilson], *1212 

Manganese-steel crossings in Chicago, *7I1 

(Abbreviations: •Illustrated, c Corresjwndence.) 



Comment, 
& Kansas 



Track Maintenance: (Continued) 

Pine ties reused after service of 21 years, 

Brooklyn Rapid Transit Co. [Cram], 

295 

Real economy in, 1015 

Records on cost-per-section basis [ Hulett] , 

*669 
Records on New York State Railways, 

Syracuse lines [Roundey], *945 
Result of neglect [Fuller], 791; Comments, 

1065 
Shop equipment needed to turn out special 

work [Gausmann], 992 
Special manganese steel crossings [Haw- 
kins, I Roundey], c 892 
Special work on steel structure, Muncie, 

Ind., Maintenance record, *68 

Tools, supplies and appliances [Cram], 1169 

Way dei)artment rule book to promote 

standard practice, Chicago, Ottawa & 

Peoria Ry., 89 
Way records on cost per-section basis 

I Fa.coner |, c 1035 
— —Weed cutter [Griffithsl, *1121 
Trackless trolleys: 

Considered in Pennsylvania, 150, 304 

In Shanghai, China, 592 

Traffic Surveys: 

Importance of [Emery], c 1119 

Organization [I')oolittle], 1160; 

1141 
Schemes in Pittsburgh, Boston 

City. 27 
Traffic characteristics: 

Construction of models fDoolittle], cl077 

Statistical measurements [Doolittle], *926; 

Comments, 917 
Traffic Control: 
Semaphore signals with automatic whistles, 

*671 
Recommendations of Safety First Federa- 
tion of America, 1137 
Traffic Investigations, Cities: 

Detroit, 594, 664 
Traffic, Rush-hour; 
Front-end conductors for congested points, 

31 
Prizes for relief suggestions. New York 

Municipal Art Society, 1051 

Relieving congestion in various cities, 30 

Trailers: 

List of cities using, 31 

Operation in Rochester, N. Y., *752 

Train resistance (See Power Consumption.) 
Transfers: 

Cost of printing, 704 

Printing plant of Third Ave. Railway, *702 

Privileges in Lawrence Transfer Case, 651 

Transformers, signal light (General Electric), *67 

Transmission Lines : 

■ "Linemen as tightwire walkers," Portland, 

Me., *I93 
Linemen s searchlights, Buffalo, Lockport 

& Rochester Ry., *472 

Mechanical cable connections [Fargo], *1216 

Mechanical and heating effects of short 

circuits. Reactance to limit [Gross], 132; 
Comment, 127 
—< — Norfolk & Western Railroad, *1064 
Underground construction, Report of N. E. 

L. A. (fommittee, 1107 
Transportation, United States department recom- 
mended by Howard Elliot, 741 
Tri-City Railway & Light Company. (See 

Davenport, la.) 
Tri-State Electric & Ry. Co. (See East Liver- 
pool, Ohio.) 
Trolley retrievers and catchers (Sterling), *343 
Trolley- wheel oil-less bushings and non-arcing 

harps ( More Jones) , *474 
Trolley wire, location on curves [Foster], •62, 

•105 
Trolley wire pick-up. Lehigh Valley Transit Co. 

[Branson], *295 
Trucks : 

Angularity on curves, ^1079 

■ Maximum traction (Taylor Elec. Truck Co.), 

•1126 
Tucson, Ariz.: 

One-man cars sanctioned, 1049 

Tulsa, Okla,: 

Tulsa Street Railway, One-man cars, 1136 

Turbo-generators and Equipment: 

Arrangement of piping at remodeled 74th 

Street Station, Interborough Rapid 
Transit Co., 746 
— ' — Auxiliaries for new Havana power station, 

•923 

Losses in steam turbines, 785 

Tuscaloosa, Ala.: • 
Birmingham-Tuscaloosa Railway & Utilities 

Co.. Opening. 391 
Twin City Rapid Transit Co. (See Minneapolis, 

Minn.) 



U 



Union Electric Co. (See Dubuque, la.) 

Union Pacific R.R.: 

Gasoline-driven train (McKeen), *1215 

Union Traction Company of Indiana (See An- 
derson, Ind.) 

United Lt. & Rys. Co. (See Grand Rapids, 
Mich.) 

United Traction Co. (See Albany, N. Y.) 

Urbana, 111.: 

Kankakee & Urbana Traction Co., Rail-laying 

outfit tShelton], *242 



XIV 



INDEX. 



[Vol. XLV. 



Urbana, 111.: (Continued) 

Urbana & Champaign Railway, Gas & Elec- 
tric Co., Bond issue, 647 
Utah Public Utilities proposed, 252 



Valuation (See Appraisal) 

Vancouver, B. C. : 

British Columbia Electrrc Ky. 

Annual report, 393 

l^are reduction, 959 

Fireproof carhouse, *227 
Vancouver, Wash. : 
Washington-Oregon Corporation : 

Keorganizaton, 954 
Vehicular obstruction, Relieving, 29 
Vending machine for electric cars [Drum], *388 
Ventilation of cars, Chicago ordinance, 120 
Vienna (See Austria) 
Virginia Railway & Power Co. (See Richmond, 

Va.) 
Voltmeter measurements of direct current. Table 

[McKelway], 341; C!orrections, 427 



W 



•33 



Waiting stations and shelters: 

Practice in various cities, 

Walworth, Wis.: 

Chicago, Harvard & Geneva Lake Railway, 

Bond issue, 689 
War: 

Eflfect on railways in Berlin, 729, 813 

Washington, D. C: 

Capital Traction Company: 

Annual report, 730 

Mating of gears and pinions [Dal- 
gleish], 942 
City & Suburban Ry., Change in zone sys- 
tem denied, 311 

Conductors required on trailers, 605 

Consolidation plans for street railways, 1223 

Grosser bill in Congress, 112, 199 

Merger of street railways, 305 

Potomac Electric Power Co.: 

Christmas entertainment, 119 

Trailers, Hearing on, 355 

■ Washington, Berwin & Laurel Electric Ry.: 

Fare zone petition denied, 78 
Washington & Maryland Ry.: 

Valuation, 732 



Washington, D. C; (Continued) 

— —Washington & Old Dominion Ry.: 

Decision on delayed delivery of material, 
1177 
Washington Railway & Electric Company: 

Annual report, 771 

Bond issue, 690 

Christmas entertainment, 119 

Company section, Meeting, 419 

Protit-shanng results, 157 

Washington Utilities Co., Note offering, 816 

Waste paper baling: 

Equi])ment, *66 

Methods [ Youngbluth], c 239 

Waste, Trade-marked, standardized waste (Royal 

Mfg. Co.), 1174 
Waterloo, Iowa: 
Waterloo-Cedar Falls & Northern Uaihvay: 

Steel parlor cars, *932 
Welding, special methods: 
Dangers of welding worn wheel uanges 

[Hayes], c*942; Comment, 917 

Folding box to guard public [Williams], *847 

Oxy-acetylene equipment (Imperial Brass), 

*517 

Oxy-acetylene weld on large casting, *898 

Portable arc-welding outfit on line car, *n23 

• Restoring worn wheel-flanges [Murphy], 719 

Wendelstein Ry. (See Germany) 

West Jersey & Seashore Railroad: 

Lease to Pennsylvania R. R. not approved. 

Commission upheld by courts, 903 
West Virginia: 
Public Service Commission appointments, 

1129 

Public Utility Association organized, 953 

Western Association of Electrical Inspectors, 

Convention, 285 
Western Red Cedar Association : 

^Annual meeting, 180 

Western Society of P-ngineers: 

Electrification discussed, 579 

Westinghouse Electric & Mfg. Co.: 

Absorbs Westinghouse Machine Co., 7i 

Annual report, 1002 

Wheaton, 111., Aurora, Elgin & Chicago R. R.: 

Oil-saving filler for motor-axle cap. *66 

Wheel grinder: 

Inexpensive tvpe (Wheel-Truing Brakeshoe 

Co.), *1175 
Wheels: 

Cause of thick & thin flanges [Lloyd], 1037 

Derailments from worn flanges [Williams], 

*1037 
Welding worn flanges [Murphy], •719; Dan- 
ger of [Hayes], *942; Comment, 917 



Wilkes-Barre, Pa. : 
Wilkes-Barre Ry. : 

Center-entrance cars, *518. *593 

Strike, 151, 726, 856, 1049 
Willoughby, Ohio : 
Cleveland, PainesviUe & Eastern Railroad: 

Annual report, 905 
Wilson, President. Address at convention of 

American Electric Railway Association, 

217, 275; Comments of the press, 27.8; 

Opinions [Shonts, Williams, Budd, 

Clark, Cummings], c 290 
Window cleaner, Fixed squeegee for vestibuled 

cars. Third Avenue Ry. [Johnson], *339 
Winnipeg, Can.: 

Service order, 525 

Stopping of cars, 159 

Winnipeg Electric Railway: 

Annual report, 687 

Reduction in dividend, 690 

Service reduction, 819 
Winona (Minn.) Ry. : 
One-man car. Experience with [Howard], 

*233; Comment, 212 
Wiring cars: 

Change in code recommended^ 285 

Wisconsin Electrical Association: 
— ■ — Convention proceedings, 232 
Wisconsin Railway, Light & Power Co. (See 

Milwaukee, Wis.) 
Wood, Treatment (See Timber Preservation) 
Worcester, Mass. : 
■ Worcester C^^onsolidated Street Ry. : 

Equipment cost data, 427 
Workmen's compensation (See Employees, Insur- 
ance) 



Yonkers (N. Y.) Ry.: 

— — Near-side stop, 819 

Voungstown, Ohio : 

■ — —Mahoning & Shenango Valley Railway & 

Light Co. : 

Company publication, 158 

Freight rates, 311 

Increase in wages, 735 



ZanesTiUe, Ohio: 

— — Southeastern Ohio Railway, Light & Power 

Company: 

Receiver appointed, 956 



AUTHOR INDEX 



Adams, H. H. Motor ventilation, c 990 
Alexander, J. P. Handling of scrap material, 
245 

Sales of scrap metals, 192 

Allen, C. L. Address at mid-year meeting, 280 
Allen, W. L. Railway motor gearing, 1201 
Angerer, V. Flange-bearing special work, 1034 
Archbold, W. K. The Vienna-Pressburg elec- 
trification, 989 
Arthur, William. Filing of technical literature. 
c511 

Locomotive design, c 1209 

Austin, George E. Comments on insulating 

tape, 888 
Bacon, F. W. The "We" slogan sign, c *292 



B 



Bamberger, J. M. Steel tie construction in 
electrically- warmed concrete, *189 

Bancroft, William A. Zone system of fares, c 890 

Barnes, J. P. What constitutes good and suffi- 
cient maintenance? 467 

Baugher, E. C. Feeder-tap resistance in ro- 
tary-converter practice, c 799 

Beagle, N. R. Chemical department of Illinois 
Traction System, 433 

Bennett, H. K. Making the safety movement 
permanent, c 717 

Bernard, M. Car life of plain curves, 383 

Berry, V, W. Economical limit of the repair 
, shop, 1027 

Blackburn, A. A. Recruiting car at Belfast, 

Bradlee, Henry G. Investment per passenger, 

c987 
Branson. Harry. Brackets for carrying lifting 

jack under side sill, *191 

Trolley wire pick-up, *295 

Brown, B. R. Track construction in paved 

streets, 1028 
Brownell, H. L. "Safety First for You and 

Me,*' 749 
Brush, M. C. Brass band in the safety move- 
ment, c 845 
Buck, A. M. Proportioning of railway motor 

resistances, *330 

Time element in controller notching, c "672 

Budd, B. I. The President's address, c 290 
Burritt. E. B. Washington conference and 

dinner, 187 



Cadle, C. L. National electrical safety code, 

c 1036 
Cameron, G. M. Calculation of starting re- 
sistances for railway motors, c 238 
Carr^ W. F. Railway sand experience, 143 
Castiglioni, F. Chart for use in transforming 
motor speed curves for different volt- 
ages, *515 

Starting resistance for railway motors, 

c 336, c381 
Chubbuck, O. P. Coil-winding unit, *12!3 
Clark, James S. Car-load freight on small 

lines, 1114 
Clark, W. T. The President's address, c 290 
Cole, W. W. Causes of corrosion of under- 
ground structures, c 186 
Cooley, M. E. Engineers and public service, 1158 
Cooper, H. S. Mating gears and pinions, c 890 
■ "Mixing" as an asset of public utility busi- 
ness. 842 

Reading a technical journal, c 716 

Coors, W. F. Graphic commercial progression 
method for starting- resistance calcula- 
tions, *761 
Corning, J. W. Effects of incorrect starting 

resistances, c *93 
Cram, R. C. Track tools, supplies and appli- 
ances, 1169 

^Use of old pine ties, 295 

Warning signs to protect paving work in 

tracks under traffic, *893 
Crecelius, L. P. Feeder-top resistance in ro- 
tary-converter practice, c 799 

National electrical safety code, c 941 

Crosby, O. T. Code of principles, c 370 
Cummings, J. J. The President's address, c 290 
Gushing, W. F. Publicity by public utility com- 
missions, c 58 



D 

Dalgleish. R. H. Notes on gears and pinions, 

•942 
Dana^ Edward. Dispatching city cars, *802 

■ Graphic comparisons of accidents, *58 

Decamp, H. C, Human element on electric rail- 
ways, 1157 
Donovan, t. C. Commutator soldering torch, 

•1079 
Doolittle, F. W. Traffic characteristics. *926, 
C1077 

^(Abbreviations: 'IHustrated. c Correspondence.) 



Doolittle, F. W. Organizing the traffic survey, 

1160 
Duncan, Thomas. Regulation and railway rates, 

456 



Earle, S. C. Bettering the use of English, c 94 
Edmunds, V. L. Registration of fares, c 716 
Emery, J. A. Traffic characteristics and invest- 
"ment per revenue passenger, c 1119 



Falconer, D. P. Way records on a cost per 
section basis, c 1035 

Farlow, W. B. Low-floor California-type car, 
1016 

Feustel, Robert M. Investment per passenger, 
c 1077 

Fisher, D. G. Presidential address. South- 
western Association. 1027 

Fisher, Dr. H. E. Chicago Elevated Ry. medical 
methods, *1192 

Fitch. G. r.. Power dispatching, *470 

Foote, F. J. Methods of testing for short cir- 
cuits in field coils, *64 

Foster, S. L. Location of trolley wire on 
curves, *62, *105. 142. 191. *244 

Fox, Ralph. Baffle plate for motor axle bearing 
caps, *424 

Fuller, Carl H. Deferred maintenance, 791 



Ganz. A. F. Corrosion of metals in natural 
soils, c 420 

Gansmann, S. Joint repairs, *803 

— ■ — Methods and costs of concreting modern 
pavement, 718 

Special-work shop for electric railways, *992 

— — -Track work by contractor or way depart- 
ment? 895 

George. F. K. Results of safety work, 794 

George, S. G. (See Rettger, E. W.) 

Gibbs, George. Electrification of the Norfolk 
& Western Railway, 581 

Gove Wm. G. Testing railway motor insula- 
tion, c 1119 

Graham, J. N. Forming blocks for motor case 
bolts, *296. 

Illuminated train-number box, *341 



January-June, 1915.] 



INDEX. 



XV 



Tail-light or classification light box, "424 

Graves, W. F. Flange-bearing special work, 
c 1034 

Griffiths, R. E. Northern Texas Traction weed 
cutter, *1121 

Gruhl. Edwin. Increased taxation in Wiscon- 
sin and its effect upon public service 
companies, 234 



H 



Hanna, J. H. National electrical safety code, 
c 1036 

Harding, C. F. Calculation of starting resist- 
ances for railway motors, c 186 

Education and the code of principles, c 58 

Harte, Charles Rufus. The Vienna-Pressburg 
electrification, c 989 

Harvie, W. J. Bureau of Standards' safety 
rules, c 758 

Hawkins, C. L. Recent manganese steel cross- 
ings, c 892 

Hayes, Morgan D. Danger of welding processes 
as applied to tires and wheels, *942 ^ 

Hellmund. Rudolph E. Advantage and limita- 
tions of railway motor ventilation, *833 

Hemming, R. N. Accounting and mechanical de- 
partments, 1153 

Henderson, G, R. Important factors in steam 
railway electrification, c 380 

Hewes, J. E. Collection and registration of 
city and interurban fares. 466 

Hinman, F. L. Portable lamp bank for equip- 
ment tests, *513 

Removing snow from under-running third 

rail, *469 

Restoring: loaded freight cars to side bear- 
ings in rounding short curves, *425 

Hixson. L. T. Analyzing the balance sheet, 
1112 

Howard, R. M. Experience with one-man elec- 
tric car in small city, *233 

Hulett, Frank W. Way records on cost per 
section basis, 669 

Hemming, R. N. Relation between accounting 
and mechanical departments, 1153 

Hunter, E. H. Fuel values of coal, oil and 
gas, 984 



Jackson. D. C. Teachers and the industry, c 93 
Jenkins, J. R. Removable ash-pit for black- 
smith forges, *425 
Johnson, A, R, Case-hardened collar and weld- 
ing reclaim worn button-end axles, *294 

■ Fixed sqneegee for vestibuled cars, *339 

Knife guard for jointer or hand planer, "SOS 

• Sandbox opened by fender trip, *106 

Johnson, J. J. The jitney situation, 985 



Katte, E. B. Maintenance costs on the New 

York Central Railroad, 580 
Keen, C. G. Semi-steel cars in collision, c *715 

Terminology for steel construction, c 290 

Keller, C. L. Locomotive and trail cars in De- 
troit, United freight service, *848 

Machine for grinding home-made grids, "64 

Kennedy, H. J. Carhouse of Seattle Municipal 
Railway. *513 

Double trolley system in Seattle, *128 

Kingsbury, N. C. Public service and publicity, 

223 
Koehler, C. H. Meters and men, p"633 
Koppel, J. G. Ground wire alarm, *144 

Home-made junction box, *383 

Hydraulic jack for pinion removal, •1039 

Preventing condensation in under- water 

conduit, *296 

Slotting commutators in the motor shell, 

*847 



Laney, C. J. Is the handling of free baggage 
a traffic error, 412 

Lawson. A. J. Tramways in the United King- 
dom, Analysis of operating results, 929 

Lawson, George. Results obtained by instruc- 
tion department of New York State 
Railways, Rochester lines, 367 

Layng, J. F. Economies in operating small cars, 
*979 

Leisenring, John. Signaling on the Illinois 
Traction System. *408 

Leonhauser, IL A. Maintenance cost reduction 
by proper handling of equipment and 
departmental co-operation, 384 

Lewis, A. P. Checking air gap by solder spots, 
893 

— — Eliminating frills to reduce paint cost, 847 

Home-made cast-iron axle bearing, *760 

Testing motors for electrical and mechani- 
cal conditions, 1037 

Lewis, E. L. The jitney bus in Los Angeles. 
c 757 



Litchfield, Norman. Recording progress in con- 
struction of cars and assembly of 
equipment, *ii9 

Lloyd, J. N. Car-door operation with sprocket 
chain and worm shaft, *590 

Lloyd, M. M. Cause of thick and thin wheel 
flanges, 1037 



M 



McGrath, D. J. Investment required per pas- 
senger. 881 

McAloney, W. H. Mating gears and pinions, 
c990 

— — Uniformity in car colors, c 468 

Working ordinary and hard gears and 

pinions together, *803 

McColIum, Burton. (See Rosa, E. P.) 

Mclntire, J. B. Engineering considerations in 
a proposed line, c 799 

McKelway. G. H. Attaching signal wires to 
third-rail, *1038 

-— — Dead-ending feeders to metal poles, *143 

— — Safe and unsafe way of cutting concrete, 
*993 

Voltmeter measurements of direct current, 

341 

Meriwether, Richard. Welfare and educational 
work among employees. 1029 

Mitchell, L. A. Flange-bearing special work, 
c 1119 

Mills, John F. Investigating and handling auto- 
mobile accidents, 1203 

Moyer, J. A. Future central station develop- 
ment, c 987 

Mulder, H. J. Maximum motor input, c 511 

Murphy, F. A. Restoring steel wheel flanges 
with a welder, *719 

Muskat, Carl. Wisconsin's compensation law, 234 



N 



Neereamer, A, L. Report of secretary-treasurer 
of Central Electric Railway Association, 
413 

Nottage, C. II. Electric railway freight in Maine, 
1213 



Palm, C. I. The jitney bus, 795 
Palmer, L. R. Organized safetv, 936 
Palmer, W. K. Value of published costs, c 845 
Parshall. H. F. Motor overloads and flashing, 

c57 
Parsons, R. H. Block to protect switch blades of 
type-K controllers, *386 

Home-made saw for light tubing, commutator 

bars, etc., *849 

Oil bath tank, *65 

Painters* putty and shellac for repairing con- 
troller division plates, 470 

Pointers on the installation and removal of 

pinions, 638, *674 

Power reel for cars, trucks, etc., *894 

■ Use of gas flame in removing pinions, c 988 

Ventilating scheme for increasing motor out- 
put, *n70 
Phillips, W. H. Mating gears and pinions, c891 
Phillips, F. R. Ventilated motors, c 1209 
Pontecorvo, G. Italian three-phase electrifica- 
tions, *450 

Three-phase Italian passenger locomotives, 

*283 
Price, E. C. Track joining and bonding, 1156 
Priest, Edward D. Self-ventilated railway 

motors, c 891 
Purtee, L. G'. Fuel values of rnal, oil and gas, 
984 



Quick, Howard P. The passing of a great engi- 
neer— Dr. F. S. Pearson, c 988 



Roundey, E. P. Recent manganese steel cross- 
ings, c 892 

Way records, *945 

Ryder, E. M. T. Crane car for track work, 763 



Saunders, George B. Utility appraisals, 984 

Schneider, E. F. Making the safety movement 
permanent, c 800 

Scott, Charles B. Making the safety movement 
permanent, c 801 

See, P. V, Painting cars in two days, *584 

Relay setting to maintain uniform accelera- 
tion, *76I 

Shelton, T. W. Rail-laying outfit on the Kanka- 
kee & Urbana Traction Co., *242 

Sherwood, E. C. The three-in-one car, *1121 

Shonts, T. P. The President's address, c 290 

Simmon, K. A. Calculations of starting resist- 
ances for railway motors, c 238 

Skelly. F. V. Railway return circuits, 794 

Slater, F. R. Advertising influence of the em- 
ployee, 1029 

Sloss, L. L. Time schedule, 795 

Small, Oren A. Electric light and power account- 
ing, 1113 

Smith, Charles H. Feeder-tap protection and 
care of commutators, 827 

Smith, G. W. Track re-construction in San An- 
tonio. 1030 

Spangler Ludwig. Motor cars supplant horses 
for drayage in Vienna, *637 

Trailer wagons in Vienna snow removal, *591 

Sprague, Frank J. Regenerative braKinc. 4076 

Squier, C. W. Equipment defects, *102, *242, 
*382, *591, *635, *677, *740 

Stahl, Nicholas. Effect of remote feeder taps on 
schedule speed, *991 

Stearns, R. ti. Zone fares in Milwaukee, *836 

Stephens, E. L. Los Angeles illuminated destina- 
tion signs. *1169 

Storer, N. W. EJfctrification on New Haven 
road, c 335 

Stott, H. G. Rational units for the boiler room, 
c468 

StriezhefF, S. Two ways of laying out a com- 
pound curve, *426 

Strong, Elmer E. Telephone dispatching in city 
service, *885 

Sutherland, John. Balanced door-operating mech- 
anism, "1038 

Tri-City trouble board, *1078 

Tri-City railway bearing practice, "944 



Tanis, G. B. Improved portable lamp bank 
holder. 893 

Thomas, Carl C. Possible lines of power plant 
progress, c 939 

Throop, H. G. Electrolysis develops defects in 
concrete poles, 294 

Tingley, C. L. S. National electrical safety 
code, c 845 

Tinnon, John B". Paving experience at Joliet, 
1079 

Tracy, A. H. High-voltage third-rail construc- 
tion, "469 



R 



W 



Ga., 



Ralston, S. M. Interurban fares in Indiana, 456 

Reed, D, A. Workingmen's compensation in 
Pennsylvania, 980 

Remington, G. W. Selection of city motor equip- 
ment, 675 

Rettger, E. W., and S. G. George. Stress analy- 
sis of the Chicago steel car, c *291 

Richey, Albert S., Bay State arbitration, c 758 

Ricker, C. W. New power station for Havana, 
"920 

Roberts, Clarence. Training steam railroad men 
for electrical operation, *970 

Rooke, George F. Automatic registration of 
fares, c 844 

Rosa, E. B. National electrical safety rules, 750 

The safety code, c 939 

— — and Burton McColIum. Corrosion of metals 
in natural soils, c 419 

Ross, A. A. Removing pinions from motor 
axles, c 800 

(Abbreviations: *IIlustrated. c Correspondence.) 



Wade, A. Maintenance, of cars at Rome, 
383 

Waterman, F. N. Corrosion of metals in natural 
soils, c 420 

Waters, W. T. The jitney bus and syndicated 
news, c 586 

Weeks, T. W. Federal reserve system 222 

Welsh, H. S. Interest rates on public utility 
bonds, c 137 

New Jersey decision, c 57 

Welsh, Maurice A. Welfare measures for em- 
ployees^ 841 

Whitney, G. C. Company section movement, 
c 511 

Williams, R. P. Derailments from worn flanges, 
•1037 

Folding box to guard the public when weld- 
ing track, *847 

Mysterious derailments, 1078 

Williams, T. S. The code of principles, 220 

The President's address, c 290 

Wilson, George L. Flange-bearing special work, 
c 1034 

Wilson, T. H. The jitney situation, c 421 

Jitneys vs. light cars, c 1206 

Wilson, P. Ney. Life of way structure, "1212 

Wilson, Woodrow, President. Address at meet- 
ing of American Electric Railway Asso- 
ciation, 217, 275 



Yungbluth, B. J. Baling waste paper, shavings 

and excelsior, c 239 
Sale of scrap metals, c 381 



XVI 



INDEX. 



[Vol. XLV. 



PERSONAL 



Adams, Charles Francis, 653 
Aldred, J, E., 778 
Alexander, Harry W^ 79 
Alexander, Norman S., *962 
Alexander, Walter, 312 
Allen, Edsar, 488 
Allen, J. Drew, 1051 
Allen, Walter Spooner, 737 
Allison, Giles S., 121 
Anthony, Nathan, 160 
Armstrong, Alexander, Jr., 312 
Atherton, F. B., 736 

Baird, J. L., 312 
Balfour, Robert A., 401 
Baltzer, A., 312 
Bamberger, Julian M., 1227 
Bancroft, William H., 913 
Banghart, C. S., 442, *448 
Barnard, F. S., 312 
Beach, II. L., 442, *S34 
Beck, A. E., 400 
Bennett, S. H., 312 
Benz, G., 356 
Berliner, R. W., 1185 
Bibb, W. A., 206 
Blain, H. E., 356 
Blake, W. E,, 356 
Bock, E. J., 120 
Borchers, William, 694 
Brain, O. W., 778 
Brewster, John C., 313 
Bronsdon, M. H., 653 
Brown, C. E., 356 
Brown, John W., 1185 
Brown, Richard S., 1227 
Birdd, D. E., 121 
Bullock, George, 312 
Burt, Byron T., 1185 
Byllesby, H. M., 442 

Callahan, B. L., 206 
Campbell, R. V., 1137 
Cantrell, Deaderick, H., 820, 913 
Capitain, Henry I)., *864 
Cargill, Walter N., 400 
Carmalt, James W., 79 
Carr, James O., 864 
Carraway, Leake, 442 
Carroll. Edward J., 400 
Chadwick, C. T., 1137 
Chapman, C. T., 442, 488 
Chapman, Clarence L., 79 
Chase, Benjamin Ellery, 694 
Chisholm, William W., 313 
Clapp, Harold W., 1009 
Clapper, Will. 442 534 
Clay, Herbert, 261 
Cole, C. C, 606 
Collette, H, S., 912 
Collins, T. v., 652 
Colvin, C. W., 312 
Cook, R. S., 736 
Coons, Charles A., 820 
Cooper, C. P., 312 
Cosgrove, Robert E., 261 
Couch, H. C. 1051 
Cox, George M., 79, 261 
Criliy, John A., 778 
Cronbach, Ernst, 161 
Crook, R. W., 1227 
Crosby, Oscar T., 606 
Curran, D. D., *121, 160 
Curtis, Rodney, 1051 
Curtis, T., 206 
Cutter, George, 778 

Daly, David, 442, "1051 
Davidson, A, T., 488 
Davis, W. L., 206 
I>ay, Joseph P., 1009 
De r.^marter, L. J., 400 
Dewey, Francis H., 1095 
Dihbins, W. J., 1009 
Dill, S. T., 312 
Donlon, Joseph, 121 



Dows, S. C, 736 
Draper, Walter A., 160 
Drayton, Henry Lumley, 1137 
Duffy, C. Nesbitt, 488 
Dunn, Sherman W., 606 

Eagleson, Freeman T., 1095 
Eastman, Joseph B., 120 
Edwards, Allen F., 1095 
Elwell, Charles C, 534 
Englis, John, 736 
Estabrook, G. L., 400 
Evans, Martin, 864 
Erickson, Halford, *912 
Ewing, M. C, *261 

Fairchild, C. B., Jr., 1137 
Feustel, Robert M., 400 
Fisher, F. E., *206 
Flanigan, C. D., 312 
Foote, W. A., 778 
Foraker, J. Benson, 864 
Fuller, Arthur B., 261 
Fuller, Carl H., 1009 
Fuller, F. L., 488 

Gaboury, J. A., 736, 778 
Gahagan, H. I., 120 
Gaither, Walter H., 79, 160 
Garner, John P., 1051 
(iausmann, Samuel, 534 
Geary, W. P., 912 
Gilman, William A., 962 
Glazier, Harry, 261 
Gonzenbach, Ernest, 1051 
Goodrich, Donald, 913 , 
Graham, Edward M., 261 
Green, Thomas, 1095 
Greeley, John E., 160 
Griffith, C. J., 442 
Guckel, Charles H., 820 
Gunnison, Stanley Eaton, 1009 

Hagerman, H. M., 160 
Hale, Joshua, 1185 
Hall, Henry Clay, 79 
Hall, W. R,, 534 
Hamel, William S., 261 
Hamilton, D. G., 401 
Hamilton, George, 1095 
Harmer, T. T., 1009 
Harries, George H., 488 
Harries, Herbert L., 1095 
Harris, Charles, 160 
Harrsen, Harro, 534 
Hartung, H. C, 442 
Hawkins, N. H., 736 
Hayes, W. S., 913 
Hayward, William, 694 
Hazlitt, W. H., 400 
Heft, N. H., 488 
Hemingway, W. L., 820 
Hendrie, John Strathearn, 1137 
Henry, Charles L., *488 
Henrv, G. S., 120, 160 
Henry, S. T., 1227 
Herrin, J. C, 736 
Higgins, Wallace E., 1051 
Hilliard, Thomas, 1051 
Hoag, C. A., 312 
Honnold, O. A.. 534 
Hood, Smith, 606 
Horner, Edward, 120 
Hornung, J. H., 261 

Ireland, L. G., 1137 

Jackson, Carl D., 261, 312 
Tenk.s, C. O., 1095 
Jones, H. T., 160, "207 

Kavanaugh, William M., 443 
Keele, A. R., 312 
Keim, Lewis. 488 
Kelly, John T., 962 



Kingsley, Darwin P., 1051 
Knapp, Z. E., 357 
Kucera, Joseph A., 820 

Ladd, Charles H., 401 
Landis, Lee H., 160 
Langdon, Lawrence K., 1095 
Leach, Thomas A., 963 
Learned, Clarence E., *653 
Lee, J. W., Jr., 120 
Leonard, H. Ward, 401 
Levinson, L. M^ 606 
Libby, Charles F., 1137 
Linen, James A., Jr., 736 
Loop, C., 312 

McCarthy, P. O., 206 
McCloskey, Hugh, 312 
McCuUum, J. Grant, 207 
McCulloch, George F., 694 
McCulloch Richard, •443 
McElroy, James F., 356 
McGrath, W. H., *261 
McMillin, Emerson, 1185 
Mack, John M., 313 
Mackenzie, Alexander, 1009 
Mackintosh, John G., 1137 
MacLean, John E., 160 
Magoon, W. W., 443 
Maltbie, Milo R., 694 
Mandelick, W. E., 120, 357 
Marcum, James O., 694 
Marquardt, J. C, 864 
Martin, Burr, 120 
Martin, Carl N., 962 
Martin, Thomas W., 912 
Martin, W. L.. 606 
Massengale, Lee, 737 
Mather, Thomas H., 160 
Mathews, E. L., 534 
Matthew, H. T., 1227 
Merrill, J. H., 1185 
Mitchell, Guy E., 120 
Mitchell, James, 606 
Moore, E. Blaine, 606 
Moore, John S., 488 
Morreil, C. K., 606 
Morrison, Norman, 206 
Moyer, C. C, 1009 
Mueller, John A,, 778 
Mumford, Charles C, 312 
Murdock, Samuel T., 1009 
Murphy, John D., 737 
Murphy, P. J., 1051 
Myers, W. C, 1009 
Manton, A. M., 488 

Neal, Henry V., *313 
Nelson, J. M., 356 
Newton, H. S., 606 
Nutting, Harry G. D., 160 

O'Connell, William, 736 

Palmer, W. L., 312, 400 
Parker, Tames D., 313 
Parker, William, 534 
Parry, David McLean, 963 
Parshall, Horace Field, 1227 
Pearson, F. S., 963 
Pennypacker, Samuel W., 79 
Pepperman, W. Leon, 652 
Pevear, J. S., 312 
Pneuman, J. M., 160 
Poor, Henry W., 778 
Prather. H. C, 534 
Price, Charles S., 161 
Proctor, C. L.. 652 
Purinton, A. J., 1051 
Purvis, Allen, 400, 736 

Rabe, T. H., 736 
Rathenau, Dr. Emil, 1227 
Rathbun, E. W., 534 
Ray, William D., 606 
Reagan, L. S., 912 
Ream, Norman B., 356 
Reese, Daniel W., 400 



Richardson, John Wesley, 313 
Kichey, Albert S., '652 
Riddle, Samuel, 261 
Rider, John Hall, 261 
Risser, George W., 401 
Robbins, C. H., 778 
Robertson, C. H., 206 
Rogers, A. G., 160 
Rogers, G. Tracy, 534 
Rogers, S. C, 1051 
Ross, J. P., 736 
Rothery, T. C, 606 
Russ, S. H., 160 
Russel, George H., 1009 
Rye, L. F., 1227 

Sanborn, C. H., 1009 
Sanborn, H. H., 736 

Sanderson, E. N., 400 
Sawtelle, Walter L., 963 
Sawyer, P. B., 79 
Sawyer W. H., 1009 
Sears, Russell A., *312 
Shaw, E. P., Jr., 963 
Siddons, Frederick L., 356 
Simons, J. W., 120, 160 
Slocum, John W., 778 
Smith, Frank Sullivan, 1185 
Snyder, H. C, 442 
Somers, Herbert John, 864 
Sonle, G. F., 160 
Southard, F. R., 1227 
Speyer, Edgar, 1009, 1095 
Stacy, John W., 736 
Stanley, Albert M., 652 
Steckel, W. A., 160 
Stichter, R. B., 120, ♦161 
Stickle. Linus H., 820 
Strandborg, W. P., 534 
Sullivan, J. V., 864 

Taaffe, W. H., 534 
Talmadge, O. G., 160 
Tarkington, W. B., 207 
Taylor, Frederick Winslow, 653 
Thomas, J. P., 356 
Thompson, E. B., 206 
Thyse, Emil N., 778 
Townley, Calvert, 864 
Trimble, Robert, 606 
Turner, William F., 778 

Van Viense, A. T.. 820 
Von Schrenk, Arnold, 206 
Veley, Elmer, 864 
Verner, J. P., 864 
Veser, L. O., 1095 
Vreeland, H. H., 912 

Wadsworth, Eliot, 652 
Walcott, W. S., 778 
Walker, Howard, 400 
Wallace, Charles F., 962, 1185 
Waltermire, Beecher W., 312 
Warfield, F. Howard, 312 
Watson, James O., 606 
Webster. Frank W., 261 
Weisenfluh, J. E., 736 
Wells, Joseph S., 442 
West, George S:, 160 
West, W. S., 161 
Westman. A. W., 121 
White, Clinton, 912, 1009 
White, Pope Y., 312 
Whiteiey, Calvin, Jr., 1009 
Whitley, C. W., 442 
Whitridge, Frederick W., 1137 
Wickersham, L. B., 694 
Williams, Robert E., 261 
Winslow, E. F., 864 
Wissel, A., 443 
Wolff, S. E., 400 
Wood, Clark V., •109S 
Woodward, W. O., 534 
Worman, P. H., 261 
Wright, J. A., 120 



■ Denotes Portrait. 



Electric ra 

JOURN 



/olume 45 
Nlumber 6 
eb. 6, 1915 




AY 



McGraw 
Publishing 
Co., Inc. 



"itt-N-"^" 



"^1 



f 



UOJ lO I I 



. mmm. 



out* 



oas 



^ 



"Here is the New Sterling Retriever. It has a 
number of new features and is interchangeable 
with our present equipment. The economical 
service given us by the Sterling single and 
double fare registers is a good recommendation 
for the new product." 

The New Haven Trolley Supply Co. 

New Haven, Conn. 

Also Manufacture and Sell 



Sterling Trolley Catchers 



Sterling Trolley Wheels 



Recording Fare Registers 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



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Westinghouse HR Section Insulators 

Recommended for and 00 Wire 

Note how easily the parts of this section insulator can be replaced. 




Westinghouse KB Section Insulators 

Recommended for 000 and 0000 Wire 

They cannot buckle. All iron parts are sherardized. All wearing parts 
are renewable. They are extra strong and as light as section insulators of 
their strength can be made. 





Direction of Travel ^^^ ■^^^ Direction of Travel 

Bakelized Micarta Runner after withstanding the Bakelized Micarta Runner after withstanding the 

passage of 19,125 trolley wheels. passage of 14,025 trolley wheels. 

The above Bakelized Micarta Runners have been in service as part of 
the KB Type Section Insulator under the most severe atmospheric conditions, 
breaking arcs of from 250 to 300 amperes. We are prepared to furnish 
Bakelized Micarta Runners for all Section Insulators, and Insulated Cross- 
overs, at a slight advance in price over the fibre runners regularly provided 
with these devices. 

Bakelized Micarta will not warp and is impervious to moisture. The 
above illustrations show that it outwears the bronze arcing tips. 



Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Co. 



East Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Atlanta, Oa. Charleston, W. Va. 

Baltimore, Md. Charlotte, N. C. 

Birmingham, Ala. Chicago, 111. 

■Blnefleld, W. V«. Cincinnati, Ohio 

Boston. Mass. Cleveland, Ohio 

Buffalo, N. T. Columbus, Ohio 

Batte, Mont •Dallas, Tex. 



Dayton, Ohio 
Denver, Colo. 
Detroit. Mich. 
•El Paso, Tei. 
•Houston. Tex. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Joplln, Mo. 




Kan.sas City, Mo. 
Loulsyille, Ky. 
Los Aueeles, Cat. 
Memphis, Tenn. 
Milwaukee. Wis. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 



New Orleans, L.a. 
New York, N. T. 
Omaha, Neb. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Portland, Ore. 
Rochester, N. T. 



St. Louis, Mo. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Seattle, Wash. 
Syracuse. N. Y. 
Toledo. Ohio 
Washington, D. C. 
W. E. & M. Co. of Texas. 



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Electric Railway Journal 



New York, February 6, 1915 



Volume XLV No. 6 



Contents 



Pages 265 to 316 



New Cars for New Orleans 270 

These cars combine all of the most modern develop- 
ments in design, having fully-inclosed platforms, arched 
roofs with ventilators, all-steel construction except for 
wooden sheathing on roof and floor, and a novel form 
of pressed-steel carline which fits into the hollow side 
post. 
Electric Railway Journal, Feb. 6, 1915. SV4 col-s. 111. 

The President, the Newspapers and the Associ- 
ation 275 

Mr. Wilson's address before the mid-year meeting 
treated by the press as an important political message. 
Verbatim report of address with comments from lead- 
ing newspapers in different parts of the country. 
Electric Railway Journal, Feb. 6, 1915. 10 cols. 

The Brady Medal Award 231 

Below is given an abstract of parts of the report of the 
committee on award outlining safety methods of the 
companies honored — Awards will be officially made in 
New York on Feb. 10. 

Electric Railway Journal, Feb. 6, 1915. 3% cols. 

Three-Phase Italian Passenger Locomotives 283 

These additional locomotives, weighing 73 metric tons 
and carrying two 1300-hp motors each, are for pas- 
senger service on the Giovi subsidiary and Monza-Lecco 
lines. 

Electric Railway Journal, Feb. 6, 1915. 414 cols. 111. 

Saving Energy in Car Propulsion 286 

W. N. Storer analyzed the possibilities of energy saving 
by improved methods of car design and operation at a 
joint engineering meeting in Chicago on Jan. 25. 
Electric Railway Journal, Feb. 6, 1915. 7% cols. III. 

Communications 290 

The President's Address. Terminology for Steel Con- 
struction. Stress Analysis of the Chicago Steel Car. 
The "WE" Slogan Sign. 



Electric Railway Journal, Feb. 6, 1915. 



5% cols. 111. 



American Association News 293 

Committee activities continue as middle of association 
year approaches. Claims Association selects subjects 
for convention program. Block signal committee espe- 
cially busy. 
Electric Railway Journal, Feb. 6, 1915. 2 cols. 

Equipment and Its Maintenance 294 

Electrolysis Develops Defects in But Three Out of 1500 
Concrete Poles— Bj/ H. G. Throop. Case-Hardened Col- 
lar and Welding Reclaim Worn Button-End Axles — By 
A. R. Johnson. Trolley Wire Pick-up — By Harry Bran- 
son. Long Life of Ties in Street Railway Service — By 
R. C. Cram. Handy Forming Blocks for GE-57 Motor 
Bolts of Special Steel — By J. N. Graham. Preventing 
Condensation in Under-Water Conduit — By J. G. Kop- 
pel. Accident Reduction on the Third Avenue Railway. 
Experience with Malleable Iron Cross-Arms on Wooden 
Poles. Latest Double-Deck Car of the Glasgow Cor- 
poration Tramways. Curtain Fixtures Without Pinch 
Handles. Two- Way Dump Cars. 
Electric Railway Journal, Feb. 6, 1915. 14 cols. III. 



Editorials 265 
Northern White Cedar Association 274 
German 1500-Volt D.C. Line with Regeneration and 
Battery 274 
Address of C. Loomis Allen at Mid-Year Meeting 280 
Quarterly Pamphlet by New York Up-State Commis- 
sion 282 
Change in Car-Wiring Code Recommended 285 
L C. C. Report on Steam Railroads in 1913 2S9 
Commission Report on Electric Interurban Lines of 
Iowa 292 
London Letter 301 
News of Electric Railways 302 
Financial and Corporate 306 
Traffic and Transportation 309 
Personal Mention 312 
Construction News 313 
Manufactures and Supplies 316 



James H. McGkaw, President. a. E. Clifford, Secretary. J- T. De Mott, Treasurer. H. W. Blake, Editor. 

McGraw Publishing Company, Inc. 



Chioaoo, 1570 Old Colony Bid?. 

Cleveland, Leader-News Bldg. 
Philadelphia, Real Estate Trust Bldg. 



239 West 39th St., New York City 



San Francisco, 502 Rialto Bldg. 

De.nver, Boston Bldg. 
London, 10 Norfolk St., Strand. 



United States, Mexico, Cuba, Porto Rico, Hawaii, or the Philippines, $3 per year; Canada, $4.50; elsewhere, $6. Single copy, 10c. 

Copyright, 1914, by McGraw Publishinq Company, Inc. Published Weekly. Entered at N. Y. Post Office as Second-Class Mall. 

No back volumes for more than one year, and no back copies for more than three months. 

Circulation of this issue 8100 copies. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL [February 6, 1915 



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SPEED 



(Speed is good, Safety is better, Speed-Safety is best) 



FIRMLY LINKED WITH THE THOUGHT OF TRAVEL 
IN THE MIND OF THE AVERAGE AMERICAN IS THE 
IDEA OF SPEED . THE RESTLESS ENERGY OF A NATION 
EXPRESSES ITSELF IN A DESIRE TO MOVE QUICKLY. 
WE TAKE THE "EXPRESS" IN PREFERENCE TO THE 
"LOCAL" EVERY TIME. 

ELECTRIC OPERATION TENDS TOWARDS HIGH 
SPEEDS. SUBWAY AND ELECTRIC TRAIN MOVEMENT 
COMPARE WITH THE BEST STEAM ROAD SCHEDULES, 
WHILE "A MILE A MINUTE" IS COMMON ON INTER- 
URBAN LINES. 

SPEED IS GOOD IF SAFE. AIR BRAKES CONTROL 
SPEED. THE BEST BRAKES CONTROL SPEED BEST. 



Suggested by the 

Westing house Traction Brake Company 

Works: Wilmerding, Pennsylvania 

PITTSBURGH: Westinghouse Building NEW YORK; City Investing Building 

CHICAGO: Railway Exchange Building ST. LOUIS: Security Building 



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February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



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T 



Griswold Street— Detroit's Wall Street 

Detroit 

The Automobile City 

HE rapid growth of the city makes the transporta- 
tion problem a very difficult one. It is being ably 
and successfully met by the Detroit United Railway 



service. 



The progressive policy of the management is show^n 
in the use of Westinghouse HL Control on its interurban 
trains, and in the recent purchase of a Baldwin-Westing- 
house Electric Locomotive for interurban freight haulage. 
Three-fourths of the motors on Detroit United System 
are Westinghouse. 

Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Co. 



Sales Offices in all 
large American Cities 




East Pittsburgh 
Pennsylvania 



DDDDDDDDDDDDDDnDDDDDDDDDDDDnDDPanLlUDDDDLiaaDDaaDaDD 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



PUBLISHER'S PAGE 



$2 to $5 

for 
Photographs 



What 

have 

You? 



Electric Railway Journal wants photo- 
graphs for the use of its advertisers. 
For any photographs showing advertised 
products in use that are found available 
for reproduction in the advertising pages, 
Electric Railway Journal will pay from 
two to five dollars each, according to the 
size and excellence of the print. 

Photographs should clearly show the 
product to be advertised — and show it 
either in service or in the process of 
being installed. 

The presence of workmen in the pic- 
tures, although not necessary, is desirable 
— they lend human interest to the view, 
providing they are busy about their work 
and not merely posing for a portrait. 

The data which accompanies photo- 
graphs should tell the trade name of the 
product shown or the name of the manu- 
facturer, and give essential facts regard- 
ing the installation. 

Information as to difficulties overcome, 
savings effected or objects accomplished 
is particularly desired. 

What can you send us? 

Mark photos plainly with your name 
and address ; mail them so that they will 
not be broken or creased; and address 
them to 

Manager of Service Department, 

Electric Railway Journal, 

239 West 39th St., New York. 

Photographs found not available for use 
will be returned promptly. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



lillllllllllliliiilillllllllllillliliiliillllllllllllilililililllilllililllllllllliilliiiiiillllilllllilllllllll^^ 



iiiiiiiiiiiniiin 




The Interpretation of Electrolysis 

is a problem which can be solved only by a scientific organization 
of specialists in electric power distribution, in railway operating 
conditions, such as ratio of peak to normal load currents, and in 
the electro-chemistry of soils, metals and electrical conductors. 
The time has gone by when 

Electric Railways Could Ignore Electrolysis 

complaints. They have learned that although better bonds and electric welding 
have brought them nearer and nearer to the ideal of a closed circuit, electrolysis 
may occur in spite of these improvements. You, as an electric railway manager, 
should understand your electrolytic conditions so well that when the local gas 
or water works claim damage for rusted pipes you will have at hand the proof 
of your innocence. It is the part of wisdom, therefore, to 

Anticipate Electrolysis Suits 

by having our staff make a thorough study of your system in all its aspects. Do 
not depend on simple, home-made experiments. For example, nothing is more 
deceptive than the time-honored voltage test between two buried conductors, for 
in spite of the general belief 

High Voltage and Large Currents 

are not necessarily team-mates by any means ; nor can you rely upon studies with 
grounding plates, for these often may generate currents of their own. These 
two instances suffice to show the need for an independent investigation that will 
uncover the faults of other power users and show you how to remedy your own. 



ARTHUR D. LITTLE, Inc. 

Chemists and Engineers 
93 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 





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8 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 




^Location of Trains 
Automatically Displayed 
Direct to Dispatcher 




^Continuous Display of 
Signals in Motorman's Cab 



-^■Direct Communication 

from Dispatcher to Motorman 




.Signal Indications 
Automatically Interlocked 
Against Error 



THE SIMMEN SYSTEM 

P. J. Simmen, Buffalo 

THE NORTHEY-SIMMEN SIGNAL CO., Ltd. SIMMEN AUTOMATIC RAILWAY SIGNAL CO. 



TORONTO 



BUFFALO 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 






Track and Weather Conditions 
will soon be Treacherous 



making it harder for the motormen to stop the car in emergencies, 
— making it more inviting for the conductor to take a chance in 
not throwing the hand signals, 

— making it more uncomfortable for passengers to suffer the delays 
occasioned by no signaling or signaling dependent upon the "human 
element," 

— putting the operation of some automatic signals against that- 
crucial test — severe weather. 

An installation NOW of United States Automatic Electric Signals 
will eliminate the cause of making emergency stops to prevent 
collision, 

— will eliminate the need of taking chances, 
— will eliminate the traffic delays occasioned by manual! signals, 
— will remove all question of proper operation of signals in bad 
weather, 

— and, what is equally desirable, will save your road good money. 
We will co-operate with you in paving the way for a perfect traffic 
system. 
Write for our proposition. 



Uxiited Statowr 
E'leotrio Signal Co. 



West Newton. 



10 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 




Reduce Your Maintenance Forces 
Put a BROWNHOIST at Work 



Did you ever calculate how much saving a 
Brownhoist Work-Car Crane would make on 
your roadway and construction costs? Ask 
the companies .who are using the Brownhoist 
Crane. 

The upper picture shows the Pittsburg 
Railway Co. Crane fitted with a hook block 
for handling dump buckets, rails, ties, cross- 
overs, poles, timbers and other construction 
material. 



The Cleveland Railway Co. has two of these 
Brownhoist Cranes. The one below, which is 
shown with the grab bucket, has proven eco- 
nomical in handling sand, gravel, crushed 
stone, cinders, coal, etc. 

And the Brownhoist WORK-CAR CRANE 
handles its own work trains, being self-pro- 
pelling. 

Send for catalogue " I," which shows how 
and where some of these cranes are used. 



The Brown Hoisting Machinery Company 

Cleveland, Ohio 




961i: 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



11 



^■^ 







TOUGHNESS 

in Phono-Electric Wire 



'^S!*'v 












■'' I ""OUGHNESS in trolley wire is a quality not defined by 
either tensile strength or elasticity, but — a power to 
resist bending, kinking, wrenching, sudden blows or slow distor- 
tions, without giving way. 

"Phono^Electric" is a tough wire, and it is a wire that'll give long 
Service Life. 

It is a wire you can absolutely depend upon — does not rely upon a hard- ^ 

ened skin for its strength. It is uniform throughout its cross-section. 

No matter what your requirements may be — Catenary, Cross-Span or Bracket 
Construction — no matter how severe the service — "Phono=Electric" a strong, 
tough wire, will save money on that service giving several times the life of hard 
drawn copper. Put up a test section — make comparisons. 

BRIDGEPORT BRASS COMPANY 

BRIDGEPORT CONNECTICUT 




5 



North American Copper Company 
164 Front St., New York, U. S. A. 

Pierson, R o e d i n g & Company 

San Francisco Portland Seattle Los Angeles 

The Equipment & Engineering Company 

2 and 3 Norfolk St., Strand, W. C, London, England 





12 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



Tit lall Jfetaf femi 





Makers of Base-Supported and One Hundred Per Cent. Rail Joints for Standard Girder, 
and Special Rail Sections. Also Joints for Frogs and Switches; Insulated Rail Joints 
and Step or Compromise Rail Joints. Patented in United States and Canada. 




ROLLED 

FROM 

BEST QUALITY 

STEEL 



AGENCIES 

Boston, Mass. India BIdg. 

Chicago, III. Ry. Exchange BIdg. 

Denver, Colo. Equitable BIdg. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pennsylvania BIdg. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. Oliver BIdg. 

Portland, Ore. Wilcox BIdg. 
St. Louis, Mo., 

Commonwealth Trust BIdg. 
Troy, N. Y. Burden Avenue 



Montreal, Canada. 

Board of Trade BIdg. 



London, 



England. 
36 New Broad St. 



WEBER GIRDER RAIL JOINT 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



13 




ARMCO ^ir.SS!5 CULVERTS 



under highways and railroads 
in every State of the Union and 
in a dozen foreign countries 
have absolutely demonstrated 
their Efficiency, Reliability 
and Lasting Quality. 

Their material is the de- 
velopment of many years of 
investigation and experience 



in the production of Rust-Re- 
sisting Iron, embodying the 
results of the deepest delvings 
of science and of the practical 
observations of the furnace 
men, the metal workers and 
the engineers in the field. It is 
the purest, most even and most 
durable iron ever placed on the 
market. 



Write the Nearest Manufacturer for particulars and prices on 

Armco Corrugated Culverts, Siphons, Plates, Sheets, 

Roofing and Formed Products 



Arkansas, Little Rock 

Dlile Culvert & Metal Co. 

I California, IjOB AniireleB 

California Corrugated Culvert Co. 

I California, West Berkeley- 
California Corrugated Culvert Co. 

I Colornilo, Denver 
K. Hardesty Mfg. Co. 

I Delairnre, Clayton 

Delaware Metal Culvert Co. 

I Florida, Jacksonville 

Dixie Culvert & Metal Co. 

I Georgia, Atlanta 

Dixie Culvert & Metal Co. 

Illinois, Bloomln^ton 

Illinois Corrugated Metal Co. 

Indiana, CraTvfordsyille 

W. Q. O'Neall Co. 

I loTva, Des Moines 

Iowa Pure Iron Culvert Co. 

I Iowa, Independence 

Independence Calvert Co. 

71557 



Kansas, Topeka 

The Road Supply & Metal Co. 

Kentucky, Louisville 

Kentucky Culvert Co. 

Lonlslana, Ne^v Orleans 

Dixie Culvert & Metal Co. 
Maryland, Havre de Grace 

Spencer, J. N. 

Massaclinsetts, Palmer 

New England Metal Culvert Co. 
Mlclilfrnn. Bark River 

Bark River Bridge & Culvert Co. 
Mlcliiiirnn. linnsinK 

MIclilgan Bridge & Pipe Co. 
Minnesota. Minneapolis 

Lyle Corrugated Culvert Co. 
Minnesota, Lyle 

Lyle Corrugated Culvert Oo. 
Missouri, Moberly 

Corrugated Culvert Co. 
Montana. Missoula 

Montana Culvert Co. 
Neltraska. Lincoln 

Lee-Amett Co. 



Nebraska, "Wahoo 

Nebraska Culvert & Mfg. Co. 

Nevada, Reno 

Nevada Metal Mfg. Co. 

New Hampshire, Nasiina 

North-East Metal Culvert Co. 

Nenr Jersey, FlemiuKton 

Pennsylvania Metal Culvert Co. 

Nc^v York, Auburn 

Pennsylvania Metal Culvert Co. 

North Carolina, Greensboro Texas, Houston 

Dixie Culvert & Metal Co. Lone Star Culvert Oo. 



Pennsylvania. -Warren 

Pennsylvania Metal Onlrert Oo. 

Sonth Dakota, Sioux Falls 

Sioux Falls Metal Culvert Oo. 

Tennessee, Nashville 

Tennessee Metal Cnlvert Oo. 

Texas. Dallas 

Atlas Metal Works 

Texas, El Paso 

Western Metal Mfg. Oo. 



North Dakota, Wahpeton 

Northwestern Sheet & Iron Works 

Ohio. Mlddletown 

American Rolling Mill Co. 

The Ohio Corrugated Culvert Co. 

Oklalioma. Shawnee 

Dixie Culvert & Metal Co. 

Orenron. Portland 

Coast Culvert & Flume Co. 



Utah. -Woods Cross 

Utah Corrugated Calvert AFInme Oo.| 

-VirKinia. Roanoke 

Virginia Metal Culvert Oo. 

Washlnsrton, Spokane 

Spokane Cor. Culvert & Tank Co. 

W^lsconsln, G!an Claire 

Bark River Bridge * Culvert Co. 



14 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



The Track Gang Used to Heat 
their coffee on the Rail Joints 




The incident 
^ here pictured 

actually occurred 



This is an Impossibility 



where Electric Welded Rail Bonds" are used 

This road was running only a few cars and they had hard work to 
keep those cars in action. 

They were wasting current — wasting time — wasting money. 

You too are losing out if your rail joints cause current to leak 
away from the return circuit. Stop the losses and double-cross 
claims for electrolysis by putting on Electric Welded Rail Bonds. 

The economic reasons why you should are interesting. Let us 
send you them. 

The Electric Railway Improvement Co. 

«i8 CLEVELAND, OHIO 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



15 




Applying Asbestos and Molasses Strips to Rails Pre- 
vious to Adjusting Mold 



You Will Eliminate All 
Joints from the Track by 
These Simple Operations 

You Can Do the Work Yourselves. 
We Furnish All Materials and 
Give Necessary Instructions. 




Adjusting Two Part Mold to Rails 




Final Luting Process 
Blowing Powdered Fire-clay into Mold 




Preheating Rail Ends, Heating Thermit Additions and 
Baking Mold in One Operation 




During the past year we have devoted a great deal of 
attention to simplifying the methods used in welding 
rails by the Thermit insert process, so as to make it 
possible for street railway companies to do the welding 
themselves, thus putting everything in their own hands 
and enabling them to do the work wherever they please, 
whether they have one joint or several thousand to weld. 
This we have succeeded in doing by the perfection of 
special apparatus for ramming the molds, luting them 
where they come in contact with the rails and in other 
ways so simplifying the process that anyone can make 
the welds if our instructions are carefully followed. 

The first cost of necessary materials and apparatus is 
very low, considering the fact that with them you obtain 
a fully welded rail joint giving too per cent, electric 
conductivity, and breakages so negligible that they can- 
not be figured in percentages at all. 

This fully welded joint should not be confused with 
other so-called welded rail joints on the market, as they 
are only partially welded and none of them obliterate 
the joint itself. The Thermit insert joint, however, com- 
prises the welding of the entire rail section so that rails 
welded by this method are made continuous, with all 
joints eliminated. 

The improvements referred to above have resulted in 
not only simplifying the process but in reducing the cost 
of the joint to a considerable extent, and if you would 
like to obtain further particulars, write for our Pam- 
phlet No. 3932, which tells the whole story. 

• Before considering any new construction work for 
the year 191 5, get the information given in our pamphlet. 




Finished Thermit Fully Welded Insert Rail Joint 



Goldschmidt Thermit Co. 

WILLIAM C. CUNTZ, General Manager 

90 WEST STREET, NEW YORK 

329-333 Folaom St., San Francisco 103 Richmond St., W., Toronto, Ont. 
7300 So. Chicago Ave., Chicago 



16 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



Our TracJ^ 
Special Work 
is Always 



Bolted down inserts on partially 
or completely machined bearings 
are believed to be necessary to 
meet many present-day, heavy 
traffic conditions. 



Machine -Finished 

It explains the Rigid Construction 
and Long Life of 



Elech'ic RatltrayJoui 

<^ Sepiembei' 13 tA. 



nalA 



Manganese Insert Frog 
with Cast Steel Body 




Jfalfe special l^orfe 



Our Manganese-Center type of Special Work is a construction that has 
made possible such a conclusion as "Insert Special Work equals the serv- 
iceability of Solid-Manganese Steel Special Work," which appeared in an 
article in the September 19th issue of the Electric Railway Journal. 

It will pay you to specify FALK Manganese-Center Frogs and either 
the Manganese-Center type of switches and mates or the Solid-Manganese 
construction, because our Manganese inserts are always machine fitted, in- 
suring an absolute bearing, and our Solid-Manganese pieces are machine- 
finished throughout. 

®t)e Jfalb Company 

iHiltpaukee 



NEW YORK CITY— Wendell & MacDuffic Co. 



LOS ANGELES— Alphonso A. Wigmore 



SEATTLE— Parrott & Co. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



17 



SKEE-BALL 

A Profitable and Fascinating Trolley Park Attraction 




"Seven Thousand Six Hundred and Twenty-three Games Were Played on these Four Alleys in 
Thirty-two and One-Half hours at the American Electric Railway Association Convention last 

October." 

This game will draw the people to your park and make 
big money for your concessionaire. 

Order now for early deliveries 

We have some mighty convincing figures on receipts 
from this game. Better ask us for them. 

The J. D. Este Co , 1534 Sansom St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



18 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



55,000,000 

Dollars 



for maintenance is spent annually in normal times by electric railways. 

What will it be this year? 

Whatever it is, it will still be considerable and worth going after hard — if yot! 
want your fair share. 

Always, the maintenance work goes on in Spring. 

The problem before the electric railway man at this time is 

"IVhat shajl we buy? 

That he must buy, he knows. 

What he is now seeking is information about anything that will help him toward 
efficiency and economy in his maintenance purchases. 

Where does he seek this information? If you know that, you know how to get 
your product prominently before him at this buying period. 

For years electric railway men have eagerly sought and welcomed the 



Electric Rail^vay Journal's 
Annual 

Maintenance Number 



It is their buying guide. Its advertising pages show what's on the market. That 
is why this issue has always been welcomed by manufacturers of electric railway 
materials as an opportunity to present and drive home their selling arguments. This 
year's opportunity, the 1915 Annual Maintenance Number, will be issued 



March 20 



The text pages will be devoted primarily to this live subject of maintenance work. 
Shop methods, descriptive articles featuring phases of maintenance work, helpful 
editorial articles — all tending further to intensify the interest in maintaining equipment 
in prime condition — all tending toward more active buying for buildings, power houses 
and su])Stations, rolling stock, overhead and track. 

Make your advertising story a part of this big, helpful, interesting and timely issue. 

Take a full page or a double page spread and get into that space the kind of 
attention-arresting, interest-arousing, desire-creating copy that will be reflected in 
your sales totals within the next few months — that will swing toward you a fair 
.share of the fifty-five millions of dollars which will surely flow into the coffers of 
those manufacturers who most actively and effectively strive for the business. 

Send data or catalogs now. and let us prepare a suggested advertisement for you, 
to appear in this important issue. 



Electric Railway Journal, 239 W. 39th St., New York 



Member Audit Bureau of Circulations 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



19 



New Standard in Practical 

Engineering Literature 
New Record in Book Sales 



Our method of sending the Power Plant Library for free inspection to 
any one interested in power plant work has enabled us to regitt.r a new 
record in engineering Dook sales. 

The first issue ot this library was placed on sale in November, 1913, 
and within three weeks every set was sold. A second issue containing 
treble the number of books was immediately printed. This second 
issue lasted only sixty days. 
THE THIRD ISSUE IS NOW NEARLY EXHAUSTED. 

Every set of the Power Plant Library sent out to date went 
with the stipulation that it was to be returned at our expense 
it not satisfactory. The percentage of returns is so small 
that it can hardly be computed. 

What does this new record in engineering book sales 
indicate? In the first place it bears us out in our belief 
that the power plant field had not heretofore been cov- 
ered in book form, at least completely and practically. 
It proves that the practical steam and electrical engi- 
neer wants facts without theory, facts in compact 
form, facts about actual practice of today, not of 
tomorrow or yesterday. 

There is so much valuable material in the Power 
Plant Library, that not alone does the practical 
man in the power plant field find it an essential, 
but it is being used for daily reference by 
thousands of technically trained men. 

There is not a reader of the Electric Rail- 
way Journal who does not need the Power 
Plant Library for either study or refer- 
ence. To any one who will return the 
coupon below, we will send the books 
for free inspection. No references 
are required and you are put to no 
expense, as we pay charges both 
ways. By returning the coupon, you 
do not obligate yourself in any way. 
You merely pay $1 per month for twelve 
months or return the books in ten days. 

TITLES: 

Practical Mathematics, 650 pages 
Power Catechism, 226 pages 
Valve Setting, 209 pages 
Boilers, Piping, Pumps, 435 pages 
Shafting, Belting, Governors, 286 pages 
Electrical Catechism, 422 pages 
Steam Turbines, 186 pages 
Mechanical Refrigeration, 172 pages 

W%M-Mde0k(k9»c. 

239 West 39th Street, New York 

PublUhcrt of Books for EUctric Kailtvay Journal 




COUPON 



McGraw-Hill 
Book Co., Inc., 
239 W. 39th St., 
New York 

Gentlemen — Ship 

to me, charges paid, 

your new Power 

Plant Library, eight 

volumes, price $12.00. 

satisfactory after ex- 

- amlnation, I will send $1 

In ten days and $1 per 

month until paid. If not 

wanted, I will write for 

shipping instructions. 



Signature 



Res. Address 
City aa?a State. 






Where employed 



Occupation. 



20 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



RECLAIMING OLD COILS BY 

Vacuum Drying and Impregnating Process 



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A Corner in Our Shop Showing 
Apparatus 

We have been making new coils out of old, with the attending 

saving in expense, for so long a time that we have come to 

be regarded as a very reliable source of supply for this money 

saving service. 

Our field coil and impregnating plant is probably the largest 

and most complete commercial plant in the country. 

Our process of vacuum drying and impregnating means the 

positive elimination of all moisture from the coil first, and 

then the forcing of the best known insulating compound into 

every crevice of the coil, making the coil itself a solid mass 

and eliminating all possibility of short circuit. 



Our Working Force 

We employ only thoroughly experienced men, whose every 
performance is under the careful personal supervision of an 
expert on work of this kind. There is only one possible 
excuse for our impregnating service, and it is to make your 
old coils over as good as new, and at a saving in cost which 
will be "worth while." 
That is precisely what we do. 



The Coils We Get From You 

Many of the coils that come to us are just bunches of wire, 
just junk ; yet we strip these coils, clean and straighten them 
and re-insulate them, and return them to you practically new 
coils and fully guaranteed. 

There is no experimenting about this service. We are saving 
money for a great many representative electric traction com- 
panies throughout the country. 



The Coils We Return To You 

Will prompt you to send us all of your coils that go bad, 

instead of consigning them to the scrap heap. 

We will gladly send you data which will indicate the money 

saving values of our service, and we will gladly send you 

the names of many electric roads who use our impregnating 

service regularly. 

I'his is one way and a sure way to reduce operating expenses, 

and now is a good time to do it. 



Electric Operations Co, 

Bush Terminal, Brooklyn, N. Y. 



7129-P 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



21 




Oxy-Acetylene Welding 
Equipment Paid for Itself 
in one week 



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Write our Service Department for full infor- 
mation on Oxy-Acetylene Apparatus to meet 
Yovr Requirements. 

Ask for "Autogenous Welding," January 
issue. 



Davis-Bournonville Company 

New York Chicago 

General Office* and Demonstration Plant, Marion Station, Jersey City, N. J. 
Chicago Offices, Monadnock Block, Jackson and Dearborn Streets, Chicago 



22 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 




Winter Winds and Driving Sleet 
Will Soon be Sweeping Against 
Your Overhead System 

Streaming arcs of fire will soon mark the course of your trolley wheels 
as they follow the ice-bound wire. It takes tough trolley wire to with- 
stand the winter service, and it takes tough feeder wires and cables, too, 
to bear the strain of the tons of ice. Our 



ROUND, GROOVED AND FIGURE 8 



TROLLEY WIRE 



and 



Star Brand Weatherproof Wire and Cables 

on hundreds of miles of electric railway lines is of wind and storm. In 'every clime our trolley 

proving its efficiency and economy by its endur- wire and Star Brand weatherproof wire and 

ing strength and successful resistance to the fury cables is cutting overhead maintenance costs. 

Write for list and data. 

American Electrical Works 



NEW YORK: 165 Broadway 
CHICAGO: 112 West Adams Street 
BOSTON: 176 Federal Street 
71659 



Phillipsdale, R. I. 



CINCINNATI: Traction BuUdlnft 
SAN FRANCISCO: 612 Howard Street 
SEATTLE: 1002 First Ave. So. 



„^9.^/^NEi^C^ 




The STANDARD for RUBBER INSULATION 

Railway Feed Wires insulated with OKONITE are 
unequalled for flexibility, durability, and efficiency, and 
are in use by the leading Electric Street Railway 
Companies. OKONITE is preferred above any other insu- 
lation for Car Wiring, Telegraph and Telephone Purposes. 

OKONITE WIRES — OKONITE TAPE— 
MANSON TAPE— CANDEE WEATHER- 
PROOF WIRES— CANDEE PATENTED 
POTHEADS. 

Samples and Estimates on Application 



THE OKONITE COMPANY, 



253 Broadway, New York 



CENTRAL ELECTRIC CO., Chicago, 111., General Western Agents 
F. D. Lawrence Electric Co., Cincinnati, O. Novelty Electric Co., Philadelphia, Ta. Pettingell-Andrewi Co., Boston, Mass. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



23 




T1MEISSAYEI) 



on your running schedules by eliminating the 
conductor-operated signal. This stopping a 
car in order for a man to run out and throw 
a signal switch is a nuisance to passengers. 
And there's the risk of your man forgetting 
to do it. 

Chapman Automatic 
Signals 

eliminate the risk, save the time and shorten 
schedules, besides securing better service to 
your passengers. And the cost is very mod- 
erate. If you are operating at thirty miles an 
hour or less, Chapman Signals will .give your 
road perfect protection at a big saving over 
more complicated and costly signal systems. 
Let us tell you what we have done for other 
roads. 



L 



Charles N. Wood Co., 



79 Milk St., Boston, Mass. 




7136 




Fibre 
Conduit 



A thoroughly 
tested material. 

Has been in use 
for over 20 years 
and found to be 
the best insulator 
for underground 
cables. 



Book "R" will tell 
you of tests and 
other features. 



4-inch HARRINGTON JOINT "ON THE JOB" 



The Fibre Conduit Company 



New York 



Orangeburg, N. Y. 

Boston Chicago 



San Francisco 



24 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February (5, 1915 



Maximum Certainty and Safe- 
ty with Minimum Installation 
and Maintenance Cost 

The 

Hoeschen 

Highway 
Crossing 
Signals 




DANrGER 




Does not in- 
terfere with 
track circuits 
and is not 
opiated by 
trolley cur- 
rent. Free 
from elec- 
* trical trou- 
bles. 
The bell is started, 
stopped and wound by 
the movement of the car 
wheels over the track. 
The bell is connected by 
a metallic circuit with 
magneto generator which 
is operated by means of 
an arm clamped rigidly 
to the base of the rail. 
A slight lateral move- 
ment of the rail head, 
caused by the pressure of 
the wheels of train pass- 
ing over it, is multiplied 
many times at the outer 
or free end of the arm. 
This operates the gen- 
erator. 

Oscillating blades which 
keep swinging until the 
train has passed ; a night 
illuminated warning ; a 
loud - voiced locomotive 
bell, with a peremptory 
note that can be heard 
above the noise of auto- 
mobile traffic ; a mechan- 
ism that needs no bond 
wires, track circuits or 
delicate apparatus — are 
the strong features that 
have made the HOE- 
SCHEN HIGHWAY 
CROSSING SIGNAL 
the backbone of the 
"Safety First" movement. 
Installed on more than 
loo steam and electric 
railroads in America and 
abroad. 

Write for Descriptive Matter 
and Photographs 

Hoeschen 

Mfg. 
Company 

OMAHA, 
NEB. 




Gate at Danger 
D. L. & N.-W. Ry. 



On Comes the Traveller 1 
On Comes the Train! 

An Accident! 

— loss of life — claims — litigation — trouble — 
expense — publicity — damaging criticism ? 

NO — there's a 

COOK AUTOMATIC 

SIGNAL GATE 

Guarding the Crossing 

Let the train come — down goes that moving 
arm — down goes the barrier — loud rings the 
warning bell. And in the night, when the bell 
might annoy, the brilliant red light gleams its 
danger signal — the illuminated semaphore and 
barrier shine out in relief against the dark. 
Safety is assured — if your crossings are 
guarded by the Cook Signal Gate. Get com- 
plete details. 

The Cook Railway Signal Co. 

1793 South Broadway, Denver, Colo. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



25 




^^^^^ 




"All along our lines 



>> 



said the chief dispatcher, "you will 
find our road-men — conductors, in- 
spectors and construction foremen 
— carrying 

Western Electric 

Portable Telephones 

as a part of their regular equipment. 

The portables have prevented a 
great many expensive delays and 
some possible accidents simply by 
giving our men a means of getting 
in touch with the division dis- 
patcher from any point on the road. 
They're worth their weight in 
gold." 

Write for prices of our various types 
of portables. 

Western Etectrk Company 

Manufacturers of the 6,000,000 "Bell" Telephones 

Ntfw York Atlanta Chicago Kansas City San Francisco 

Buffalo Richmond Milwaukee Omaha Oakland 

Philadelphia Savannah Indianapolis Oklahoma City Los Anfielet 

Boston New Orleans Cleveland Minneapolis Seattle 

Pitlsbiirtih Houston Cincinnati St. Paul Portland 

St. Louis Dallas Denver Salt Lake City 

EQUIPMENT FOR EVERY ELECTRICAL NEED 

Member Sociely (or Electric;il Development. "00 il tleclrically" 




■f^^^B^^^ 



Style "M" Straight Socket Joint 

You Want Conduit 
That Combines Great 
Durability, Efficiency, 
Economy 

Here it is 

t^^ FIBRE 
CONDUIT 

And Here's Wliy 

Great Durability, because of its solid, homogeneous 
construction from" specially-treated fiber, formed under 
pressure and made water, oil, acid, gas and chemical 
proof. Will not break, corrode or decay. 

Great Efficiency, because of its dielectric and mechan- 
ical strength, complete insulating value, perfect water 
and gas-tight joints, smooth bore, and fire-resisting 
quality. 

Great Economy, because it gives better and longer 
service than other conduits ; because it weighs one- 
sixth as much as tile or stonewear conduit — hence re- 
duces trucking and freight charges 80 per cent., and 
cuts down labor cost ; because it can be laid by un- 
skilled workmen ; because it comes in longer sections 
than tile or stoneware conduit, yet costs no more ; 
because it can be laid in a shallower trench than other 
conduit, cutting down labor cost still further. 
Write our nearest Branch for "J-M Fibre Conduit 
Booklet." 

H. W. JOHNS-MANVILLE CO. 

Manufacturers of Service, Subway and Transformer 
Boxes; Fuses; Line Material; Insulating Materials; Fire- 
proof Wood; Friction Tapes; Dry Batteries; Lighting Sys- 
tems, etc. 



Atlanta 

Baltimore 

Boston 

Buffalo 

Chicago 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 



Columbus 
Denver 

Detroit 
Galveston 
Indianapolis 
Kansas City 
Los Angeles 




Milwaukee 

Minneapolis 

Newarlc 

New Orleans 

New York 

Omaha 

Philadelphia 



Pittsburgh 

Portland 
St. Louis 
Salt Lake City 
San Franeisco 
Seattle 
Toledo 



LIMITED. 
Vancouver 



THE CANADIAN H. W. JOHNS-MANVILLE CO. 
Toronto Montreal Winnipeg 

For Great Britain and Continent of Europe : 

TURNERS & MANVILLE. LTD.. Hopetouu House. 5. Lloyds Ave.. 

London. E. C. 

Member of the Society for Electrical Development, Inc. 
'•DO IT ELECTRICALLY" 2376 



26 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Februaky 6, 1915 



1 Blocks of Track Already 
Slated for Renewal 

— Saved by the 



"Reciprocating" 
Track Grinder 

The track was in very bad shape 
and the reciprocating grinder was 
tried as an experiment. 
By cutting out a few of the very 
worst joints, tamping a little and 
with days of grinding the track is 
today in first class condition al- 
though pronounced worthless four 
years ago. 

This company now operates four 
Reciprocating Track Grinders. 
The track is carefully watched and 
as soon as defects become apparent 
— the Reciprocating Grinder is put 
to work. 

This company adopted the Recipro- 
cating Grinder because it avoids 
excess removal of metal— 
— because it assures a perfectly true 
surface and because it gives the 
least interference to car movements. 
Those are the factors that count — 
and they are obtainable only from 
the reciprocating method of grind- 
ing. 

Let us explain to you in detail just 
how the Reciprocating Grinder as 
one of your regular maintenance of 
way tools, will pay big returns on 
the investment. 
Write us for data. 

Railway Track-work Co. 

Heed Building, Philadelphia, Pa. 




"UNIVERSAL 
ROUND TOP 
HANGERS" 

with Revolving Stud and Hexagon Floating 
Jam Nut 

Patented April 19, 1910 




Straight Line 




Single Curve 



^^W Double Curve ^^a 



Standardize your Overhead 

Equipment. 

Use UNIVERSAL ONE-PIECE 

HANGERS, and eliminate all 

line troubles. Descriptive folder 

on request. 

ELECTRIC RAILWAY EQUIPMENT 
COMPANY 

Cincinnati, Ohio 

30 Church Street, New York City 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



a? 




Macallen 
Adjustable Crossing 




Macallen Rigid Crossing 




Standard Splicing Ear 



What the Name 
MACALLEN Means 
on Overhead Material 



Any broad-gauged, widely experienced 
salesman will tell you that in the last analy- 
sis the biggest selling force entering into 
the problem of successful manufacturing 
and marketing is the goods. The cleverest 
salesmen, the most able advertisement writ- 
ers, the most vigorous selling campaigns 
cannot achieve a permanent success unless 
the goods are right. 

Macallen electric railway material has 
succeeded because it deserves to succeed 
— ^because it is designed right — built right 
— of right materials — because it delivers 
the service — and is backed by a square deal' 
policy. 




The Macallen Company 

Macallen and Foundry Sts,, Boston 



3lACALLEr 

MARK. 





Here Is The Thew's Work 



Here Is How The Thew Does It 



Shallow cuts — removal of old macadam for track laying — grading work in 
close quarters — tearing up old track, etc. — these are your problems. The Thew 
is designed especially for such work. The horizontal crowding motion of The 
Thew cuts clean and true to grade — does the work quickly and cheaply. 

Used on old macadam or concrete foundations, the crowding motion is 
reversed to apply a powerful prying motion. 

The Full Circle Szving of The Thew enables it to work in close quarters 
without stopping traffic. 

Write for Catalogue "F" and list of Electric Railways using Thews. 

The Thew Automatic Shovel Co., Lorain, Ohio 



28 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



Frogs, Crossings, Switches and 
Mates for Electric Railway Service 

Products of the Highest Grade Workmanship and Material. 
May we Estimate on Your Requirements? 




BARBOUR-STOCKWELL CO. 

205 Broadway, Cambridge, Mass. 



CAMBRIA 
RAILS 



Open Hearth Bessemer 

BOLTS AND NUTS 

100% 

Splice Bars 

Tie Plates 




All Standard 
Sections 



CAMBRIA STEEL COMPANY 



Philadelphia 



Sales Offices: Atlanta, Boston, Buffalo, Chicago, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Detroit, New York, Philadelphia, 

Pittsburgh, St. Louis, San Francisco, Tacoma, Montreal 

Works at Johnstown. Pa. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



29 



CARNEGIE STEEL COMPANY 



General Offices — Pittsburgh, Pa. 



K^ 1 


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k< 



STEEL 
CROSS TIES 

are absolutely the best and 
cheapest permanent con- 
struction. 

Introduction of econo- 
mies are always desirable, 
especially where they are 
combined with efficiency, as 
in the case of steel ties. 

By their use economy is 
reflected through your va- 
rious departments. 



A Single Welding 
Operation at a Cost 

of $2 Saves Motor 
Housing Worth $165 

The OXWELD 
PROCESS 




Here was a cracked motor frame 36 in. long, 26 in. 
in diameter, weighing 1800 lb. and valued at $165.00. 
The thickness of the metal varied from I to 2 
inches. There was a crack at one end 6 in. long. 
This crack was welded in a few hours by the Oxweld 
Process. Thus the cost of a new housing was saved 
and the motor put back into service with the mini- 
mum loss of time. 



This illustration gives an idea of the utility and 
scope of the Oxweld Process in an electric railway 
shop. 

It shows how a single operation saved at a cost 
of $2 a piece of equipment worth $165. 

Isn't apparatus which will effect such savings 
worth investigation? Write for further particulars. 



CHICAGO, ILL. Oxweld Acetylene Company newark, n. j. 



30 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAI 



[February 6, 1915 



■ Ir.iitDKns cHAc.KLivr. tit^ 

Dj l\ THV: SKVSf:«V?'Ki?si ^1; 

i :ii- .''ea 

j ' :: , . the 

\ jcrac-kiins iii r-Ab:ii:a ri\i^-_~. jua ron- 
j I (racling stce! alarmed ttiein. . 

building refi: 



Cold that causes the contraction 
of steel and other metal surfaces 
often destroys the protecting 
paint film. Paint that dries hard 
and brittle is the first to suffer. 
Through the fissures of a broken 
paint film, rust and decay enter 
and eat their way. 

DIXON'S 

SILICA-GRAPHITE 

PAINT 

" The Longest Service Paint" 

provides an elastic film which is 
neither broken by the expansion 
of extreme heat nor the contrac- 
tion of extreme cold. For this 
and many other good reasons ex- 
plained in booklet No. 108-B you 
should order or specify Dixon's. 

Made in Jersey City, N. J., by the 

Joseph Dixon Crucible Co. 

ESTABLISHED 1827 




FORD 
TRIBLOC 

A CHAIN HOIST that 
Fulfils Every Requirement 

It is built in sizes from 54-ton to 40- 
ton capacity. No matter what size 
you need or how severe the service, 
you will find the Tribloc the most sat- 
isfactory Chain Hoist built. 

It has planetary gearing (which is en- 
closed in a dust-proof steel case), steel 
parts, a 3^-to-l factor of safety in 
its weakest parts, and eighty per cent, 
of the power applied to the hand chain 
is converted into lifting energy. 

The chains and hooks used on the 
Ford Tribloc are of the best material 
and workmanship procurable, and all 
our claims are backed by a five-year 



guarantee. 



We also build Screw Hoists, Differ- 
ential Hoists, and Steel Plate Trol- 
leys. Our catalog describes them 
all. Write for your copy now. 



FORD CHAIN BLOCK 
& MFG. COMPANY 

142 Oxford Street, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



31 




The Steam Hammer that is 
Always Ready for Use 

When the smith goes to his steam hammer with a job, he wants 
to find it in perfect running condition, and ready for action the 
instant he moves the operating levers. ■ -•»■ 

Bement Steam Hammers 

are so designed that with very little attention they can be oper- 
ated continuously without breakdowns. Here are a iew of the 
features that enable Bement Hammers to be always oh the job. 



■crjS 



Valves Simple and 
Substantial 

The main valve is simple 
and substantial, consist- 
ing of but few moving 
pieces which require 
practically no adjust- 
ment. The throttle valve 
is of the rotary type, 
simple, and requiring no 
particular care for its 
maintenance. 



Wear Readily Taken Care of 

The guides are provided with taper 
shoes so that the wear of the ram is 
readily taken up. Valve gearing is de- 
signed to have its downward motion 
by its own weight so that lost motion 
due to wear has no bad effect on the 
operation of the hammer. The main 
valve is of the piston type balanced 
in a bushing and hence does not bear 
or wear on the main cylinder casting. 



Write for Catalog "Bement Hammers." Sizes 250 to 40,000 lbs. 

NILES-BEMENT-POND CO. 

Ill Broadway, NEW YORK 

Boston Detroit Philadelphia Birmingham 

Pittsburgh St. Louis Chicago London 



THIS PRESS WILL STRAIGHTEN YOUR CAR 
AXLES PROPERLY AND ECONOMICALLY 



We have furnish-ed many car shops with hydraulic presses of 
this type for straightening axles, shafting and bars, and for 
doing hundreds 'of odd bending jobs. 



Hand Tower 
Bar Straightening 
Press 




The ram has a vertical movement of 4 in. 
The idle portion of the stroke to and from 
the work is accomplished by a rack and 
pinion independent of the pump. The bend- 
ing blocks and roller stands are adjustable 
to any position on the bed. The traveling 
frame permits a bending operation at any 
point between the roller frames. 

We build many sizes of hydraulic bend- 
ers, all as carefully designed as this ma- 
chine to give the user the best service. 

Write for catalog 82 giving details of our 
big line of railway hydraulic machines in- 
cluding Jacks, Forcing Presses, Pit Jacks, 
Wheel Presses, Shears, Bending Presses, etc. 

The Watson- Stillman Co. 

Engineers and Builders of Hydraulic Machinery 

46 Church Street New York 



CHICAGO— McCormick Building. 
PHILADELPHIA— The Bourse. 
PITTSBURGH— Brown & Zortman. 
ST. LOUIS— Corby Supply Co, 
KANSAS CITY— Geo. f. Cook. 
DENVER— L. C. Ullrich. 
ATLANTA— Sterling G. Turner. 






32 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



VANADIUM STEEL 

ROTOR RINGS 




VANADIUM STEEL ROTOR END RING. 



As a result of thorough tests, the Allis - Chalmers 
Manufacturing Company have adopted vanadium 
steel as standard for the rotor end rings of their turbo- 
generators. Previously they were rsing chrome- 
nickel steel. . 

Peripheral speeds of these rotors vary from i8,ooo 
to 24,000 feet per minute. Stresses in the rings are 
consequently high. 

Allis-Chalmers adopted vanadium steel for these highly 
stressed parts because of the higher and more uniform 
physical properties. 

Their report on the subject is given in " Facts." 

Write for copy. 



AMERICAN VANADIUM COMPANY 

343 Vanadium Building, Pittsburgh 



The Allis-Chalmers 3 
Air Compressor 

is SMALLER— LIGHTER— HAS 
NO GEARS and yet has GREAT- 
ER CAPACITY than the Ordinary 
Compressor. 

Weighs 390 (425 with cage) as compared to 850 lbs. 
Height is 14 inches as compared to 25 inches 

Type AA7 




Direct 
Connected 




Write for Bulletin 



Some of the Advantages of the 

Allis-Chalmers AA7 Air Compressor 

over other compressors of the same type — 

One-Piece Herringbone Gear, insuring accurate meshing and great 
strength — Replaceable Bushing takes the wear in the cylinder and obviates 
the High Cost of Reboring — Pipeless Construction facilitating easy re- 
moval of Cylinder Head— Improved Brush Holder, adjustable with screw- 
driver. Oil supplied through one vent and distributed automatically. 

ALLIS-CHALMERS MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

MILWAUKEE. WIS. 

For all Canadian business refer to Canadian Allis-Chalmers Co., Ltd., Toronto, 

Ontario, Canada. 
FOREIGN REPRESENTATIVES: H. I. Keen, 732 Salisbury House, London Wall. 
E C, London, Eng. Frank R. Perrot, 883 Hay St., Perth, W. Australia. Frank R. 
Perrot, 204 Clarence St., Sydney, N. S. W, Mark R. L^mb, Huerfanos 1157, Casill.i 
2652, Santiago, Chile. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



33 




The Problem 
of the 
Interurban 



The Foul 
Air Problem 
of the City 
Car 



BOTH are Solved by Use of 

The ODORLESS DISINFECTANT 




It acts at once, purifying and deodorizing 
the air, killing floating typhoid, diphtheria ' •■■"''■ 

and pus bacteria and sweetening and sterilizing what- 
ever it comes in contact with. 

Requires but a few ounces of O D liquid to the gallon of 
water to make a disinfecting scrubbing solution for floors 
seats, straps, toilets, etc., etc. 

Its germicidal or germ-killing qualities and its value as a preventive of con- 
tagion is proven by tests and reports of eminent bacteriological experts. 

Put up in quantities from two-gallon size to 5-barrel lots. We can cite you the 
best of references and indorsements. 

Send us trial order. Prices on request. 

Gardner & Company ^ Joliet, III. 

WRITE FOR DESCRIPTIVE LITERATURE 



Mark 





S£^©©©©©®©®©©©©©©©®©© 



B-V 

Visible 
Punches 



Standard Open Sight Punch 
Quick and Accurate 



The conductor can see through the punch, 
enabling him to punch the correct spot with 
speed and precision. This is a great advan- 
tage, especially on lines where traffic is heavy, 
promoting better service in behalf of both 



company and public. 

The tool steel dies in B-V Punches insure 
long service and economy. They cost no 
more than the ordinary kind. Send for prices 
and catalog. 



BONNEY-VEHSLAGE TOOL COMPANY 

124 Chambers Street, New York Factory, Newark, N. J. 



0©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©© ©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©© 



34 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



IT 



RAILWAY UNE MATERIAL 
FOR DIRECT SUSPENSION 



The Guarantee 
of Excellence 




on Goods 
Electrical 




The Guarantee 
of Excellence 




on Goods 
Electrical 



GENERAL EIZCMC COMPANY 



Send for your copy of this new bulletin just off the press. 

It lists every device for direct suspension made by the 
General Electric Company and contains much valuable general 
information and engineering data relative to the subject of line 
material. Every electric railway purchasing agent and engi- 
neer should have a copy of this catalog. 

Ask for Bulletin No. 44004— It's free. 



General Electric Company 



Atlanta, Ga. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Boston, Mass. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Butte, Mont. 
Charleston, W. Va. 
Charlotte, N. C. 
Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Chicago, 111. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 



Cleveland, Ohio 
Columbus, Ohio 
Dayton, Ohio 
Denver, Colo. 
Des Moines, Iowa 
Detroit, Mich. 

(Office of Agent) 
Duluth, Minn. 
Elmira. N. Y. 
Erie, Fa. 
Fort Wayne, Ind. 



General Office: Schenectady, N. Y. 
ADDRESS NEAREST OFFICE 



Hartford, Conn. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Jacksonville, Fla. 

ioplin, Mo. 
Kansas City, Mo. 




Knoxvillc, Tenn. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Memphis, Tenn. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 



Minneapolis. Minn. 
Nashville, Tenn. 
New Haven, Conn, 
New Orleans, La. 
New York, N. Y. 
Niagara Falls, N. Y, 
Omaha, Neb. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 
Portland, Ore. 
Providence, R. I. 
Richmond, Va. 



Rochester, N. Y. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Salt Lake City, Utah 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Schenectady, N. Y. 
Seattle, Wash. 
Spokane, Wash. 
Springfield, Mass. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
Toledo, Ohio. 
Washington, D. C. 
Youngstown, Ohio 



For Texas, Oklahoma and Arizona busineta refer to Southwest General Electric Company (formerly Hobson Electric Co.), Dallas, El Paso, 
Houston and Oklahoma City. For Canadian business refer to Canadian General Electric Company, Ltd., Toronto, Ont, 



5308 



Electric Railway Journal 

Published by the McGraw Publishing Company, Inc. 
Consolidation of Street Railway Journal and Electric Railway Review 



Vol. XLV 



NEW YORK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1915 



No. 6 



THE 

NEW ORLEANS 

MODEL CAR 



The new car for New Orleans 
which is described on another 
page of this issue stands unique, 
if such a term can be applied to conservative design, 
as a combination of practically everything that has fully 
demonstrated its worth in modern car construction. 
Naturally, the most prominent feature is the invasion 
of the South — that stronghold of the wooden car — by an 
all-steel design. Next in interest is, perhaps, the fact 
that the weight, 36,100 lb. for a 47-ft. 8-in. car, is one 
of the lowest that has been recorded. However, that 
the low weight was not attained by skimping the struc- 
ture is manifest from the published sizes of the mem- 
bers as well as from the illustrations, which show con- 
structions that remind one almost of steam railroad 
practice rather than the usages common to city surface 
cars. One innovation of special importance for electric 
railways, but which may not be particularly obvious, is 
the absolute elimination of ornamental painting on the 
car body — something from which it is well rid. Of 
course, the painting schemes of recent years have been 
vastly less objectionable than the "moving van" styles of 
the earliest days. Yet there has seemed to be no ten- 
dency to give up the principle of arraying surface cars 
in all the colors of the rainbow supplemented with 
enough perfectly useless information in gilt letters to 
supply a correspondence school. The start that has 
been made by New Orleans toward plain, and therefore 
sensible, painting is most acceptable. In conclusion, the 
use of end platforms on such a model car may, perhaps, 
require comment, and it is only fair to the center-en- 
trance principle to say that the "Jim Crow" law of New 
Orleans practically prohibited its consideration. On the 
other hand, of course, this is no proof that otherwise 
the center-entrance would have been used. 



AN UNUSUAL 

"FLYWHEEL 

EFFECT" 



Some years ago when the three- 
phase locomotive was attracting 
considerable attention on account 
of its extensive adoption on the Italian State Railways 
and elsewhere, quite a little stress was laid upon the 
way in which stored energy distributes "itself in that 
system. If there are a number of three-phase trains 
in motion their energy is available to assist the power 
plant in starting another train. The draft of power 
by the accelerating train has a tendency to slow down 
the whole system, reducing the frequency, and for a 
time the moving trains draw less power and thus re- 
lieve the power station. That the same phenomenon 
appears in the single-phase system and must for the 
same reason appear also in heavy d.c. systems is indi- 
cated by the recent experience of the New Haven 



road, as described by W. S. Murray. When the heavy 
extra loads were imposed on the system by the elec- 
trification from Stamford to New Haven the peaks of 
power-plant load which were to be expected in view of 
the enormous freight trains handled did not material- 
ize. In fact the form of the power-plant load line was 
improved. This resulted from the lowering of voltage 
due to heavy draft of current, the voltage dropping 
suddenly and leaving the operating trains moving at 
speeds higher than those corresponding to the reduced 
voltage. Their loads were thus taken off the power 
station and relieved it to that extent while they were 
coasting. In this way from different immediate causes, 
but fundamentally on the same general principle, rail- 
way systems employing constant-speed and variable- 
speed motors act like huge flywheels. 



CONFERENCES 

WITH 

COMMISSIONS 



It is difficult to understand why 
the Public Service Commission for 
the First District of New York 
has been subjected to suspicious criticisms during the 
last week because Secretary Whitney testified that con- 
ferences are often held between the individual com- 
missioners and officers of the public utilities in the dis- 
trict. Perhaps these criticisms can be explained, but 
not excused, by reference to the dust-covered idea that 
public service commissions are grand juries to hear 
testimony against the utilities without permitting them 
to enter replies. The true function of regulating 
bodies, as now generally stated, is to act as a mediator 
between the public and the corporations and not to 
serve as an ex parte tribunal in either direction. It is 
absurd to suppose that corporation officials have not 
the same right of presentment of data that is bestowed 
upon public complainants. Wherein, then, lies the 
wrong — that the conferences are not public and that 
some complaints are dropped thereafter? In truth, 
such objections would betray a most lamentable lack of 
a proper understanding of commission work — -such an 
understanding as led the engineer of one of the West- 
ern commissions recently to say that the informal com- 
plaints settled by any commission measure much of the 
real service being rendered by it. Sixty per cent of the 
complaints received by this commission are settled by 
informal conferences with the utilities, and it is stated 
that the ideal condition would exist if 90 per cent of the 
work were handled in this way. The saving in time, 
cost and temper secured by the settling of as many 
complaints as possible in an informal manner makes the 
method highly desirable, and the charge or even the 
suspicion of star-chamber proceedings under this prac- 
tice betrays ignorance and nothing more. 



266 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[VOL. XLV, No. 6 



SPIRIT OF It is but a few days since the 

MID- YEAR American Electric Railway As- 

MEETING sociation met at Washington to 

count among its speakers two leading members of the 
House of Representatives, one member of the Senate 
and the President of the United States ; yet, viewed even 
in the short perspective of a week, it seems clear that 
this meeting marks a definite step toward a better un- 
derstanding between regulators and regulated, When the 
American Electric Railway Association adopted as a 
body the now-famous Code of Principles it cast off to 
the last vestige the slough of foolish secrecy with which 
it had been so long encumbered. It was just as neces- 
sary that the chosen representatives of the people should 
declare themselves with like directness. It was the 
spirit of publicity and co-operation which prompted the 
selection of Washington as the meeting place, and it 
was this spirit which animated the entire convention. 
It is true that neither the address of the President 
nor the speeches of Senator Weeks and Congressmen 
Sherley and Montague bore directly on the specific 
problems of the electric railway industry. But all of 
them expressed the spirit of aid instead of enmity, of 
future co-operation for past antagonism. Each party 
has cried Peccavi and each party has promised hereafter 
to seek the other's good instead of the other's ill. And 
what is the panacea? Is it publicity alone, full and frank 
as that may be? No, the stronger medicine of common 
honesty, of square dealing, of recognition of mutual 
obligations is needed as a purge to cleanse both our pub- 
lic and private bodies of the toxins with which they have 
been too long poisoned. The American Electric Railway 
Association through its Code of Principles has put 
itself clearly on record for a clean life in a clean body. 
May those who have promised to help the business men 
of the United States show in future a due respect for 
this declaration by imposing an equally high standard 
of conduct on the part of the political men of the United 
States. 



NON-UNIONISM 
A BASIS OF 
EMPLOYMENT 



In clearly establishing the fact 
that the renunciation of union 
affiliations may be demanded as 
a condition of employment, the decision of the United 
States Supreme Court last week in the Kansas Coercion 
Statute case has cleared this phase of the labor ques- 
tion in a way that should be of interest to all electric 
railway officials. The law in question declared that it 
was unlawful, as a condition for obtaining or continu- 
ing employment, to coerce or influence a person to enter 
into an agreement not to join or remain a member of 
a labor organization. The downfall of this law now 
carries with it similar laws in California, Colorado, 
Connecticut, Indiana, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New 
Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Oklahoma, Oregon, 
Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. The abolition ol such 
laws in these states should bring the fact home to all 
that labor contracts are not wholly one-sided instru- 
ments. The trades union theory has always been that 
the employees had a right to control the acts of the em- 
ployer but that the employer had no right to place equal 



or even similar restrictions upon the employees. Jus- 
tice Pitney declares, however, that just as labor organi- 
zations have the inherent and constitutional right to 
deny membership to any man who will not agree that 
during such membership he will not accept or retain 
employment in a company with non-union men, and just 
as a union man has the constitutional right to decline 
proffered employment unless the employer will agree 
not to employ any non-union men, so the employer has 
the constitutional right to insist that his employees 
shall refrain from union affiliations during their term 
of employment. It will undoubtedly come as a surprise 
to labor advocates that employers have any constitu- 
tional rights at all along this line, for they have always 
been obstinately oblivious of the adage that what is 
sauce for the goose is sauce for the gander. 



FAMILIARITY MAY BREED CONTEMPT 

An experienced transportation superintendent re- 
cently brought up a point in the matter of discipline 
which is worth some sober thought by all who are con- 
cerned with the direct handling of men. This official 
found, on taking charge of the platform men on another 
property, that obedience to orders had become a purely 
optional affair with them under the late administration. 
In fact, when the new superintendent demanded obedi- 
ence as his right, they were astonished. Some very 
convincing arguments in the form of direct dismissal 
were required to bring the survivors to their senses. 
Yet the men themselves had been more sinned against 
than sinning. The rod of discipline had been wielded 
so little as to seem a barbarous if not an obsolete instru- 
ment. 

The trouble was that the previous superintendent had 
gone too far in fraternizing with the men. He was not 
content to be with them at an occasional smoker or 
picnic, but had been "one of the boys" evening after 
evening at a bowling alley behind a local saloon. Once 
he had established this intimate acquaintance the men 
knew his foibles far better than he knew theirs, and 
when he ventured to issue a disagreeable order he was 
simply mocked. 

We are told that to make Asiatic peoples believe their 
kings were gods and not mere men, the commonalty 
were never permitted to see their king eat or drink. 
The disciplinary officer who wants to keep the respect 
of his men must also surround himself with just enough 
mystery to seem more than an ordinary man. The fact 
that he administers discipline directly makes it unde- 
sirable for him to be as familiar as the higher officers 
may on occasions, as they are not in close daily con- 
tact with the men. A reasonable degree of aloofness is 
not at all incompatible with square dealing. The sep- 
arate mess for the officers of a ship is not so much a 
matter of snobbishness as a recognition of the fact 
that the officers cannot afford to display their frailties 
before their subordinates. To a certain degree the 
operating officer of a railway must follow this example, 
for he, too, is in an organization where implicit obedi- 
ence means relatively just as much for good service as 
it does in the army or navy. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



267 



THE "BUY IT NOW" MOVEMENT 

A prominent steam railroad official, in commenting on 
the business situation, said recently that if a line 
was drawn north and south through Chicago for a dis- 
tance of 200 miles on each side of that city, and each end 
of the line was then extended west for a distance of 700 
miles and the ends of these lines were joined so as to 
form a parallelogram, it would contain the most pros- 
perous section of the world to-day. 

There is no doubt that the farms of the Central West, 
with a wheat crop of enormous volume and selling at 
high war-time prices, are in a very strong financial 
position. This lends interest to the "Buy It Now" 
movement, launched from Omaha recently through the 
Associated Press. The campaign has extended to other 
cities and has attracted very favorable attention from 
public officials as well as from commercial organiza- 
tions. The plan is well described by President Wilson, 
who said in his recent speech at Indianapolis: "I un- 
derstand that your Chamber of Commerce in Indianap- 
olis is working now upon the motto, 'if you are going 
to buy it, buy it now.' This is a perfectly safe maxim 
to act upon. It is just as safe to buy it now as it ever 
will be, and if you start buying there will be no end to 
it and you will be a seller as well as a buyer." Gov- 
ernor Capper of Kansas, in referring to the abundant 
crops in the Central West and the industrial depression 
in the East, said : "Every dollar wisely spent now tends 
to enliven business, to start the wheels of idle factories, 
to give employment to idle men and to feed the hungry. 
The farmer can not only buy now to better advantage 
than later, but he can perform a patriotic duty by pay- 
ing every indebtedness promptly and by purchasing his 
spring supplies at the earliest possible moment, 'Buy 
It Now.' " Governor Hammond of Minnesota, another 
prosperous state, in a recent interview spoke along sim- 
ilar lines. 

But the movement is not confined to the agricultural 
sections of the country. The Baltimore & Ohio Railroad 
has expressed itself as in full sympathy with such a 
movement and is showing it by placing an order for 2000 
new freight cars, the first order for equipment that has 
been placed by the company in more than a year. In its 
official statement it says in part: "We have already 
purchased $385,000 worth of material in anticipation 
of our requirements for the next six months and are 
just about to enter into contracts for $200,000 worth of 
additional material covering the year's requirements. 
We suppose this is the most practical way in which we 
can aid your movement. We are heartily in accord with 
the work you have in hand." 

Each industry and each company must decide for it- 
self how far it can co-operate in a movement of this 
kind, but if there is to be a revival of industrial activity 
in this country it will necessarily mean larger gross 
receipts for the electric railway companies. We realize 
that each company has many local problems to solve, of 
which in most cases the best method of increasing fares 
is the most important, but the old rule should not be 
forgotten that the best time to make purchases is toward 



the end of a business depression, because prices are then 
nearly always lower than can be secured later. 



MAKING THE NICKEL GO FARTHER 

While the costs of all other elements of railway 
service have gone up that of electrical energy has gone 
ciown. More efficient engines, boilers, generators and 
distribution systems have effected savings in fuel, floor 
space, labor- and incidentals, off-setting to some extent 
at least, increases in wages and cost of materials. It 
has thus been possible to make the cost of the energy 
for operating a car a small and decreasing proportion 
of total operating cost, occupying the order of approxi- 
mately one-seventh of the total. Small as it is, how- 
ever, it offers one opportunity at present for saving or, 
as suggested above, for making the nickel go farther 
in other directions, preferably at present in the line of 
better dividends. 

The unit cost of electrical energy is now about as 
low as we can reasonably expect to get it, and it is 
probable that future improvements will take care of 
increasing unit costs, but not much more. We must 
then look for further economies in the use of energy 
rather than in its production. Here is a fertile field as 
one realizes when he calculates the difference between 
the energy necessary in overcoming friction in moving 
a car between two points and that drawn from the trol- 
ley. Figures quoted on page 231 of last week's issue 
showed that rolling friction in freight trains at slow 
speeds may be as low as 26 watt-hours per ton-mile. On 
the other hand, an electric street car may often use 
150 watt-hours. The difference between these figures is 
worthy of careful study. It does not all represent 
waste, however, for a considerable part is incidental to 
maintaining a reasonable schedule speed with frequent 
stops. 

An energy consumption of 150 watt-hours per ton- 
mile would occur only in high-speed city service with 
frequent stops. It might be roughly divided thus: Ab- 
sorbed by all friction except in brakes and motor losses 
except resistance, 63 watt-hours, or 42 per cent; 
absorbed in brakes, 60 watt-hours, or 40 per cent; loss 
in starting grids, 25 watt-hours, or 16 2/3 per cent, and 
motor-resistance loss, 2 watt-hours, or 1 1/3 per cent. 
In heavier service with less frequent stops the energy 
consumption might be 100 watt-hours per ton-mile, of 
which friction (including air resistance) might absorb 
78 watt-hours; brakes, 15 watt-hours; resistance grids, 
5 watt-hours, and motor resistance, 2 watt-hours. 
These figures, which are approximate only, indicate at 
a glance the possible lines of improvement. In opera- 
tion more coasting gives lower speed at brake applica- 
tion and less braking loss, which is roughly proportional 
to the square of the speed at the instant of application. 
Quicker acceleration permits the same schedule to be 
made with more coasting and is thus conducive to 
saving unless carried to the extreme. This is relatively 
more important in service with frequent stops. In 
such service, also, field control of motors is successful 
in reducing grid losses and permitting more rapid accel- 



268 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 6 



eration owing to the strong field used in starting. After 
all, the most tempting opportunity for saving is prob- 
ably in the line of weight reduction which produces a 
cumulative effect. When this opportunity has been 
exhausted there is still scope for ingenuity in cutting 
down friction. 

In this issue of the Electric Railway Journal we 
print an abstract of a paper on energy saving read a 
few days ago in Chicago by N. W. Storer. In this he 
gives data which are of great interest in the light of 
facts such as those outlined above. 



IS PLATFORM WORK "SKILLED LABOR"? 

In the Bay State Street Railway arbitration of wages 
now proceeding at Boston, Mass., perhaps the most im- 
portant point thus far discussed is whether platform 
work on a car should be considered skilled labor, in the 
usual sense of the term. Counsel for the employees' 
union has devoted many hours to the effort to secure 
admissions from the company's officials that uniformed 
men in the car service should properly be classed as 
skilled laborers, but no such admission is likely to be 
made for the excellent reason that the duties performed 
by motormen and conductors, while calling for the exer- 
cise of proficiency in the handling of equipment and in 
relations with the public, do not justify the classification 
advocated by the union. 

Granted that the duties of the motorman call for 
quickness of perception, intelligence, facility in manipu- 
lation, the use of judgment, and some degree of me- 
chanical apprehension, it is none the less true that the 
rudiments of his occupation can be learned within a 
comparatively few days and that these duties are, while 
varied as to time combination, essentially repetitive. 
As experience is gained, most motormen increase in 
proficiency up to a point which cannot be predicted as 
yet for the individual, but which is approximated in 
sliding scales of wages at from roughly five years to ten 
years of service, generally speaking. Much is made of 
responsibility by those who contend that motormen 
should be classed as skilled laborers, but there is no 
logical connection between responsibility and skill in 
craftsmanship, except that the latter may be a help in 
meeting the former. What is true of the motorman 
applies to the conductor also, to a corresponding degree. 
The latter improves with practice, but the acquisition 
of sufficient knowledge and proficiency to take charge of 
a car is a matter of a very limited time in comparison 
with the many months required to learn a trade suffi- 
ciently well to be of substantial value as an apprentice, 
and to become a first-class workman is a question of 
years compared with the time demanded to become an 
excellent conductor. 

None of these comments is intended to belittle a class 
of men whose faithfulness to duty, forbearance under 
trying conditions, adaptability to a service which con- 
stantly changes in volume if not in form, and whose 
patient, helpful work meets a need of the world which 
calls for ability, physical strength and intelligence in 
all sorts of weathers and in the face of many obstacles. 



But there is no blinking the fact that the occupation of 
a uniformed man on a modern street railway is one 
which can be passably well performed after a period of 
training which is one of the shortest required of intelli- 
gent workers in modern industry; not as well per- 
formed, of course, as after extended experience, but still 
acceptable enough to warrant putting a man on a car 
in charge of its passengers or its equipment surpris- 
ingly soon after his acceptance as an employee. Coun- 
sel for such employees are fond of referring to an elec- 
tric car as a "highly complex locomotive" operated on 
the public highways, but while the complexity of the 
equipment may be admitted, the fact that the motor- 
man's relations to it are almost entirely manipulative 
tells its own story. We may go so far as to grant that 
the quality of skill may be attained in the work of both 
motorman and conductor — skill increasing with time- 
but the officials of the Bay State company are funda- 
mentally right in refusing to class the work of uni- 
formed men with that of cabinet makers, machinists, 
masons, plumbers, printers, or other wage earners whose 
duties require for successful performance long and ardu- 
ous preparation and whose compensation corresponds to 
the superior degree of skill of mind and hand demanded 
by their vocations. 



CHANGE COLOR AND SAVE MONEY 

A prominent superintendent of car equipment re- 
cently stated in conversation that if he was permitted 
to make an unrestricted choice of the shades of color 
with which his cars were painted he could save $5 per 
car at each painting without changing the quality of 
the work. The point is an interesting one. Of course, 
the economy is somewhat petty, but during the present 
lean years in electric railway affairs it can hardly be 
neglected on this score. 

As a matter of fact, on any railway it is quite possible 
that a change in color might even appeal to the taste 
of the public more than a retention of the old hues. 
Indeed, it seems off-hand that there is no known color, 
except perhaps pink, that is not used for the street cars 
in at least one of the many cities in the country. Greens 
and reds, of course, predominate, but blues and browns 
and yellows have many supporters, and if any certain 
color can be accepted by the people of one city it is 
hardly reasonable to suppose that those of another 
community cannot stand a change to the same color. 

In general, the selection of the color scheme for elec- 
tric cars seems to be one of the few duties that rail- 
way presidents are absolutely unwilling to transfer to 
the shoulders of their less gifted subordinates, but when 
the president has made a decision regarding a color 
scheme, the time and effort that have been devoted to 
it are worth, from an artistic standpoint, exactly noth- 
ing. Any other color, if well maintained, would im- 
press the riding public just as favorably, and the im- 
pression on the public is, so far as we can see, the only 
reason for painting cars with anything better than the 
rough but cheerful red made familiar through its uni-; 
versal use on barns and box cars. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



269 



Naturally, this should not be construed as an argu- 
ment in favor of such a grade of paint for street cars. 
Electric railways owe it to the communities they serve 
to provide neat-looking equipment, and to this end the 
so-called "coach colors" are no doubt necessary be- 
cause of their body and susceptibility to high finish. 
On the other hand, the railways are not obligated to 
make their cars look like the proverbial Joseph's coat. 
Therefore the cheapest and most durable of the coach 
colors would be the most satisfactory from the rail- 
tways' standpoint, and it ought to be as uniformly used 
for street railway service as is box-car red for freight 
trains or "Pullman color" for sleeping cars. The op- 
portunity for economy is definite enough, because the 
prices of the numerous coach colors in general use vary 
through a range of several hundred per cent, and the 
steps upward from the undefineable greenish-brown that 
is known as "Pullman color" through the dull yellows, 
the greens, the blues and the light reds are sufficient 
to make the latter prohibitively costly in comparison 
with the former. 

It has been said by one of our correspondents that 
nothing that a manufacturer could do would cause a 
mrailroad, either steam or electric, to make a change 
ifrom its standard color scheme. This would probably 
be true if the use of a new color could not be made to 
^how an advantage either in lasting quality or in cost, 
Dut when a tangible result can be attained the difficulty 
)f overcoming the railroads' conservatism ought not to 
oe insurmountable. What is needed is that the manu- 
facturers' specialists in color-mixing shall be called 
jpon to point the way toward the least expensive com- 
)inations and not be told, as they are now, to make 
luotations upon colors that are arbitrarily selected 
without regard for cost or durability. 



TREND OF ELECTRIC RAILWAY EARNINGS 

In our issue of Jan. 23 we published an abstract of the 
report just given out by the bureau of fare research on 
the subject of electric railway statistics for June, July, 
August and September of 1914. The data submitted 

, ,3nly serve to confirm the evident fact that the year 
L914, with its accumulating gloom of business and 
financial depression and the European War, was not 

I j:onducive to electric railway prosperity. That electric 

, :arriers did not suffer more than they did was entirely 
owing to the necessary character of the commodity f ur- 
■nished by such carriers and the careful administration 
jby their officials. 

i It may be recalled that this paper, in its issue of 
JNov. 28, page 1217, compiled the earnings of. all com- 

^ panies making public reports for September, 1914 and 
'1913, and that the result showed a total decrease in 
gross earnings of 1.4 per cent and in net earnings of 



2.24 per cent, or, if Western returns were eliminated 
on account of meagerness, 0.87 per cent for gross earn- 
ings and 1.24 per cent for net earnings. These figures 
iwere static, in a sense — that is, the month of September 
in both 1914 and 1913 was lifted away from the re- 
mainder of the months and an analysis made as of those 
two particular months. The data, however, compiled 



by the bureau of fare research for the four months of 
1914 are in running form. They lack the feature of 
comparison with the preceding year's results, but they 
are of value in indicating the trend of gross earnings 
and operating expenses that led up to the condition in 
September as analyzed by this paper. 

With the returns for June, 1914, as a basis, it can be 
seen from the bureau's figures that the gross earnings, 
after a slight expansion with the heavy traffic of July, 
gradually fell until in September they were only 96.24 
per cent of the June amount. Similarly, the operating 
expenses, after a slight rise in July, by September 
dropped to 95.11 per cent of the June total. A consider- 
able portion of the decreases was undoubtedly caused 
by the seasonal variations in traffic. Yet if, as the 
bureau points out, the earnings for June and July from 
year to year are substantially equal to those of August 
and September, the two middle months being most af- 
fected by these seasonal variations, then it seems that 
in this section of 1914 certain depressing influences 
were at work, for the returns of the last two months 
failed to keep up to the stated standard of the first two 
months. This is not at all surprising, however, for the 
increasing tightness of business and finance, the closing 
down of industrial plants and the cutting off of em- 
ployee traffic that followed the outbreak of the Euro- 
pean War in August may justly be considered to have 
retarded the seasonal traffic that might logically have 
been expected in August and September. 

What, then, do the data really show? Simply that 
the static condition given by this paper for the month 
of September was mostly a result of influences which, 
beyond the control of the electric railways, accumu- 
lated the decreases in gross and net earnings over a 
period of at least four but particularly two months. 
Incidentally, too, it may be remarked that the statistics 
bring out the effect upon net earnings caused by slight 
reductions in gross earnings. Under normal conditions 
an increase in gross earnings is a greater financial ad- 
vantage than a proportionate decrease in operating ex- 
penses. The reason for this is that a large part of the 
operating cost is fixed and does not fluctuate in accord- 
ance with the amount of business done, so that a greater 
net return is caused by an extension of the revenue- 
producing power than by a reduction in expenses. It 
follows, therefore, that a decrease in gross earnings is 
more detrimental to a carrier than a decrease in operat- 
ing expenses; for the latter cannot as a rule be de- 
creased to the same extent and may be simply deferred, 
with the result that the small margin of profit on which 
the company is operated and its rate of return may be 
seriously impaired. This state of affairs is mentioned 
in the bureau's report, but, as before, we find solace 
in the fact that the causes are external and not likely to 
be permanent. It will undoubtedly require time for 
electric railways to be restored to their former basis 
of prosperity, but individuals in all sections of the coun- 
try who are keeping their fingers on the pulse of busi- 
ness are predicting a general revival, from which elec- 
tric railways, of course, will secure their share of 
benefit. 



270 ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL [Vol. XLV, No. 6 

New Cars for New Orleans 

These Cars Combine All of the Most Modern Developments in Design, Having Fully-Inclosed Platform! 

Arched Roofs with Ventilators, AU-Steel Construction Except for Wooden Sheathing on Roof and Floor, 

and a Novel Form of Pressed-Steel Carline Which Fits into the Hollow Side Post 



The New Orleans Railway & Light Company has just 
placed in service a lot of fifty cars of a type which 
may become standard for this property. The new design 
constitutes a radical departure from the practice that 
has heretofore been the rule in Southern cities, as the 
frame construction is all-steel, only the roof sheath- 
ing and floor being of wood. In addition, plain-arched 
roofs equipped with ventilators have been adopted as 
well as fully-inclosed platforms without bulkheads. Al- 
together, the design constitutes an excellent example 
of the most modern developments in surface-car con- 
struction. 

As shown in the accompanying reproductions of prog- 
ress photographs, the construction gives the impression 
of being much more substantial than usual for standard 
city service. The desire of the designers to reduce 
maintenance to a minimum is, in fact, manifest through- 
out, and the utmost simplicity of construction has 
been made the rule, filler blocks and other parts that 
form no essential part of the structure having been 
rigidly eliminated. The desire to reduce maintenance 
expense has even resulted in the adoption of two-motor 



Notwithstanding this substantial construction, hov 
ever, the elimination of unnecessary parts and the ger 
eral utilization of the full strength of the various men 
bers has resulted in a total weight of only 36,100 11 
This weight does not include heaters which are nc 
needed in the mild climate of New Orleans, and in con 
parisons with the weights of other cars an allowanc 
should be made for this. Nevertheless, that the car i 
of large size for the unusually light weight is show 
by the following table of general dimensions: 

Length over corner posts 34 ft. 8 in. ' 

Length over bumpers 47 ft. 8 in. 

Width over all at window rail 8 ft. 7 in. 

Width over eave mold 8 ft. .'> % ii 

Height from top of rail to top of trolley board 11 ft. 3% li 

Truck centers 23 ft. 5Vi i) 

Wheelbase of truck 4 ft. 10 in. 

General Arrangement 

The car is provided with eighteen cross-seats of th 
Walkover type, and there are four stationary longitud 
nal seats at the ends of the car, each holding four seate 
passengers, giving a total seating capacity of fifty-tw( 

To provide accessibility the body has been hung a 




Mii^ihik^ 






f 






NEW ORLEANS CAR — GENERAL VIEW OF CAR, SHOWING ELIMINATION OF ORNAMENTAL PAINTING 



equipments with 55-65-hp motors and 30-in. wheels in 
preference to four of the so-called baby motors with 
24-in. wheels, notwithstanding the fact that the ad- 
vantages of a low floor were fully recognized by the de- 
signers. In this case the cost of up-keep for two large 
motors was considered to be enough less than that for 
four small ones to offset the saving in weight and floor 
height effected by using the latter. 

The combination of substantial construction and ease 
of maintenance at which the designers aimed is exempli- 
fied by the post and carline design. Both posts and 
carlines have been made of pressed-steel members, the 
carlines fitting into the tops of the posts and being 
rigidly riveted to them. In consequence the posts and 
carlines form a series of continuous members extending 
around the superstructure from one side sill to the 
other, a construction that has heretofore been used only 
in connection with light, continuous T-bars. 



low as possible over the 30-in. wheels. The first ste 
is 13% in. from the rail level and the second step to th 
level of the platform is 11 in. A 7%-in. step brings th 
passenger to the car floor at the end sill, and a ramp o 
31/4 in. extends from this point to the bolster, makin 
the total height of the floor 35% in. above the rail, wit? 
out passenger load. 

The inclosed platforms at both ends of the car ar 
6 ft. 2 in. long from front of vestibule dash to corn€ 
posts, and 7 ft. 3 in. wide over vestibule corner post 
No bulkheads are installed, and the longitudinal seat 
at the ends of the body provide large floor spaces a( 
joining the platforms. Three seats on each side of eac 
end of the car are fitted with brass sockets in the ser 
backs for the reception of the race-division, or "Jii. 
Crow," signs. This arrangement gives flexibility ail' 
convenience in allotting the space allowed for colorf 
patrons, who are assigned to the rear of the car r 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



271 



gardless of its direction. The main aisle is 26 in. wide 
between seat ends and 29 in. wide between seat backs. 
The aisle space at the longitudinal seats is 57 in. 

Each platform is provided with double folding doors 
on the entrance side and a single sliding door on the 
exit side. All doors are inter-connected with their re- 



between it and the end sill. Portable and adjustable 
seats are furnished for both conductor and motorman. 
Enameled stanchions are provided at the entrance 
archway at the usual bulkhead location and also at the 
entrance and exit doors. The latter stanchions are so 
placed as to encourage passengers to take the proper 




This Bide of Platform 
it ^'Lower tbtut Opp-Side 



Sl4etrie Bf,Journat 



NEW ORLEANS CAR — GENERAL PLAN AND ELEVATION 



spective steps so that upon closure of the door its step 
is folded simultaneously, Burdette-Rountree mechan- 
isms being used. The entrance or folding doors give a 
clear opening of 54 in., this opening being divided into 
entrance and exit portions by the installation of a ver- 
tical, white-enameled stanchion approximately in the 
center of the space. The door operating stand is lo- 
cated on the center line of the car and 11 y2 in. from 
the end sill, leaving room for the conductor to stand 




hand hold in boarding and in alighting, and thus acci- 
dents arising from this source are minimized. Instead 
of hand straps in the body of the car, white-enameled 
tubing is arranged over the longitudinal seats in a hori- 
zontal position and in a convenient location for hand 
holds. The enameled hand-holds and stanchions are 
coated with a glass-hard material that is baked on at 
high temperature, these having been furnished by the 
Ellcon Company. 

Steel Construction 

With the exception of floor and roof, the car is built 
of steel throughout. The underframe consists of two 



^^HT 



1 ri" 

MQ.W 0»up/|! i 



Section B-B 

Carline 



NEW ORLEANS CAR — CROSS-SECTION, SHOWING DETAILS Of 
SIDE CONSTRUCTION 




Section D-D 
Through Post 

Slwtrie Ry^Jimmal 



NEW ORLEANS CAR — DETAILS OF SIDE POST AND CARLINE 
CONSTRUCTION 



272 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 6 





NEW ORLEANS CAR — SIDE GIRDERS AND FLOOR FRAMING 
BEFORE INSTALLATION OF POSTS 



NEW ORLEANS CAR — SUPERSTRUCTURE FRAMING, INCLUD- 
ING PANELS AND HEADER AT END OF BODY 



side-girders made up of No. 12 gage steel plates, which 
are 30-in. wide and 34 ft. 8 in. long when assembled. 
The top member of this girder is a S^-in. x 1-in. x %- 
in. dropper bar, and the bottom member is a 4-in. x 3-in. 
X 5/16-in. angle. Two splice plates are introduced in 
the length of each girder, and reinforcement against 
buckling is provided at the bolsters by means of 4-in. x 
5-in. x %-in. angle and a 4y2-in. x 3-in. x %-in. vertical 
tee, securely riveted to the girder web. The bottom 
member at the side of each girder is bent inward at the 
end sill and the two members meet at the center line of 
the car, where they are spliced together to form the 
end sills. In addition, a 3/16-in. x SVa-in. plate is se- 
curely riveted to the above-mentioned angles and this 
is reinforced on the bottom with a SVo-in. x 2y2-in. x 
%-in. angle. 

Frequent crossings composed of 4-in., 5.25-lb. chan- 
nels fasten the two girders together and provide a sup- 
port for the flooring, and the underframe is further 
stiffened by the use of diagonal members consisting of 
2y2-in. X yi-in. steel bars. Generous gusset plates also 
are fastened to bottom angle and crossing channels. The 
top angle of the girder is covered with an oak window 
rail which also furnishes an arm rest on the inside of 
car. 

The main platform knees are made up of a flat plate 
of No. 10 gage steel cut in a concave-wedge shape and 
reinforced on one side by means of 2y2-in. x 2y2-in. x 
lA-in. and 3y2-in. x 2y2-in. x %-in. angles. These plat- 
form knees are securely riveted to the end sills and to 




the cast-steel body bolster, no bolts being used, and the 
outer ends are riveted to a 7-in. section of channel- 
shaped Hedley anti-climber which serves in place of the 
usual crown pieces. The auxiliary platform knees con- 
sist of 4-in. channels bent to the proper shape and riv- 
eted to the end sill and bolsters. 

The car posts are unique. They are made of No. 16 
gage steel plate which is pressed into a "U"-shape, the 
flanges of this being securely riveted to the side girder. 
The outside of each post above the side girder is cov- 
ered with a No. 16 gage plate that is riveted to the 
flanges of the "U." The inside of the post is covered 
with No. 18 gage sheet steel that is molded into proper 
form to take the rack for the window fasteners and to 
provide runways for the curtain fixtures. This mold- 
ing is fastened to the post by means of hollow screws. 

The carlines also are composed of pressed "U" shaped 
sections and they are securely riveted and bolted to the 
tops of the posts, the carlines fitting inside of the posts 
and thus forming a practically continuous member ex- 
tending from one side of the car to the other. The end 
headers and corner posts consist of pressed steel sec- 
tions of a deep "U"-shape. These are riveted together 
at the spring line of the arch of the header and are 
further riveted to the pier panel which extends be- 
tween each corner post and nearest side post. The 
headers are covered with wooden furring strips and 
the roof boards are through-bolted to these furring 
strips and to the flanges of the carlines. 

The vestibule posts are all of pressed steel, the two 









VicJ 


i 


1 


HE^^ 




M "si 


1 


r 


|5| 





NEW ORLEANS CAR^-STEEL FRAMING COMPLETE, INCLUD- 
ING LETTERBOARD AND VESTIBULE SHEATHING 



NEW ORLEANS CAR — CAR STRUCTURE COMPLETE WITH 
FLOOR AND ROOF SHEATHING APPLIED 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



273 



center posts being made in one section of No. 16 gage 
steel and the corner vestibule posts in two sections of 
No. 12 gage steel securely riveted together. These 
posts are bolted to an angle-iron sprung to the proper 
radius and fastened to the crown piece. The vestibule 
is made of No. 16 gage sheets bolted to the outside of 
the vestibule posts, and there is also a lining plate on 
the inside of the vestibule posts, which provides pockets 
into which the sash may lower. The outside of the ves- 
tibule is provided with the usual bumper shield. 

The letterboard is continuous throughout the whole 
length of the car body, and it is reinforced between posts 
with a %-in. x %-in. x Vg-in. angle. It is 16 in. wide 
and is not only riveted to the posts but is bent over onto 
the arch of the roof and riveted to the carlines to stiffen 
the roof framing transversely. The vestibule top plates 
consists of a 2V'2-in. x 1%-in. x %-in. angle continuous 
from body corner post to body corner post. 

Finish and Interior Fittings 

The floor consists of tongued-and-grooved yellow 
pine, laid lengthwise of the car and depressed at the 
aisle section so that the top of the floor-mat is level 




NEW ORLEANS CAR — INTERIOR VIEW 

with the top of the floor at the side seats. The floor 
mats consist of narrow strips of maple screwed to the 
flooring. The roof consists of %-in. tongued-and- 
grooved poplar through-bolted to the carlines and cov- 
ered with No. 8 canvas duck. 

The drip rail is made up of wood and bolted to the 
letterboard. The canvas of the roof comes down over 
the upper part of this drip rail and is tacked to it with 
copper tacks, following steam railroad practice. This 
drip rail is continuous around vestibules. The curtain 
box is formed of No. 22 gage steel that is divided into 
sections each covering one curtain and arranged for 
ready removal for access to curtains and fixtures. 

Headlining has been installed notwithstanding the 
wooden roof sheathing because of the extreme heat of 
the summer sun in New Orleans. It consists of 3/16-in. 
agasote separated into convenient sections, the joints 
being covered, with light cherry molding, and this mold- 
ing matches the molding which carries the lighting 
wires through the body of the car. The usual space is, 
of course, allowed for advertising cards. The bottom 
sash is arranged to raise so as to give a clear opening 
of 271/2 in. but the top sash is stationary and is fas- 



tened to the post caps with screws installed from the 
outside of car. 

The interior finish is dark cherry color throughout, 
but the headlining is painted light green. The interior 
of the car has been rubbed down to a dull finish after 
varnishing and it presents a very neat and attractive 
appearance, the finish of the steel making a very good 
match with the woodwork of the seats and moldings. 
The outside of the car is painted a light olive green, and, 
as will be noticed in the accompanying illustration, 
all unnecessary ornamentation has been rigidly elimi- 
nated. The only striping or lettering appears on the 
dash, and this consists of the car number and an alum- 
inum stripe around the edge of the dash plates. 

Ventilation is provided by means of eight Railway- 
Utility suction ventilators. The seats are of the stand- 
ard Hale & Kilburn No. 300 type, fitted with wooden 
cushions and backs. A Consolidated push-button sys- 
tem is installed for signaling the motorman. The side 
curtains are of pantasote fitted with Forsyth Rex type 
rollers and No. 88 ring fixtures. Motorman's curtains 
are also installed. Keystone signs are located in the 
center vestibule sash at each and in the rear side win- 
dow, the boxes for these signs being made of steel in 
all cases. Crouse-Hinds headlights and Earle trolley 
catchers are also provided. A double-fare International 
register is located at one end of the car and this is oper- 
ated from either end by means of a register rod in- 
stalled in the center of the car close to the headlining. 
The bell cord to the motorman's signal bell is run in 
conduit above the headlining. 

The lighting layout provides four circuits of five 
lights each, giving a total of twenty 23-watt tungsten 
lamps. A very neat and convenient arrangement for 
the light switches is provided by the installation of a 
switch cabinet in the pier panel of the No. 1 end of 
the car. The door of this cabinet is flush with the in- 
terior trim and it contains all the switches except those 
for the compressor, the latter being located on the dash 
convenient to the motorman. The compressor switches 
are wired in parallel so that passengers on the rear 
platform cannot inadvertently cut off the compressor 
circuit. 

Weights and Propulsion Equipment 

The service conditions under which these cars operate 
are as follows: Schedule speed 10.8 m.p.h. ; average 
stops per mile, 7.25; average duration of stops, 4.5 sec- 
onds; average line potential, 510 volts; rate of accelerat- 
ing and braking, 1.5 m.p.h.p.s. ; average passenger load, 
4500 lb. The total weight of the car, fully equipped and 
ready to run, is 36,100 lb., or 694 lb. per seat. This 
weight is made up as follows: 

Two maximum traction trucks complete with wheels, 

axles, frame, boxes and brake rigging 10,700 lb. 

Electrical equipment en trucks consisting of motors, gears 

and gear case 5,800 lb. 

Electrical equipment on car body, including controllers, 

cables, circuit breakers, trolley bases, poles, etc 1,400 1b. 

Air and hand-brake rigging 1,800 lb. 

Car body complete, including all accessories 16,400 1b. 

The trucks are of the Brill 39-E, maximum-traction 
type. They are fitted with 30-in. driving wheels and 
21-in. pony wheels, and have a wheelbase of 4 ft. 10 in. 
The driving axles are heat-treated, association standard, 
E. B. type, while the trailer axles are of 4-in. diameter 
and are made in accordance with Pennsylvania Railroad 
standard. The wheels have the association standard, B, 
tread with %-in. flange and 2y2-in. tread. The wheels 
are of the single plate type and are made of cast iron. 
The truck bolster is provided with an auxiliary spring 
placed between it and the elliptical side spring which 
provides easy riding under conditions of partial load. 
The journal boxes are of the Brill type and are made of 
semi-steel. 



274 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 6 



The car is equipped with two General-Electric 201-1 
motors of 55-65 hp, the gear ratio being 15-71. The 
controllers are GE standard K-36-J. All power wiring 
is carried in conduit. Grade "M" solid gears and pinions 
are used, the face of gears being 5-in. These are pressed 
on the axles at approximately 60-tons pressure. 

Two electrolytic lightning arresters are provided in 
connection with the usual kicking coils. Type MR cir- 
cuit breakers, RG rheostats, U. S. No. 13 trolley bases 
and GE trolley poles, harps and steel-sided, copper-cen- 
tered trolley wheels complete the electrical equipment. 

The car is fitted with complete straight-air brake 
equipment consisting of a Westinghouse DIH 16-ft. air 
compressor, a 16-in. x 60-in. reservoir, a 10-in. x 12-in. 
brake cylinder and a Type E automatic slack adjuster. 
The body and truck-brake levers are so arranged as to 
give a braking pressure of 75 per cent of the load on 
the pony wheels and 85 per cent of the load on the motor 
wheels, these pressures being considered to meet the 
service conditions at New Orleans satisfactorily. Hand 
brakes arranged with double floating levers and Dayton 
ratchet-type brake handles are also installed. 

Design and Construction 

The general features of the new car's design were 
planned by a committee composed of B. F. Wood, vice- 
president and chief engineer. United Gas & Electric 
Engineering Corporation, engineers for the railway; 
L. C. Datz of the same company, J. S. Pevear, president 
New Orleans Railway & Light Company, and M. S. 
Sloan, general manager. The cars were built by the 
Southern Car Company at High Point, N. C, under the 
supervision of Bronson A. Smith, engineer for the 
United Gas & Electric Engineering Corporation. 



Northern White Cedar Association 

Twenty firms producing white-cedar lumber and 
poles were represented at the nineteenth convention of 
the Northern White Cedar Association held at Minne- 
apolis, Minn., on Jan. 26 and 27. L. A. Page, Jr., presi- 
dent of the association, stated in his official address 
that general business conditions during the last twelve 
months had worked a severe strain 'on the white-cedar 
industry, and that the stagnation produced by the Euro- 
pean war will continue to hold up business in all lines 
for some time to come. A gradual awakening of busi- 
ness is, however, in sight, but when this comes the short 
pole and post trades would be affected first. A study 
of pole stocks now on hand indicates an ample supply 
to take care of the probable demand. 

The committee on publicity, of which H. S. Gilkey is 
chairman, reported that during the year just closed 
the association has carried on a campaign to interest 
and instruct users of white cedar. The practice of 
making exhibits will be extended during the next year 
to include conventions and local fairs. The report of the 
secretary, which followed, referred to extensions of 
freight rates and exchange of credit information among 
the association members. 

The report of the committee on "war on substitutes" 
for white cedar suggested means of securing closer co- 
operation between pole producers, distributers and 
users. The importance of shipping to customers only 
first-class stock, thereby establishing a standard of ex- 
cellence for white-cedar products, was emphasized by 
several speakers. The railroad committee stated that 
the matter of increasing the allowance for stakes used 
on open cars was soon to be brought before the Inter- 
state Commerce Commission for a formal hearing. 

At the close of the convention the following officers 
were elected for 1915: President, L. A. Page, Jr., 
Minneapolis, Minn.; vice-president, H. F. Partridge, 



Minneapolis, Minn.; treasurer, H. B. Thomas, Manis- 
tique, Mich.; secretary, N. E. Boucher, 743 Lumber 
Exchange Building, Minneapolis, Minn. Directors: 
J. E. Gerich, Milwaukee, Wis.; M. J. Bell, Minneapolis, 
Minn.; William Patch, Menominee, Mich., and L. A. 
Furlong, Minneapolis, Minn. 



German 1500- Volt D.C. Line with 
Regeneration and Battery 

The Wendelstein Railway is a mountain line of Ba- 
varia only 9.3 miles long but notable as Germany's first 
1500-volt d.c. railway. Of even greater interest is the 
circumstance that regeneration was adopted in connec- 
tion with a storage battery, because the output of avail- 
able hydroelectric power alone falls below the regular 
energy requirements. 

The plant contains one 184-kw and one 330-kw Pelton 
turbo-set. The larger unit drives a 100-kw, three-phase 
machine which generates energy at 5000 volts for indus- 
trial purposes; it also drives a 200-kw machine which 
delivers 1500 volts direct current for traction. The 
smaller or reserve unit may be used as a motor in emer- 
gencies, at which time it is operated from another dis- 
tribution system to drive a second pair of three-phase 
and d.c. generators. A Pirani set is also used with the 
storage batteries to smooth out variations in voltage and 
assist in returning regenerated energy. 

The 721-cell storage battery furnished by the Ak- 
kumulatoren Fabrik A.G., Hagen, Germany, is of 100 
amp-hr. capacity and is the first in Germany to deliver 
1500 volts. This battery is divided in two parts, one 
section being on the ground floor and the remainder on 
the floor above. The lower section is grounded in the. 
negative circuit of the railway, which gives it a differ- 
ence of potential of 750 volts against ground. This vol- 
tage is easily cared for by the standard insulation of 
the accumulators. The cells of the other half, however, 
are doubly insulated against the floor, the walkways 
also have double insulation, and a stockade of wooden 
laths extends all the way around the room to prevent 
contact with the metal trim of windows and walls. 

The rolling stock comprises one locomotive and two- 
trailers, accommodating a total of 100 passengers. The 
two 750-volt motors on the locomotive are of shunt type 
to permit regeneration and are connected in series. 'The 
drive is arranged for both adhesive and rack rail trac- 
tion. Special resistances are used to absorb regenerated 
energy should connection with the overhead line be tem- 
porarily interrupted. On each motor shaft is mounted | 
a spring brake which may be manually released from | 
the motorman's cab. Air brakes are also used. A reg- ; 
ulator automatically applies the brakes and opens the i 
circuit when the desired maximum speed is exceeded. I 
Lighting is furnished at 110 volts from a motor-genera- 
tor set. 

The overhead line is carried at a height of 13 ft. to 16 
ft. 4 in., with duplicate vulcanite and porcelain insula- 
tors. The line is not carried from either the ordinary 
bracket or span construction but from a wooden imita- 
tion of bridge construction. In other words, an H is 
formed by three poles, the horizontal member of which 
is braced by a diagonal connection with each vertical 
pole. Feeder capacity is furnished by a second trolley 
wire. Although no catenary suspension is used, tension, 
take-up devices are installed every 980 ft. 

The track is of meter gage and is 9.3 miles long, 
The train starts at Brannenburg 1548 ft. above sea. 
level, and within one hour climbs to a height of 5650 ft. 
at a point only 262 ft. below the peak of the Wendel- 
stein. Despite tunnels and retaining walls it was neces- 
sary to build part of the rock rail sections on a grad 
of 23.6 per cent. 









February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



275 



The President, the Newspapers and the 

Association 

Mr. Wilson's Address Before the Mid- Year Meeting Treated by the Press as an Important PoHtical Message- 
Verbatim Report of Address with Comments from Leading Newspapers 
in Different Parts of the Country 



The Electric Railway Journal for Jan. 30 carried 
an extended report of the 1915 mid-year meeting of the 
American Electric Railway Association. However, the 
fact that the meeting was held on Friday, Jan. 29, made 
it impracticable to publish in full President Woodrow 
Wilson's address. It was therefore decided to publish 
this address verbatim in the succeeding issue of this 
paper. But the remarkably large amount of comment 
from the daily newspapers also make it worth while to 
quote in whole or in part a few of the editorials elicited 
by the President's statement of administration policy. 
The editorials received to date include newspapers as 
far west as St. Louis. However, a^ the full text of the 
address was distributed by the Associated Press there 
is every reason to believe that the same degree of pub- 
licity was secured in the Farthest West as in the Near- 
est East. 

THE PRESIDENT'S SPEECH 

"Mr. President, Ladies, and Gentlemen: It is a real 
pleasure for me to be here and to look this company in 
the face. I know how important the interests that you 
represent are. I know that they represent some of the 
chief channels through which the vigor and activity of 
the nation flow. I am also very glad, indeed, to have you 
come and look at some portion, at any rate, of the gov- 
ernment of the United States. Many things are re- 
ported and supposed about that government, and it is 
thoroughly worth your while to come and see for your- 
selves. 

"I have always maintained that the only way in which 
men could understand one another was by meeting one 
another. If I believed all that I read in the newspapers, 
I would not understand anybody. I have met many men 
whose horns dropped away the moment I was permitted 
to examine their characters. 

"For, after all, in a vast country like this the most 
difficult thing is a common understanding. We are con- 
stantly forming get-together associations, and I some- 
times think that we make the mistake of confining those 
associations in their membership to those who are inter- 
ested only in some particular group of the various indus- 
tries of the country. 

"The important thing is for the different enterprises 
of the country to understand one another, and the most 
important thing of all is for us to comprehend our life as 
a nation and understand each other as fellow-citizens. 

"It seems to me that I can say with a good deal of 
confidence that we are upon the eve of a new era of en- 
terprise and of prosperity. Enterprise has been checked 
in this country for almost twenty years, because men 
were moving among a maze of interrogation points. 
They' did not know what was going to happen to them. 
All sorts of regulation were proposed, and it was a mat- 
ter of uncertainty what sort of regulation was going 
to be adopted. 

"All sorts of charges were made against business, as 
if business were at default, when most men knew that 
the great majority of business men were honest, were 
public-spirited, were intending the right thing, and the 



many were made afraid because the few did not do what 
was right. 

Must Pull Together 

"The most necessary thing, therefore, was for us to 
agree, as we did by slow stages agree, upon the main 
particulars of what ought not to be done and then to 
put our laws in such shape as to correspond with that 
general judgment. That, I say, was a necessary pre- 
liminary, not only to a common understanding, but also 
to a universal co-operation. The great forces of a coun- 
try like this cannot pull separately; they have got to 
pull together. And, except upon a basis of common un- 
derstanding as to the law and as to the proprieties of 
conduct, it is impossible to pull together. 

"I, for one, have never doubted that all America was 
of one principle. I have never doubted that all America 
believed in doing what was fair and honorable and of 
good report. 

"But the method of control by law against the small 
minority, which was recalcitrant against these princi- 
ples, was a thing that it was difficult to determine upon. 
And it was a very great burden, let me say, to fall upon 
a particular administration of this government to have 
to undertake practically the whole business of final defi- 
nition. That is what has been attempted by the Con- 
gress now about to come to a close. It has attempted 
the definitions for which the country had been getting 
ready, or trying to get ready, for nearly half a genera- 
tion. It will require a period of test to determine 
whether they have successfully defined them or not, but 
no one needs to have it proved to him that it was neces- 
sary to define them and remove the uncertainties, and 
that, the uncertainties being removed, common under- 
standings are possible and a universal co-operation. 

What Hurts One Hurts All 

"You, gentlemen, representing these arteries of which 
I have spoken, that serve to release the forces of the 
communities and serve also to bind community with com- 
munity, are surely in a better position than the men, 
perhaps, of any other profession, to understand how 
communities constitute units — and even a nation con- 
stitutes a unit — and what is detrimental and hurtful to 
a part, you above all men, ought to know is detrimental 
to all and that you cannot demoralize some of the forces 
of a community without being in danger of demoraliz- 
ing all the forces of a community. 

"Your interest is not in the congestion of life, but in 
the release of life. Your interest is not in isolation, but 
in union — the union of parts of this great country, so 
that every energy in those parts will flow freely and with 
full force from county to county throughout the whole 
nation. 

"What I have come to speak of this afternoon is this 
unity of our interest, and I want to make some — I will 
not say 'predictions,' but to use a less dangerous, though 
bigger, word — prognostications. I understand that 
there is among the medical profession diagnosis and 
prognosis. I dare say the prognosis is more difficult 



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[Vol. XLV, No. 6 



than the diagnosis, since it has to come first, and not 
being a physician I have all the greater courage in the 
prognosis. 

"I have noticed all my life that I could speak with the 
greatest freedom about those things that I did not un- 
derstand, but there are some things that a man is bound 
to try to think out, whether he fully comprehends them 
or not. The thought of no single man can comprehend 
the life of a great nation like this, and yet men in pub- 
lic life upon whom the burden of a certain degree of 
guidance is laid must attempt to comprehend as much of 
it as they can. Their strength will be in taking counsel 
of as many informed persons as possible in each depart- 
ment with which they have to deal; but some time or 
other the point will come when they have to make a de- 
cision based upon a prognosis. 

"We have had to do that in attempting the definitions 
in law which have been attempted by this Congress, and 
now it is necessary for us, in order to go forward with 
the great spirit with which I believe we can go forward, 
to look ahead and see the things that are likely to 
happen. 

Peers Into the Future 

"In the first place, I feel that the mists and miasmic 
airs of suspicion that have filled the business world have 
now been blown away. I believe that we have passed the 
era of suspicion and have come now into the era of con- 
fidence. Knowing the elements we have to deal with, 
we can deal with them; and with that confidence of 
knowledge we can have confidence of enterprise. 

"And that enterprise is going to mean this : Nobody 
is henceforth going to be afraid of or suspicious of any 
business merely because it is big. If my judgment is 
correct nobody has been suspicious of any business 
merely because it was big, but they have been suspicious 
whenever they thought that the bigness was being used 
to take an unfair advantage. 

"We shall have to admit that it is easier for a big 
fellow to take advantage of you than for a little fellow 
to take advantage of you; therefore, we instinctively 
watch the big fellow with a little closer scrutiny than 
we watch the little fellow. But bond having been given 
for the big fellow, we can sleep o'nights. Bond having 
been given that he will keep the peace, we do not have 
to spend our time and waste our energy watching him. 

"The conditions of confidence being established, no- 
body need think that if he is taller than the rest any- 
body is going to throw a stone at him simply because 
he is a favorable target — always provided there is fair 
dealing and real service. 

"Because the characteristic of modern business, gen- 
tlemen, is this : The number of cases in which men do 
business on their own individual, private capital is rela- 
tively small in our day. Almost all the greater enter- 
prises are done on what is, so far as the managers of 
that business are concerned, other people's money. That 
is what a joint-stock company means. It means, 'Won't 
you lend us your resources to conduct this business and 
trust us, a little group of managers, to see that you get 
honest and proper returns for your money?' And no 
man who manages a joint-stock company can know for 
many days together, without fresh inquiry, who his 
partners are, because the stock is constantly changing 
hands and the partners are seldom the same people for 
long periods together, which amounts to saying that, 
inasmuch as you are using the money of everybody who 
chooses to come in, your responsibility is to everybody 
who has come in or who may come in. 

"That is simply another way of saying that your busi- 
ness is a public business, and you owe it to the public to 
take them into your confidence in regard to the way in 
which it is conducted. The era of private business in 



the sense of business conducted with the money of the 
partners — I mean of the managing partners — is prac- 
tically passed, not only in this country but almost every- 
where. Therefore, almost all business has this direct 
responsibility to the public in general. We owe a con- 
stant report to the public whose money we are con- 
stantly asking for in order to conduct the business itself. 
Therefore, we have got to trade not only on our effi- 
ciency, not only on the service that we render, but on 
the confidence that we cultivate. 

A New Atmosphere for Business 

"There is a new atmosphere for business. The oxy- 
gen that the lungs of modern business takes in is the 
oxygen of the public confidence, and if you have not got 
that your business is essentially paralyzed and asphyxi- 
ated. 

"I take it that we are in a position now to come to a 
common understanding, knowing that only a common 
understanding will be the stable basis of business, and 
that what we want for business hereafter is the same 
kind of liberty that we want for the individual. The 
liberty of the individual is limited with the greatest 
sharpness where his actions come into collision with the 
interests of the comniunity he lives in. 

"My liberty consists in a sort of parole. Society says 
to me. 'You may do what you please until you do some- 
thing that is in violation of the common understanding 
of the public interest ; then your parole is forfeited. We 
will take you into custody. We will limit your activ- 
ities. We will penalize you if you use this thing that 
you call your liberty against our interest.' 

"Business does not want, and ought not to ask for, 
more liberty than the individual has ; and I have always 
summed up for myself individual liberty and business 
liberty and every other kind of liberty in the phrase 
that is common in the sporting world — 'a free field and 
no favor.' 

"There have been times — I will not specify them, but 
there have been times — when the field looked free, but 
when there were favors received from the managers of 
the course, when there were advantages given, inside 
tracks accorded, practices which block the other runner, 
rules which would exclude the amateur who wanted to 
get in. That may be a free field, but there is favor, 
there is partiality, there is preference, there is covert 
advantage taken of somebody, and while it looks very 
well from the grandstand, there are men whom 
you can find who were not allowed to get into the 
track and test their powers against the other men who 
were racing for the honors of the day. 

What New Liberty Means 

"I think it is a serviceable figure. It means this, that 
you are not going to be barred from the contest because 
you are big and strong and you are not going to be pen- 
alized because you are big and strong, but you are going 
to be made to observe the rules of the track, and not get 
in anybody's way except as you can keep out of his way 
by having more vigor and skill than he has. 

"When we get that understanding, that we are all 
sports and that we are not going to ask for, not only, 
but we are not going to condescend to take advantage of 
anything that does not belong to us, why then the atmos- 
phere will clear so that it will seem as if the sun had 
never shone as it does that day. It is the spirit of true 
sportsmanship that ought to get into everything, and 
men who when they get beaten that way squeal do not 
deserve our pity. 

"Some men are going to get beaten because they have 
not the brains; they have not the initiative, they have 
not the skill, they have not the knowledge ; they have not 
the same capacity that other men have. They will have 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



277 



to be employees ; they will have to be used where they 
can be used. 

"We do not need to conceal from ourselves that there 
are varieties of capacity in the world. Some men have 
heads, but they are not particularly furnished. I over- 
heard two men one day talking about a third man, and 
one of them referred to his head. 'Head?' the other 
said, 'head? That isn't a head; that's just a knot. The 
Almighty put that there to keep him from raveling out.' 

"And we have to admit that there are such persons. 
Now, liberty does not consist in framing laws to put 
such men at the front and say they have got to be 
allowed to keep pace with the rest, because that would 
hold the whole process of civilization back. But it does 
consist in saying no matter how featherweight the other 
man is you must not arbitrarily interfere with him; 
that there must be an absolutely free field and no favor 
to anybody. 

The Rules of the Game 

"There are, therefore, I suppose, certain rules of the 
game. I will mention what seem to me some of them. 
I have already mentioned one of them by way of illus- 
tration. First of all is the rule of publicity, not doing 
anything under cover, letting the public know what you 
are doing and judge of it according as it is. There are 
a great many businesses in this country that have fallen 
under suspicion because they were so secretive, when 
there was nothing to secrete that was dishonorable. 

"The minute I keep everything in my pocket and will 
not show anybody what is there, they conjecture what 
may be in my pocket; whereas, if I turn my pockets in- 
side out, the conjecture is, at any rate, dissipated. There 
is no use inviting suspicion by secretiveness. If a busi- 
ness is being honorably done and successfully done, you 
ought to be pleased to turn it inside out and let the 
people whom you are inviting to invest in it see exactly 
how it is done and with what results. 

"Publicity, which is required in sport, is required in 
business. Let us see how you are running the game. 

"Then in the second place, there is a full equivalent 
for money you receive. The full equivalent in service, 
not trying to skimp in the service in order to increase 
profits above a reasonable return, but trying to make 
the profits proportioned to the satisfaction of the people 
that you serve. There isn't any more solid foundation 
for business than that. 

"If you thoroughly satisfy the people you are serving 
you are welcome to their money. They are not going 
to grudge it because they will feel that they are getting 
a quid pro quo — they are getting something such as was 
promised them when their money was asked of them. 

Need op Conscience 

"Then, in the third place, this game requires some- 
thing more than ordinary sports. It requires a certain 
kind of conscience in business, a certain feeling that we 
are, after all, in this world because we are expected to 
make good according to the standards of the people we 
live with. That, after all, gentlemen, is .the chief com- 
pulsion that is laid on all of us. 

"I am not aware of being afraid of jail. I do not feel 
uneasy when I pass a penitentiary, but I would feel 
extremely uneasy if I knew I had done something which 
some fine, honorable friend of mine would condemn if 
I passed before him. I would look carefully at his eyes 
to see if he suspected anything, and I would feel un- 
happy until I had made a clean breast of it with him. 
That is what we are afraid of, and that is what we 
ought to be afraid of. 

"We are sustained by the moral judgment of hon- 
orable men, and there isn't anything else in this world 



that I know of that is worth while. How honors must 
hurt a man if he feels that they have been achieved dis- 
honorably. They then are an arrow in his heart, not a 
quickening or tonic to his spirit in any respect. If he 
feels that he has cheated the people that trusted him 
then no matter what fortune he piles up, they never 
can contribute to his peace of mind for a moment. So I 
say that the conscience in business is the motive spring 
of the whole thing; the pride of doing the thing as it 
ought to be done. 

"I ask every man in this room who employs other men 
if he would not pay the best salary he has if he could be 
assured that the man he employed was of that quality? 
You know that is the sort of men you want — the men 
who will take a pride in doing the thing right and have 
a clean conscience toward you who employ them. Now 
all of us are employees of the public. It doesn't make 
any difference what our business is or how small it is, 
we are, so far as we get money for it, employees of the 
public, and our clear, clean consciences toward our em- 
ployers are the basis of our success, and it goes with- 
out saying, the basis of our happiness. 

The Spirit of Service 

"Then, the fourth rule, as it seems to me, is the rule 
of having the spirit of service. I know a lot of cant is 
talked about that, and I get very sick of the cant, as I 
dare say you do, but when I talk about the spirit of 
service I an not meaning a sentiment. I am not mean- 
ing a state of mind; I am meaning something very con- 
crete — that you want to see to it that the thing that 
you do for the public and get money for is the best thing 
of that kind that can be done. That is what I mean by 
the spirit of service. 

"I have known many a man who gave up profit for 
mental satisfaction. I know men in this city — there are 
men in the scientific bureaus of this government whom 
I could cite — who could make very big salaries, but who 
prefer the satisfaction of doing things that will serve 
the whole community, and doing them just as well as 
they possibly can be done. 

"I for one am proud of the scientific bureaus of this 
government. There are men in it of the most self- 
sacrificing spirit and of the highest scientific efficiency 
who do things on a petty salary which some other men 
would not do at all, because if you have to pay a man 
a salary to produce the best product of his brain, then 
he scales the product down to the salary. Here are men 
who scale the product up to the highest standards of 
scientific ideals. 

"They have hitched their wagons to a star, and the 
star is about to lift their names above the names of the 
rest of us. So I say that if your earning capacity is 
the capacity to earn the public confidence, you can go 
about your business like free men. Nobody is going to 
molest you and everybody is going to say, 'If you earn 
big profits; if you have treated the people from whom 
you are making your profits as they ought to be treated ; 
if you treat the employees whom you use in earning 
those profits as they ought to be treated ; if your methods 
of competition are clear and above reproach ; why, then, 
you can pile these profits as high as the Rockies and 
nobody will be jealous of it.' Because you will have 
earned them in a sense that is the handsomest sense 
of all. 

Definition of Government 

"It is in this spirit that we all ought to regard the 
laws, that we all ought to criticise the laws, and that all 
ought to co-operate in the enforcement of the laws. 
Government, gentlemen, is merely an attempt to express 
the conscience of everybody, the average conscience of 



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[Vol. XLV, No. 6 



the nation, in the rules that everybody is commanded 
to obey. That is all they are. 

"If the government is going faster than the public 
conscience, it will presently have to pull up ; if it is not 
going as fast as the public conscience, it w^ill presently 
have to be whipped up. Because the public conscience 
is going to say, 'We want our laws to express our char- 
acter,' and our character must have this kind of solid- 
ity underneath it, the moral judgment of right and 
wrong. 

"The only reason we quarrel with reformers some- 
times is because they are, or suppose they are, a little 
more enlightened than the rest of us, and they want us 
all of a sudden to be just as enlightened as they are, and 
we cannot stand the pace. That is all that makes us 
uneasy about reformers. If we could get our second 
wind, if we could keep up the pace as long as they do, 
we might be able to run as fast as they do, but we are 
more heavily weighted with clay than they are. We 
cannot go as fast. And we like companionship. We 
want to wait for the rest of them. We do not want to 
be in a lonely advance climbing some heights of perfec- 
tion where there is no good inn at which to stop over- 
night. 

"Put Up, or Shut Up" 

"That, gentlemen, is the homely and, I dare say, 
obvious lesson which I have meant to give utterance to 
this afternoon. I think that I understand what you 
are after. I hope that you understand what we are 
after. All I ask is that if anything is being done that 
ought not to be done, the fault in it be conclusively 
pointed out and the way to correct the mistake be ex- 
plicitly shown. There is an old rule that ought to obtain 
in politics as in everything else and it is aptly ex- 
pressed in a very homely way. It is the old rule of 'put 
up or shut up.' 

"Some one said, 'If you wish me to consider you witty 
I must really trouble you to make a joke.' If you wish 
me to consider you wise I must really trouble you to 
show the goods: To show how the thing can be done; 
to show how it can be better done. Because nobody is 
fool enough to suppose that the way he has determined 
that the thing ought to be done is necessarily the best 
way to do it; but it is the best way to do it until you 
show a better way. That is a perfectly obvious rule. 
So again I say it is the rule of 'put up or shut up.' And 
I do not mean that in any sort of disrespect. 

"The market for ideas is a highly competitive market 
and the rules of competition are necessarily fair. There 
is only one test for an idea and that is 'Is it good?' 
You may for the time being dress it with such rhetoric 
that it will look good and the best thing that is charac- 
teristic of countries like our own is that every man who 
has an idea is constantly invited to the platform. And 
there is nothing better for an idea by way of test than 
exposure to the atmosphere. If you let enough people 
hear it stated often enough it will certainly seek its 
proper level. 

"That is the reason I believe in free speech. I have 
been subjected to free speech myself and it is hard to 
endure sometimes, because the office of the President 
seems to be the clearing house for original ideas. I am 
brought more original ideas per diem, I dare say, than 
any other person in the country, and, therefore, pay the 
penalty of freedom of speech. 

"Perhaps my mind does not register original ideas 
readily enough, because some of them do not register at 
all. I am perfectly willing to admit that that is the 
fault of the register, not the fault of the idea. All I 
have to say is that if you have ideas, the register is en- 
tirely at your service." 



Comments of the Press 



Many Shades of Assent and Dissent Apparent in the 
Editorial Expressions of Leading Newspapers 

The following paragraphs are extracts from the news- 
paper editorials on President Wilson's speech before the 
American Electric Railway Association from New York 
papers or forwarded by staff correspondents in time for 
use in this issue. 

Philadelphia Ledger, Jan. 30— President Wilson's ad- 
dress to the members of the American Electric Railway 
Association in Washington is a reflection of one phase 
of his personality with which the American public have 
not heretofore had many opportunities to become famil- 
iar. He spoke as a man among men, and he employed 
the language and the similes of sport to emphasize his 
thought. In elfect, the President told his hearers, and 
through them the business world, that it was up to them 
to play the game and play it fairly; that the process of 
restraint and regulation, to the formulation of which the 
congress has laboriously devoted itself, has come to an 
end; that the recent laws have furnished definitions 
of business ethics which represent the desire of the 
country, and that it is now up to business men to test 
those definitions fairly and to enter upon the era of 
prosperity which we are facing with new confidence and 
with an honest purpose to enter upon "a free field and 
no favor." With the spirit of the President's remarks 
there will be general agreement, but whether there has 
been that specific definition by law of what ought to be 
done and what ought not to be done in big business is a 
trifle doubtful. That a great deal of constructive work 
has been done no one will deny; the tariff has been re- 
vised, the banking system reorganized and new machin- 
ery created, and a trades commission provided for. But 
beyond the definition of "restraint of trade" already 
given by the courts it cannot be said that the new laws 
add anything on that point, while the trades commission 
is yet to begin its activities. It is some comfort to 
know that business is not going to be molested solely 
because it may make big profits. 

New York Times Annalist, Feb. 1 — The responsibilit.v 
of the managers of a great corporation is to the public 
at large rather than to the group of individuals who at 
any given time constitute the body of its stockholders. 
That is true even of corporations which perform no 
quasi-public function. . . . The placing of the stock 
of a corporation upon a public market through listing 
it on the Stock Exchange or otherwise is in effect an 
invitation to the public at large to become stockholders. 
It thus becomes the duty of the corporation to inform 
regarding its affairs not only the public which has 
bought, but likewise the public which has not yet bought, 
but which may. 

New York Times, Jan. 31 — In his speech to the Amer- 
ican Electric Railway Association the President told his 
audience that: ". . . nobody is henceforth going 
to be afraid or suspicious of any business merely 
because it is big." It has not been so during the last 
twenty years, particularly during the last ten years. 
Bigness has been a crime, the only crime proved, and 
the persistent attempts to punish it savagely have dis- 
turbed the industrial peace of the country, with dis- 
astrous results, in so much that the accruing loss may 
be fairly compared with the cost of a great war. A few 
months ago the President discovered that there was a 
new temper of the people. The new temper meant that 
the people had got tired of seeing corporations crucified 
every day, that they had found out that these endless 
prosecutions were really directed against themselves, 
that the hurt was theirs, that when business was 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



279 



alarmed and capital made timid they, all the people, 
were the chief sufferers. It was not a new temper at 
all, it was a very old state of mind. Now the President 
calls it a new atmosphere. It is the same thing by an- 
other name. If it means anything at all, it means that 
the politicians have discovered that harassing the cor- 
porations is not a profitable business for them. 

New York Sun, Jan. 31 — -In his speech to the Amer- 
ican Electric Railway Association at Washington Presi- 
dent Wilson said : "It seems to me that I can say with a 
good deal of confidence that we are upon the eve of a 
new era of enterprise and of prosperity. " The President 
has been saying this for more than a year. Indeed, he 
has gone much further; he said that the era of pros- 
perity had arrived and that the blindness to it was 
purely psychological. Apparently he was mistaken in 
his former utterances. The President holds that the 
present regime at Washington has resolved the doubts 
and removed the checks. It has discovered and for- 
mulated the "rules of the business game" which appear 
to be excellent examples of Delphic wisdom. It has 
given to business a liberty which "consists in a sort of 
parole." If business can understand the rules and apply 
them with exactly the same minds as the government 
monitors, it is as free as a babe in leading strings. It 
is its duty and its privilege to grow under the new 
tutelage, which is the new freedom. The paternal ad- 
ministration is determined to regulate it into the proph- 
esied prosperity. Mr. Wilson ends by imposing in 
homely phrase a motto upon business, "Put up or shut 
up." Perhaps business may be inspired to make it 
reciprocal. 

New York World, Jan. 30 — The true American atti- 
tude toward business was admirably defined by Presi- 
dent Wilson in a single paragraph of his speech to the 
American Electric Railway Association: "You are not 
going to be barred from the contest because you are big 
and strong, and you are not going to be penalized be- 
cause you are big and strong, but you are going to ob- 
serve the rules of the track and not get in anybody's 
way, except as you can keep out of his way by having 
more vigor and skill than he has." This is the sum and 
substance of the Sherman anti-trust law and of the 
Clayton amendment. Every business man who has any 
conscience at all knows whether or not he is following 
the rules of the game. So far as business is concerned 
the period of uncertainty is over, as the President has 
said. The rules of the game have been defined, and 
these rules are an expression of the general public con- 
science. For years the managers of big business have' 
insisted that they could adapt themselves to any condi- 
tions if they only knew what those conditions were. 
This was a just complaint, but it has been met. There 
is no manager of a great industry in the country who 
does not know in a general way what is expected of him, 
or who does not know that nothing unjust or unrea- 
sonable is expected of him. 

Indianapolis Star, Feb. 1 — Business has been pilled 

and potioned, inspected and dissected, expurgated and 

, objurgated, fietcherized and exorcised, drawn and quar- 

( tered — literally quartered. Now it is lectured. Like an 

) incorrigibly naughty boy it is led by the ear to a front 

seat where, fidgety and forlorn, it must await the pri- 

i vacy of after-school hours when teacher will inflict a 

i personally conducted course in deportment. For the 

! precepts business must pretend to be thankful and duly 

I exalted. It must receive them with submissive head and 

not a sign that it has done better by the President's 

code of morals than he has himself. He exalts the virtue 

of publicity for business, but business dare not make 

reply that while it has never sought other than publicity. 



a Democratic national administration has made secrecy 
its rule of conduct in caucuses, in legislation, in the 
violation of civil service, in Mexico, in foreign affairs 
and everywhere. No historian, not even Woodrow Wil- 
son, records a more striking absence of publicity in 
government than has existed at Washington since 
March 4, 1913. 

Indianapolis News, Jan. 30 — In his address before the 
American Electric Railway Association the President 
spoke of what had been done by Congress to clear the 
business situation, and undoubtedly progress has been 
made. The trouble had, he thought, been due to the 
fact that men for the last twenty years had been "mov- 
ing amongst a maze of interrogation points." They 
have not, however, as yet got wholly out of the maze, 
though we believe they are making progress. One in- 
terrogation point it is within the power of the President 
to sweep from the path, and that is an extra session of 
Congress. That is something which business and the 
people generally do not want. . . . The temper 
of the speech is excellent, and there is much in it that 
can be heartily commended. 

St. Louis Globe-Democrat, Jan. 31- — Many portions of 
President Wilson's speech to the convention of the 
American Electric Railway Association are subject to 
criticism, but his statement that he has met many men 
whose horns dropped away the moment he was permitted 
to examine their character is filled with truth. Most of 
the prejudices of the world are based on misunderstand- 
ing. Knowledge is the greatest dehorner extant. If our 
people might meet each other oftener in friendly inter- 
course there would be a better mutual understanding. 
Railway travel and our mail service have done much to 
remove sectional prejudices. The meeting of our repre- 
sentatives in Congress has had the same effect. The 
country has often marveled at how the fiery utterances 
of Senators have been tempered by a brief association 
with the men whom they once held up to obloquy and 
shame. 

Buffalo News, Jan. 30 — In his speech yesterday before 
the American Electric Railway Association the Presi- 
dent said that henceforth nobody is going to be sus- 
picious of any business just because it is big. It is 
evident that the President has moved a long way since 
he came into office, whether his party has done so or not, 
because the chief aim in life of the party in power for 
the last two years has seemed to be the prodding of big 
business. 

Louisville Evening Post, Jan. 30 — President Wilson 
yesterday, in a public address, said, among other in- 
teresting things, "that since practically all business 
concerns were no longer private but were owned by a 
number of people, there should be full publicity about 
their affairs." We do not know where this theory of 
universal inquisition into the affairs of other people 
arose, but whatever its source, it is indefensible, and 
utterly mischievous. The only businesses which have 
not this right of privacy are, first, governmental busi- 
ness, which nevertheless is largely conducted in secret 
by secret devices, full knowledge being kept from the 
owners of the business ; second, the business of common 
carriers of passengers, freight and intelligence, which 
business is public business, conducted by corporations 
which are accepted as substitutes for governmental 
agencies and are given place on governmental highways, 
with other governmental powers and privileges ; third, 
public utilities in cities, which are also arms of the 
government; fourth, banking, insurance and related in- 
terests, requiring some form of a government guar- 
antee, based on governmental inspection. 



280 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 6 



Address of C. Loomis Allen at Mid -Year 
Dinner 



Spirit of Full and Frank Publicity Becoming Universal — 
New Committee on Public Relations 

The toastmaster at the dinner of the American Elec- 
tric Kailway Association and the American Electric 
Railway Manufacturers' Association was C. Loomis 
Allen, president of the parent organization. As Mr. 
Allen's remarks were somewhat broader than those 
usually given by a toastmaster it has been deemed of 
interest to print in this issue the more significant pas- 
sages of his opening statement, as follows : 

The meeting of to-day and this dinner of to-night are, 
I am firmly convinced, typical of the present state of 
mind of our association, and a bright augury of future 
prospects. They have their keynote in a frankness 
which is a reflection of Article X in the code of prin- 
ciples adopted by your association at Atlantic City in 
October, 1914. 

If the association, in behalf of the industry, is to 
achieve the results at which it aims, the beliefs ex- 
pressed in this article cannot be too often emphasized. 
I call it to your particular attention again to-night be- 
cause I believe that of all the declarations which the 
code contains it is the most important, as directly re- 
flecting the spirit in which we must proceed in order to 
secure that which is vitally necessary, if public utilities 
are to continue in their present form. 

"Full and frank publicity should be the policy of all 
transportation companies, to the end that proper in- 
formation may be available to the investor and the 
public." So the article reads. 

It will be remembered that although submitted in 
advance to the member companies for their criticism 
and emendation, the code of principles was adopted by 
the convention without a dissenting voice. We can, 
therefore, safely assume that the full meaning of the 
several planks was realized by those companies who 
subscribed by their assent to its far-reaching declara- 
tions. Article X means, in consequence, that the elec- 
tric railways of the country, as represented in this 
association, are prepared to submit with the greatest 
frankness their affairs to the scrutiny of patrons. 

If in the past there was reason for the policy of 
secrecy which seemed to envelop corporation matters, 
that reason has disappeared. Our cards are thrown 
face upward upon the table, and in the spirit of co- 
operation and mutual helpfulness we appeal to the 
people of the communities which we serve in the firm 
belief that the reason and the justice of our plea will 
lead to that co-operation which ultimately will give a 
solution of the problems which have confronted this 
industry during the last decade. 

Publicity, gentlemen, is not a new thing to the elec- 
tric railway industry. For years we have had pub- 
licity thrust upon us unsought. Our sins have been 
magnified by the lenses of demagogy. Our good deeds 
have been hid in the shadows cast by the searchlight of 
the muckraker. No public service company ever has or 
ever can escape publicity. It is for this association 
and the industry to say, however, what shall be its 
character. Shall it be the publicity which comes from 
ex parte investigations inspired by the self-exploiter, 
seeking political advancement at the expense of our in- 
terests? By the fantasies of the half-baked theorist? 
By the malicious activities of those whose delight it is to 
attack all prosperity? Or shall it be the publicity that 
comes from our belief that of all tribunals, the tribunal 
of a public properly informed, and with a full knowledge 
of all facts, is in the end the fairest of all? 

Business ethics, like all things else in this world, are 



subject to evolution. The structure of business in th( 
United States to-day is vastly different from that whicb 
existed in the days of our fathers. Economic develop- 
ment has been rapid. The individualism which was re 
sponsible in the first instance for the development ol 
our resources is, to a large extent, disappearing and i 
spirit of co-operation in all lines is taking its place. 

The $150,000,000 invested in the traction business ir 
1882 has increased to $4,500,000,000. The 35,000 em- 
ployees of that year have multiplied until to-day thert 
are more than 300,000, and the 3000 miles of track have 
expanded until now nearly 41,000 miles of track cover 
city and country. Not one force at work in this country 
since 1888, when in the near-by city of Richmond tht 
first complete electric city system was inaugurated, has 
contributed so much to the prosperity and growth of 
the cities of the United States as has the electric rail- 
vv'ay. It has bound together the town and country. It 
has done away with the necessity of congestion in oui 
large urban communities. It is conserving health, and 
it has brought prosperity in its wake. 

It would indeed be surprising if in the course of this 
development, if during these full years, when the 
genius of the inventor, the energy of the executive and 
the vision of the promoter were all feverishly at wori 
in the creation of the magnificent system of local trans- 
portation which exists to-day throughout the country, 
errors had not occurred, if indeed sins of omission and 
commission were not an accompaniment, if perfection 
in method or in practice had been arrived at. 

For one I am ready to admit the errors; I am even 
ready to admit in some degree the sins; and I make no 
claim for perfection. I do say, however, that the de- 
velopment of the electric railway industry has been 
accomplished with no greater degree of error, with nc 
greater taint of sin, than the development of any of the 
other marvelous industries which have made the United 
States what it is to-day. 

I maintain that the good which the industry has done 
so far overbalances the evils, that we, as its representa- 
tives, may appear before the people of this countrj 
with our heads erect and with no apology in our speed 
and ask of the public fair treatment, to the end thai 
the development so splendidly begun shall be carried t( 
its full conclusion, and the people of our urban anc 
rural United States receive the best possible service a1, 
the least possible cost. 

Under our theory of government it is in the end thei 

people who must decide. In some form or other our cast 

.will go to the public for a final decision. It is for us 

the organized representatives of this industry, to sax 

in what form that shall be. 

On Monday night Jan. 25 your committee on public 
relations, consisting of representatives from members 
of your Manufacturers' Association and your Railway 
Association, held a meeting in New York, at which tht, 
machinery for reaching the people with our case wafi 
assembled. Three sub-committees were appointed t(i 
have charge of various channels by which the source: 
of public information can be kept in touch with ouf 
ideas and our ideals. This is but a beginning, but ii 
is a start in the right direction. ! 

With your assistance and with your co-operation 
this committee and its subdivisions can give to the elec 
trie railways that which they have for so long looked 
and which is so necessary for their welfare, a voice 
We have been inarticulate too long. It is time that wi 
had our day in that court of public opinion the atten 
tion of which has been far too long monopolized by ou: 
enemies. With your assistance we will have it, and ' 
bespeak in behalf of Mr. McCarter and confreres on th 
committee of public relations, your whole-hearted co 
operation and help. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



281 



The Brady Medal Award 

I'xlow Is Given an Abstract of Parts of the Report of the Committee on Award Outlining Safety Methods of the 
Companies Honored — Awards Will be Officially Made in New York on Feb. 10 



In last week's issue a brief note regarding the award 
< I the Anthony N. Brady medals was printed, with a 
statement of the fact that copies of the report of the 
award committee were distributed. Below are given 
s(i;ne extracts from the report. Information regarding 
tlK> individuals honored in the award, including details 
of their work in the safety movement, together with 
their portraits, appear elsewhere in this issue. Mr. 
Sears was a pioneer in safety work and originated much 
of the activity described below. His campaigns to re- 
duce infant accidents and drunkenness and other nuis- 
ances on cars have been effective. His expert knowledge 
of workmen's compensation acts in general has enabled 
him to administer the Massachusetts act with extreme 
fairness and justice. Mr. Neal has been active on the 
shop committees, combining enthusiasm with ripe ex- 
perience. He has compiled many instructive briefs, re- 
garding the treatment of common ailments, which are 
discussed at safety meetings. At present he investi- 
gates all accidents which occur at the Albany .Street 
shops of the Boston Elevated Railway. He was for two 
years chairman of the shop safety committee. 

The medals will be officially awarded at the annual 
meeting of the American Museum of Safety, which oc- 
curs on Feb. 10 at the United Engineering Societies' 
Building in New York. 

Some Facts Regarding the Boston Elevated Rail- 
way System 

The Boston Elevated Railway controls and operates 
practically all of the passenger transportation lines 
in the city of Boston and the surrounding cities of 
Cambridge, Everett, Maiden, Medford, Somerville and 
the towns of Belmont, Watertown, Brookline and Arl- 
ington, and also operates to a more limited extent in 
the cities of Chelsea and Newton. The municipal area 
of Boston contains a population of about 700,000, but its 
true transportation area is made up of a number of 
separate municipal units containing together in excess 
of 1,200,000 population. The business district of the 
city is comprised within a very narrow area, through 
some part of which practically all of the 1600 cars and 
the 150,000 daily trips made by these cars pass. The 
narrowest and most involved streets of the city are 
within the same area. The longest stretch of straight 
track in the congested district is 1050 feet, and this is 
on Washington Street, the principal and most con- 
gested street in the city, the width of this street from 
curb to curb in the widest part being but 31 ft. 

Applicants for employment on the rapid transit lines 
are limited to the positions of gatemen, brakemen on 
these lines obtaining their positions only after having 
worked as gatemen, guards only after having worked 
as brakemen, and motormen only after they have served 
in all three of the lesser positions. As a result it takes 
about seven years of service to become a motorman on 
the rapid transit line. The company is also consider- 
ing a plan to require physical examination of applicants 
for positions in the maintenance department. Pros- 
pective trainmen are instructed in a special school and 
later are under the direction of an instructor while in 
car service. In connection with the matter of ex- 
amination of prospective employees the company co- 
operated with Prof. Hugo Miinsterberg, head of the de- 
partment of psychology at Harvard University, in mak- 
ing psychological tests upon trainmen, designed to yield 



data of use in accident prevention. Every year all 
motormen and conductors on the surface lines and all 
motormen, guards and brakemen on the rapid transit 
lines are required to pass an eyesight test. 

During the past year strenuous effort has been made 
to increase the supervision of car men by inspectors. 
As the result of the practice of keeping detailed reports 
of all cases in which inspectors have called matters to 
the attention of car man or superintendent, there has 
been an increase of over 100 per cent in the number 
of reports made in a year. The records of a certain 
number of employees are reviewed every week, so that 
the record of every employee in the service is carefully 
scrutinized at least once in six months. In the effort 
to impress upon employees the effects of the infraction 
of rules the legal department maintains a corps of 
accident clerks. Their duty is to observe the conditions 
which are conducive to accidents and to point out the 
ways in which accidents can be averted. Accident 
charts posted in the carhouses and revised daily have 
been found useful. Letters regarding the safety 
problem have also been mailed to the men at their 
homes and these have been appreciated. 

The company not only makes total abstinence from 
the use of intoxicating liquors a condition of employ- 
ment, but enforces strictly its rule making intoxication 
in uniform a reason for discharge, and in many cases 
has even discharged men who have become intoxicated 
when not in uniform and off duty. 

During the year ending June 30, 1914, the company 
has succeeded in reducing the number of blue-uni- 
formed men leaving the service from 2362 to 1166 or 50.5 
per cent as compared with the year ending March 31, 
1912, this being the most recent one for which the 
figures for comparison were obtainable, and has re- 
duced the number of blue-uniformed men entering the 
service from 2380 to 1145, or 52 per cent. 

The company has conducted a campaign for the pre- 
vention of accidents to school children, which was 
begun in the fall of 1909. In October, 1913, a circular 
was prepared with the title, "Safety Work with School 
Children," which has had a very wide circulation. In 
June, 1914, the Boston Chamber of Commerce was in- 
duced to give its sanction and name to a general "safety 
first" campaign. The first step of this consisted of an 
active and strenuous circularizing of the schools in 
metropolitan Boston during the last two weeks before 
vacation. About 200,000 bulletins over the signature 
of the Boston Chamber of Commerce, calling attention 
of fathers and mothers to the seriousness of accidents 
and inviting their co-operation, were distributed. 
About 7000 special circulars were sent to the teachers 
of the schools containing outlines of talks to be given 
by them to the children before the summer vacation. 
In this movement the school oflScials and teachers co- 
operated heartily. 

In the campaign the police and the fire commission- 
ers, the Amalgamated Association of Street and Elec- 
tric Railway Employees of America, the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad and the employees of 
the company, all co-operated with the Chamber of 
Commerce. 

For the month of July, 1914, in which special account 
was. kept, there was a total reduction of 25.3 per cent 
in the number of accidents reported as compared with 
July, 1913, and this in spit^ of an increase of 9.9 per 



282 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 6 



cent in the number of passengers carried and an in- 
crease of 6.8 per cent in the number of trips run. 

Safety committees were instituted throughout the 
entire system on July 1, 1913, the total number of local 
committees being thirty-seven. These committees 
represent all grades of work in the company's service, 
every division of the operating bureau being repre- 
sented by one or more. The work centers in a general 
safety committee, composed of executive officers and 
heads of departments, whose duty it is to take final 
action upon all recommendations which have not been 
approved by the head of the bureau. A general secre- 
tary, appointed by the general safety committee, de- 
votes his entire time to attending meetings of local com- 
mittees, making records of suggestions and following 
the course of suggestions until they are either adopted 
or rejected. During the first year 371 men served on 
the various safety committees and 532 suggestions 
were received. 

Some Facts Regarding the Public Service Railway 
AND Railroad Systems of New Jersey 

The Public Service Railway and Public Service Rail- 
road operate over practically the entire State of New 
Jersey, and serve twenty-one cities and 119 towns and 
municipalities with a population, according to the 1910 
census, of 1,898,559. The greater part of the system is 
purely urban, but some of the lines operate in rural 
districts. 

Employees are trained in a school of instruction, 
after passing the physical examination, and are there 
thoroughly prepared for their future responsibilities. 
After a day in the school, where they are drilled on 
instruction cars and instructed in the rules, those who 
pass the required examinations are put on the road 
under competent men and receive training under actual 
road conditions. After a period of from seven to ten 
days they are recalled to the school and again examined 
before being placed in charge of their cars. For any 
infractions of the rules after being placed on a car 
employees are sent back to the school on their own 
time to be drilled on those rules which have been in- 
fringed. One instructor, specially qualified, drills all 
students in accident prevention and the method of pro- 
cedure after an accident has occurred. Lectures, illus- 
trated with lantern slides and moving pictures, are de- 
livered to all conductors, motormen and inspectors at 
all of the carhouses twice during the year. 

During the past year a committee on safety, consist- 
ing of the heads of the various departments, with the 
general claim agent as chairman, was organized. This 
committee meets monthly and is open to suggestions 
from all employees regarding conditions of roadway, 
equipment and operation from a safety standpoint. 

For the past three and a half years a welfare plan for 
the payment of insurance, sick benefits and pensions to 
employees, their relatives and dependents, has been in 
operation. The employees receive these benefits without 
cost. The work, upon which the company expended 
nearly $54,000 last year, is under the direction of a wel- 
fare department. 

In alleviating the effect of accidents first aid is ap- 
plied to all injured persons, and during the past year 
the services of more than fifty physicians, regularly en- 
gaged for the work, were at the command of those 
needing emergency treatment. All power houses, shops, 
substations, line wagons, etc., are equipped with first- 
aid cabinets, and in each carhouse and substation hangs 
a chart illustrating the Schaefer or prone-pressure 
method of manual resuscitation, and each employee is 
required to familiarize himself with it. Employees are 
also trained by a practical man, who spends much of his 
time in going from place to place giving lectures and 
illustrating manual resuscitation. 



On Jan. 1, 1914, a filing system was installed in the 
claim department by which every accident is indexed 
under six headings, as follows: Car number, con- 
ductor's number and name, motorman's number and 
name, car line and carhouse, nature of accident and ! 
place of accident. By means of this system the company 
is enabled quickly to note repetitions of any kind of acci- 
dent and to notify the heads of departments immediately 
so that further repetition may be prevented. 

As part of the educational equipment special reels 
of safety films have been made in co-operation with 
the Edison Company, and these are now being exhibited 
throughout the country. The campaign has also been 
extended to include wagon owners and drivers, who 
have been reached by visits, lectures and the distribu- 
tion of large safety posters. 

In conclusion it may be noted that, during the past 
eight years, the percentage of expenditure for accidents 
in comparison with gross earnings have been reduced 
from 8.64 per cent to 4.16 per cent by almost exactly 
equal steps. 

Some Facts Regarding the Northern Ohio Traction 
AND Light Company 

The Northern Ohio Traction & Light Company oper- 
ates interurban railroads from Cleveland to Uhrichs- 
ville, Ohio, and from Wadsworth to Ravenna, Ohio, in 
six different counties. It also operates the Akron, 
Canton and Massillon city lines. In addition it does a 
lighting business in Akron and a number of other mu- 
nicipalities. The railway system is the third largest 
in the State of Ohio. 

The safety organization of the company is under the 
general jurisdiction of the supervisor of safety, who is 
also general claim agent. There are five safety commit- 
tees, comprising sixty-five employees, selected from all 
departments of the organization. The line and shop de- 
partments have additional committees. The members 
of the safety committee are elected by the men of the 
different divisions by secret ballot. Very good men 
have thus been secured. There is also a general com- 
mittee made up of the heads of departments. The 
local safety committees made weekly reports on the 
suggestions which have been received, and these are 
acted upon promptly. 

Among the successful plans devised by the supervisor 
is the sending of an accident letter every two weeks to 
all employees. This contains suggestions as to how 
accidents can be eliminated, and calls their attention 
to the accidents that have occurred just previously and 
suggests how they could have been prevented. 

The general passenger agent of the company pub- 
lishes a bulletin twice a month. In this a certain 
amount of space is always given to safety matters. 
This bulletin is distributed free of charge on the cars 
of the company. 



Quarterly Pamphlet by New York Up- 

State Commission 

The Public Service Commission for the Second 
District of New York has just issued its regular quar- 
terly pamphlet containing abstracts of the quarterly 
reports made to it by the operating steam and elec- 
tric railroads of the State. The current pamphlets 
contain condensed balance sheets for each company 
as of Sept. 30, 1914, with corresponding figures for 
June 30, 1914, and condensed income statements show- 
ing revenue and expenses, fixed charges, etc., as re- ! 
ported for the three months ending Sept. 30, 1914. 
They also contain certain statistical data throwing 
light on operations during the quarter, such as the J 
amount of freight and the number of passengers car-j 
ried, ton-miles, passenger-miles, car-miles, etc. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



283 



Three- Phase Italian Passenger Locomotives 

These Additional Locomotives, Weighing 73 Metric Tons and Carrying Two 1300-hp Motors Each, Are for 
Passenger Service on the Giovi Subsidiary and Monza-Lecco Lines 

BY G. PONTECORVO, EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 



The Societa Italiana Westinghouse is now delivering 
to the Italian State Railway sixteen three-phase locomo- 
tives. These new machines have two 3300-volt, 16.7- 
cycle induction motors of 1300 hp each, of the slip-ring 
type. The stater windings are designed so that the coils 
can be grouped either for two-phase, six poles, or three- 
phase eight poles. Similarly the rotor has a special 
winding which can be connected for either two-phase, 
six poles, or three-phase, eight poles. Only seven slip 
rings are required. A group of three or a group of four 
of the seven slip rings can be connected to the stator 
of the second motor when a three-phase, eight-pole, or 
two-phase six-pole cascade is required. Otherwise they 
can be short-circuited through the water rheostat when 



a jet of water against the resistance plates to prevent 
concentration of heat at the surface of the water, but 
all the water assumes an even temperature. 

The automatic regulator is designed so as to regulate 
for constant watts instead of constant current, as was 
the case in the older type of rheostat. The regulator 
consists of a laminated core with a two-pole winding 
connected in series on the ground phase of the motor 
and constituting the stator, and of a double T-shaped 
rotor with a winding inserted between the other two 
phases. The torque exerted between stator and rotor is 
counterbalanced by a spring, and the tension of this 
spring can be regulated by the starting controller oper- 
ated by the motorman so as to predetermine the amount 




THREE-PHASE ITALIAN PASSENGER LOCOMOTIVES — FIG. 1 — THE LOCOMOTIVE WITH PANTOGRAPH SECTION AND DRIVING 
MECHANISM REMOVED, SHOWING THE RELATIVE LOCATION OF MOTORS AND CONTROLLERS TO THE DRIVERS 



the motors are connected in parallel to the line. The two 
motors, of course, are connected mechanically. 

By connecting the motors in parallel on the line (con- 
nected either for two-phase, six poles, or three-phase, 
eight poles), or connecting them in cascade, a four- 
speed combination can be obtained which at 16.7 cycles 
with a wheel diameter of 1.63 m ( = 64.2 in.) gives four 
running speeds of 23.3, 31, 46.6 and 62 m.p.h. These are 
fully sufficient for passenger service locomotives, not 
only on level lines, but also on fairly high grades. 

The change of the motor connections from parallel to 
cascade, and also from six to eight poles, two or three- 
phase, is made by a drum type controller operated 
through electropneumatic relays by a master controller. 
The method of starting the wound-rotor induction motor 
is by means of a liquid rheostat with an automatic regu- 
lation feature which increases or decreases automat- 
ically the amount of resistance inserted in the rotor, so 
as to keep the power absorbed from the line fixed at a 
predetermined value. It is also supplied with a motor- 
driven centrifugal pump which is inserted in the line as 
soon as the rheostat is in operation. This pump throws 



of power to be absorbed from the line by the motors. 
When the power absorbed by the motor exceeds a pre- 
determined value, the regulator tends to rotate in one 
direction, thereby increasing the resistance inserted in 
the rotor which in its turn decreases the power ab- 
sorbed; vice versa, when the power absorbed tends to 
decrease, the regulator rotates in the other direction, 
thus keeping the amount of power taken by the motor at 
a constant value. Besides the controller and liquid rheo- 
stat, the locomotive is equipped with the usual auxiliary 
apparatus and instruments. There is, however, in addi- 
tion, a small transformer to change the power supply 
from three to two-phase. 

Fig. 2 shows the connection between the overhead 
line and the primary switch through the trolley, im- 
pedance coils, and oil switch; also the circuit supplying 
the auxiliary apparatus with fuses, lightning arresters, 
and transformers. The three phases consist of two 
overhead wires and the rails or ground phase. There 
are, as already mentioned, four connections of windings 
and motors to obtain the four running speeds. Two 
connections are shown in Fig. 3; that is, the three- 



284 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 6 





THREE-PHASE ITALIAN PASSENGER LOCOMOTIVES — FIG. 
WIRING DIAGRAM SHOWING CONNECTIONS FROM 
:, THE TROLLEY TO THE MOTOR SWITCH AND 

AUXILIARY APPARATUS 



1. Contact wires ; 2, trolley ; 3, inductance coils ; 4, automatic 
circuit breaker ; 5, primary switch ; 6 and 7, to motor primaries ; 
8 and 9, connections of automatic regulator for cascade and paral- 
lel connection, respectively; 10, ground connections; 11, stationary 
part of automatic regulator; 12, fuses: 13, lightning arresters; 14, 
transformers with primary and secondary, A and B, respectively. 

phase, eight-pole cascade and the two-phase six-pole 
parallel. All of these connections are made by the con- 
trollers, which are never operated under load. The con- 
nections from the slip rings to the water rheostat are 
shown in'Fig. 4. The water level, rising in the rheostat, 
fills the space between the plates, thus short-circuiting 
Ijhe rotor windings, which are connected to the plates as 
shown!" The controller, the trolley and the liquid rheo- 
stat, are operated by compressed air supplied by a small 
three-p"hase motor and compressor, which also supplies 
the air for the two air brakes (the automatic and 
straight air brakes). 

The motors are well ventilated with air circulation 
through stator iron and winding. The stator end con- 
nections are dipped in an insulating compound and 
then covered with a brass plate to prevent damage. 
Experience has shown that this construction has done 
away with insulation break-downs due to moisture and 
vibration caused by heavy currents at starting. 

This locomotive has five axles, and is of the 2-6-2 type, 
that is to say, two axles are supporting axles and the 
other three are driving. The two supporting axles are 



Three-Phase Rings 



Two-Phase Rings 

THREE-PHASE ITALIAN PASSENGER LOCOMOTIVES — FIG. 4— 
LINE DIAGRAM OF LIQUID RHEOSTAT CONNEC- 
TIONS FROM THE MOTOR SLIP RINGS 

placed one at each end of the locomotive, and each is 
connected to the driving axle next to it so as to form a 
kind of truck. All three driving axles have a transverse 
play for easy operation on curves. The slip rings are 
outside the wheelbase and easily accessible. 

The weight of the locomotive, complete, is 73 metric 
tons, of which 45 to 51 tons is adhesive weight. The 
weight on the drivers can be changed within these fig- 
ures by an arrangement which shifts the weight from 
the drivers to the supporting axles. The weight and 
dimensions of the locomotive are given in Table I. 

Table I — Weights and Dimensions 

Weights 

, K ^ 

Items Kg. Lb. 

Mechanical equipment 30,650 67,500 

Motor equipment 27,270 60,000 

Control equipment 12,700 28,000 

Air-brake equipment 2,300 5,050 

Dimensions 

, • V 

Items Meters In. 

Maximum width 3.05 120 

Maximum length 11.00 434 

Diameter of driving wheels 1.63 64 

Diameter of pony truck wheels 0.93 37. S 

The motors are mounted on the frame in such a way 
that the air gap of the motor can be kept as small as 
electrical considerations will permit. This is done by 
making the bearings which support the rotor rigid with 
the stator frame, and independent of those which sup- 
port the revolving shaft. The motors are connected to 
the driving wheels by a Scotch yoke similar to that of 
the Giovi locomotive. 

These locomotives are designed for the Giovi subsid- 
iary line and for the Monza-Lecco line, which connects 
Milan to the Lake of Como and the Valtellina lines 
which were electrified in 1901 with the same system. 
The Monza line is level single-track, while the Giovi 
subsidiary is double-track and has fairly high grades, 
reaching 1.6 per cent in the open and 1.16 in a 5.2-mile 
tunnel. 





THREE-PHASE ITALIAN PASSENGER LOCOMOTIVES — FI6. 3 — TYPICAL MOTOR CONNECTIONS 
Showing the method of connectlngr the two motors for three-phase,eight-pole, cascade (left) and for two-phase, six-pole parallel. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



285 



Operating Results 

Some figures regarding the performance and tests of 
this type of locomotive may be interesting. The normal 
rating of the two motors is 2600 hp at three-phase, 
16 2/3 cycles, 3300 volts and is such that the locomotive 
can develop for one hour continuously the drav^^bar pulls 
given in Table II with a motor temperature rise not ex- 
ceeding 75 deg. Cent. 



I 



Table II— 


-Relations Between 
Drawbar Pull 


Drawbak 


Pull 
Speed 


AND Speed 


Kg. 

9,000 

9,000 

9,500 

6,000 


Lb. 

19,800 
19,800 
20,900 
13,200 


Km.p.h. 

37.5 

50 

75 

100 




M.p.h. 
23.3 
31 
46.6 
62 



This locomotive can start a train of 350 tons (ex- 
P elusive of locomotive) and bring it up to 75 kw p.h. 
(= 46.6 m.p.h.) speed on a straight line having a grade 
of 1.2 per cent with an acceleration of 0.15 km (= 0.093 
mile) per hour per second ; the tractive effort at starting 
is such as to utilize fully the adhesion between zero and 
75 km (= 46.6 miles) per hour speed. 

Of these locomotives the Italiana Westinghouse Com- 
pany has already built sixteen and their operation is 
very satisfactory. They are run regenerating on the 
down grades, in this way greatly reducing the operating 
expenses. Their cost compares favorably with the cost 
of electric locomotives in the United States; however, 
the ratio of horse-power to weight, or 2300:73, is con- 
siderably higher. 

These locomotives are rapidly solving the problems 
of high speed freight and passenger service on the 
lines on which they have been installed. Some doubts 
were expressed some time ago as regards the overhead 
line having two wires. However, no trouble has been 
experienced, although the overhead construction, with 
sliding pantograph construction, would be considered 
rather light in this country for such service. 



Change in Car-Wiring Code Recommended 

At the tenth annual convention of the Western Asso- 
ciation of Electrical Inspectors held at the Hotel Ra- 
disson, Minneapolis, Minn., on Jan. 26-28, the report of 
the committee on electric traction systems recommended 
a change in the car wiring and equipment code as now 
used by the National Board of Fire Underwriters. 
These recommendations were approved by the associa- 
tion and will be submitted to the electrical committee 
of the National Fire Protection Association at its next 
meeting. The existing code appears in the 1913 edi- 
tion of the National Electrical Code, which contains the 
rules of the National Board of Fire Underwriters. 

Some of the more important amendments to the code 
include recommendations for self-closing doors in 
cabinets and for watertight conduit joints with drain 
holes provided at points where moisture is liable to 
collect. Also the combustible underside of car bodies 
should be protected with a fire-resisting material over 
all electrical apparatus. Rheostats which are at all 
times energized by trolley current should be surrounded 
by a grounded No. 8 wire netting guard having a 1-in. 
mesh. Wires for circuits controlling contactors, unit 
switches and cut-outs should not be run in the same 
cable, channel or conduit with power wires. Trans- 
formers or compensators should have their cases or 
shells thoroughly grounded. Arresters, choke coils and 
their connections should be installed ahead of all other 
electrical devices and metal conduit. 

Included under the topic of electrical heaters were a 
number of revisions requiring that heaters should have 
metal inclosures which were thoroughly grounded and 
which should prevent inflammable material from col- 



lecting around or inside of heater casings. Panel 
heaters should be so mounted that there will be 4 in. 
between the heating element and any combustible ma- 
terial. Heaters should be so mounted that the heat can- 
not vent into the area back of the heater. Cross-seat 
heaters either should be mounted at least 4 in. below 
the under side of seats, or else the under side of the 
seat should be protected by not less than % in. of fire- 
resisting insulating material. All conductors should 
have a rubber insulation surrounded by an outer flame- 
proof covering, and all circuits should be in approved 
metal conduit or molding installed according to rules. 
Switches meeting with the underwriters' requirements 
are to be provided and inclosed in a metal cabinet. 

In order to put before the association some sugges- 
tions regarding changes in the carhouse wiring rules 
and instructions as included in the underwriters' code, 
J. S. Mahan, Chicago, chairman of the committee that 
is investigating this subject, reported a tentative set 
of revised rules. No action was taken on these sugges- 
tions, the committee being at liberty to proceed with 
the work of revising the rules. It is the plan of this 
committee to submit copies of the proposed rules to 
various master mechanics and superintendents of mo- 
tive power of electric railways throughout the country 
for their criticisms and suggestions before submitting 
them to the association in final form. Copies of the 
proposed carhouse rules may be obtained by addressing 
F. R. Daniel, chairman of the electric traction system 
committee. Insurance Exchange Building, Chicago. 
Like the revised car-wiring rules it is intended to bring 
the carhouse-wiring rules, as well as the arrangement, 
up to date, so that they will be more readily available 
to those interested in using them. 

Burton McCollum of the United States bureau of 
standards presented an exhaustive discussion on the 
subject of electrolysis. He recommended primarily a 
proper definition of the responsibilities of both rail- 
ways and the pipe-owning companies in the prevention 
of electrolytic damage, but advocated co-operation in all 
cases. Where rules governing electrolysis mitigation 
are necessary, they should preferably be erected and 
administered by state authority, under which the neces- 
sary administrative machinery is available. In their 
absence, however, the cities in which the utilities oper- 
ate should take the initiative. The federal government, 
while competent to carry out, as it is now doing, en- 
gineering investigations bearing on the problem, should 
not, and in fact cannot, undertake to prescribe or ad- 
minister regulations. Where state public utilities com- 
missions are in existence, they are the most logical 
authority. Such state commissions not only are able 
to deal with the subject in a more comprehensive way 
than the majority of local bodies, especially in smaller 
cities, but their freedom from local political influence 
will often enable them to deal more wisely with all in- 
terests involved. 

It is most desirable that regulations be made as few 
and as simple as possible, to the end that the utilities 
concerned may enjoy the greatest freedom of action 
consistent with safety to the underground structures. 
The present apparent necessity for regulation is due to 
the lack of co-operation in the past between the rail- 
ways and the owners of underground utilities. If the 
interests concerned, particularly the railways, would 
show a greater disposition to meet the issue squarely, 
and if, instead of practically ignoring the subject as 
has been too often done they would treat the matter as 
one of the engineering problems connected with the 
operation of street railways, the need for stringent 
regulation would be largely eliminated. In the absence 
of such a policy, however, compulsory and perhaps 
burdensome regulations will be inevitable. 



286 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 6 



Saving Energy in Car Propulsion 

W. N. Storer Analyzed the Possibilities of Energy Saving by Improved Methods of Car Design and Operation 

at a Joint Engineering Meeting in Chicago on Jan. 25. 



On Jan. 25, at a joint meeting of the electrical section 
of the Western Society of Engineers and the Chicago 
branch of the A. I. E. E., W. N. Storer, general engineer 
railway department Westinghouse Electric & Manufac- 
turing Company, delivered a paper under the title 
"Economy of Power Consumption on Electric Railways." 
The purpose of the paper was to show how economy in 
energy consumption can be secured and the limitations 
imposed in the application of the different methods. He 
called attention to Samuel Insull's, April, 1912, A. I. 
E. E. paper, in which the statement was made that not 
far from 1,000,000 tons of coal would be burned in Chi- 
cago in that year to furnish power for electric railways. 
In Mr. Insull's opinion not less than 40 per cent and 
possibly 50 per cent of the coal consumption could have 
been saved by the use of all possible economies. Mr. 



Storer discussed the subject of loss reduction under 
these heads. 

Train Resistance 

The train resistance of a street car varies between 
10 lb. and 20 lb. per ton, corresponding to about 25 to 
50 watt-hours per ton-mile. As the total power con- 
sumption usually varies from 120 to 180 watt-hours 
per ton-mile, probably not more than 25 per cent of the 
total energy is used in overcoming resistance. The 
proportion is larger in elevated and subway service, 
where runs are longer and many curves are encountered, 
especially where the speed becomes so high as to give 
a high air resistance. 

Train resistance can be reduced in the following 
ways : Journal friction, which is probably not more than 




200 



500 
AMPERES 



400 



&0 
AMPERES 

SAVING ENERGY IN CAR PROPULSION — MOTOR LOSSES — FIG. 1, 500-VOLT, 50-HP MOTOR — FIG. 2, 550-VOLT, 

210-HP MOTOR 



500 



Storer stated that, since that time, cars have been in- 
stalled on the Chicago Surface Lines which have cut 
the power consumption per car-mile to less than 67 per 
cent of that of older cars of the same capacity. 

A large part of the energy now consumed is unneces- 
sarily wasted, but on account of the large investment in 
existing equipment the waste must continue until the 
older cars and equipment are worn out. Even in the 
most modern equipment considerable power is wasted. 
The waste can be reduced by reduction of weight to be 
handled and by increase in the efficiency of the equip- 
ment used in handling it. 

Reduction in weight has been secured by the use of 
two-motor equipment with maximum traction trucks 
instead of four-motor equipment, by the reduction in 
motor capacity made possible by the weight reduction, 
and by the use of motors weighing less per horse-power. 
Along with these reductions has gone the lightening of 
car bodies and trucks. 

The energy consumed by electric cars is practically 
all dissipated in overcoming train resistance, in ascend- 
ing grades, in motor losses, in gears and motor axle 
bearings, in rheostats, in auxiliaries and in brakes. Mr. 



6 lb. per ton in average service, can be practically 
eliminated by the use of ball or roller bearings, result- 
ing in an energy saving of from 6 to 15 watt-hours per 
ton-mile and possibly more. In high-speed railroading 
air resistance, which at a speed of 60 m.p.h. may amount 
to 800 lb. or 1000 lb. and may require from 110 kw to 
150 kw to overcome it, can be reduced by eliminating 
projections which cause eddies in the atmosphere. 
Flange friction can be reduced by eliminating bad 
curves, by effective tramming of trucks, by removing 
inequalities in wheel diameter and other causes tending 
to make the wheels hug one rail. 

Grade Resistance and Motor Losses 

Power required in ascending grades can be decreased 
only by reducing weight, although it is sometimes pos- 
sible to use the energy stored in a train in descending 
one grade to help it up the next. This is seldom done 
in street car work, but is quite common on lines where 
long runs are made. Short grades of 1 per cent or 2 per 
cent on interurban or elevated lines add very little to 
the power consumption. 

The efficiency of a railway motor varies from 80 per 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



287 



cent to 90 per cent, small motors ordinarily used in city 
service having a maximum efficiency, including gears 
and axle bearings, of 85 per cent to 86 per cent, while 
large motors run 2 per cent or 3 per cent higher. The 
nature of the losses in typical commutating-pole motors 
is illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2. An increase in efficiency 
is sure to be accomplished by the production of a 
heavier and more expensive motor, as, other things 
being equal, the capacity of a given size of motor is 
practically dependent on its efficiency. It is, therefore, 
fairly certain that the efficiency of railroad motors is as 
high as the state of the art will permit with present 
commercial conditions. 

Mr. Storer took for illustration the losses due to 
friction and windage, which he translated into terms 
of train resistance. He stated that a motor of from 
40-hp to 50-hp capacity should have approximately 400 
watts friction loss with a car speed of 10 m.p.h., corre- 
sponding to about a 20-lb. train resistance. With a two- 
motor car, weighing 20 tons, armature friction and 
windage amounts to 2 lb. per ton. The axle-bearing 
losses would probably be about one-half as much. There 
are few data available from which gear and axle-bear- 
ing losses can be determined, but it is hoped that in the 
near future further tests will be made which will enable 
the standardization committee of the A. I. E. E. to give 
more definite figures for the efficiency of axle bearings 
and gears. 

It is possible to use some form of frictionless bear- 
ing for armatures, but such bearings as yet have not 





l< T -- 


-->J 




SAVING ENERGY IN CAR PROPULSION — RHEOSTATIC LOSSES 
DURING ACCELERATION 

Fig. 3, parallel control ; Fig. 4, series-parallel control ; Fig. 5, 
series, series-parallel, parallel control. Shaded areas show rheo- 
static losses. 

had sufficient tests under heavy service conditions to 
justify their adoption, especially as the cost is consider- 
ably higher than the ordinary sleeve bearing. 

Kheostatic Losses 

In the matter of rheostatic losses, it is impossible to 
avoid such losses altogether, but they can be reduced to 
a much lower amount than has ordinarily been the prac- 
tice. Figs. 3, 4 and 5 show the relative rheostatic 
losses in straight parallel control, standard series- 
parallel control, and control using full series, series- 
parallel and full parallel, respectively. In these dia- 
grams the shaded areas represent rheostatic losses. If 
two motors are assumed to accelerate with a current to 
give 10 per cent voltage drop in the internal resistance 
of each motor, then, as shown in Fig. 3, 90 per cent of 
the voltage will be lost in the rheostat at the instant of 
starting and an average of 45 per cent during the time 
the rheostat is in circuit. During the entire time of 
acceleration, double motor current will be taken from 
the line. As shown in Fig. 4, with series-parallel con- 
trol, the rheostatic power loss at starting will be 80 
per cent of the line voltage with single motor current, 
or an average of 40 per cent of the line voltage multi- 
plied by single motor current during the time the car is 
accelerating in series. The total time will be divided 
between series and parallel in the ratios of the counter 
emfs after the resistance is cut out. In this case it 
will be in the ratio of 40 to 90, or 44.4 per cent of the 



time will be spent in series and 55.6 per cent in parallel 
up to the time the motor curve is reached. When the 
motors are connected in parallel the voltage applied to 
the motor terminals is only 50 per cent of the line volt- 
age, consequently the remainder of the line voltage, or 
50 per cent, is lost in the rheostat. The average drop 
in the rheostat will be 24 per cent for 55.6 per cent of 
the time. If A is the current for one motor, T the 
time to reach the motor curve and E the line voltage, 
then, in rheostatic control, the loss is 

If = 2 A X 0.45 £7 X 2^ = 0.9 A £• r 

The total energy taken from the line during this 
acceleration \% 2 AE T, and 45 per cent is lost in the 
rheostat. 

In series-parallel control the rheostatic loss is 

IF = A X 0.4 £■ X 0.444 T + 2 A X 0.25 E X 0.556 T = 
0.456 A E T 

The total energy from the line in this case is 
W = AE X 0.444 T + 2A E X 0.556 T = 1.556 AE T 

The rheostatic loss is thus cut almost in half by using 
series-parallel control instead of parallel control, and the 
total energy during acceleration on resistance is reduced 
more than 22 per cent. 

The use of four-motor equipment makes it possible to 
go still further, as is illustrated in Fig. 5. The rheo- 
static loss in this case is the same as in the case shown 
in Fig. 4, except for the area of the rectangle cut out by 
full series operation, the area of which is 0.083 A E T. 
The total rheostatic loss is thus 

W = (0.456 — 0.083) AET = 0.373 AET, 

a decrease of 18.3 per cent below that of series-parallel 
control. The energy taken from the line during the time 
on rheostat is (1.556 — 0.083) A E = 1.473 A E T, a 
reduction of 53 per cent. Since the rheostatic loss in 
ordinary city service is only 12 per cent to 20 per cent 
of the total energy used, the saving resulting from 
starting with four motors in series can scarcely exceed 
1 per cent of the total, unless there is a great deal of 
operation at extremely low speeds. 

A recently exploited system combines the operation 
of four motors connected successively in series, series 
parallel, and parallel, with intermediate steps using three 
motors and a limited amount of rheostatic operation. A 
portion of the rheostatic losses is eliminated through 
unequal loading of the motors, due to doubling the volt- 
age on one motor at a time, thus heavily overloading it 
without a serious surge in the acceleration. A saving of 
from 8 per cent to 10 per cent in power is effected. 

Other things being equal, the rheostatic loss varies 
as the square of the speed at which the motor curve is 
reached in acceleration. The characteristics of the 
motor and the rate of acceleration have, therefore, a 
great deal to do with the rheostatic loss. For example, 
a motor with a steep speed characteristic, geared for a 
certain schedule speed, will reach the motor curve at 
a lower speed than one with a flat speed curve which is 
geared to the same speed, and will thus have less rheo- 
static loss. A higher rate of acceleration will enable the 
motor curve to be reached at a lower speed, especially 
with a non-saturated motor. The rheostatic losses are 
thus reduced in the same way. 

The shape of the speed curve has been too often left 
out of consideration because the unsaturated motor, the 
one with the steep speed curve, is usually slightly 
heavier than the saturated motor of the same rating and 
armature speed. 

Field Control 

After the series-parallel control and the single reduc- 
tion motor were introduced, the control of the field as a 



288 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 6 



means of affecting economical speed variation and re- 
duction of rheostatic losses was dropped because of the 
trouble from poor commutation and overloading of 
motors. The use of the commutating-pole motor and a 
better understanding of the application of railway 
motors to given service have led to a revival of field 



in the train at the time the brakes were applied is all 
lost either in the brakes or in overcoming train resist- 
ance during braking. In this case the brakes were 
applied at 16.3 m.p.h., and reference to the stored 
energy curves shows that at this speed TVo watt-hours 
per ton are stored. Part of this (4 watt-hours) is 




100 25r 

90 

80 20 

70 

O 60 15 
uJ r 

°- 50£i; 
^ 40 10 

50 

ZO 5 

10 





A 




















J\ 




















c 


1 




■\ 


^ 












•^ 


' 


Y 










A 










/ 


'\ 










\ 








/ 


/ 












\ 


i 






1 


/ 














\ 






u 
















\ 






















\ 


V 




1 


















\ 





10 



20 



30 
SECONDS 



40 



50 



SAVING ENERGY IN CAR PROPULSION — RHEOSTATIC LOSSES — FIG. 6, SERIES-PARALLEL CONTROL; FIG. 7, SAME WITH 

FIELD CONTROL. SHADED AREAS SHOW RHEOSTATIC LOSSES 

Data: Weight of loaded car, 20 tons; two SO-hp, r,nO-volt m->tors ; 33-in. -nheels, gear ratio, 16:68 (Fig. 6), 15.69 (Pig. 7); 
rate of acceleration and braking, li^ m.p.h. p.s. ; stops per mile. 6 : duration of stop, 7 sec; schedule speed, 11 m.p.h.; watt-hours 
per ton-mile, (Pig. 6) 112.S, (Pig. 7) 103.8. 



control which is now used in all classes of service, 
usually effecting a saving of from 10 per cent to 20 
per cent in power consumption. To get the best results 
the motor should be geared to give the highest speed 
desired with a short or permanent field. The full-field 
speed curve should be 20 per cent to 25 per cent or more 
if possible, lower than this short field speed curve at the 
accelerating tractive effort. Referring to Fig. 4 and 
assuming that the full speed of the motor at the ac- 
celerating tractive effort is 20 per cent below that of 
the short field and, as the same rate of acceleration is 
maintained, a field control equipment would perform the 
same service with approximately one-half the rheostatic 
loss. Where the balancing speed on short field is higher 
than that of the non-field controlling equipment, a still 
further saving in power consumption results on account 
of the more rapid acceleration on the motor curve, per- 
mitting a longer coasting period and consequently a 
lower speed at the time the brakes are applied and less 
loss in that period. Where stops are frequent the use of 
field control effects a very substantial saving. Typical 
speed-time graphs are shown side by side in Figs. 6 and 
7, Fig. 6 showing a typical run with standard motors 
without field control and Fig. 7 the same run under iden- 
tical conditions of load and speed, but with field control. 
The difference in rheostatic losses is shown by the 
shaded areas. 

Fig. 8 shows a set of general curves which may be 
applied to almost any condition of acceleration. They 
are intended primarily to exhibit the rheostatic losses 
entailed in accelerating 1 ton under certain conditions of 
motor efficiency, train resistance and rate of accelera- 
tion, with and without field control. With these curves 
are included others showing watt-hour input, rheostatic 
losses with and without field control, and energy losses 
in overcoming train resistance, all plotted in terms of 
speed at which the motor curve is reached. 

To show how these curves may be used, take the 
speed-time curve shown in Fig. 6. The energy stored 



stored while accelerating on resistance at an efficiency of 
approximately 56 per cent; the remainder (Z\'-2 watt- 
hours) with motors accelerating on the motor curve at 
an efficiency of about 83 per cent. The first portion. 




15 ZO 

M.P.H. OFF GRIDS 

SAVING ENERGY IN CAR PROPULSION — FIG. 8 — ANALYSIS OF 
POWER CONSUMPTION IN STRAIGHT-LINE ACCELERATION 

Data; Weight, 1 ton; acceleration, 1.7 in.p.h.p.s. ; acceleration 
force, 185 lb. ; control, series-parallel, with and without field con- 
trol ; motor efficiency at full voltage, 85 per cent. 

4 watt-hours at 56 per cent efficiency, takes 7.15 watt- 
hours from the line; the section portion, 3V2 watt-hours 
at 83 per cent efficiency, takes 4.22 watt-hours from the 
line, a total of 11.37 watt-hours for each stop or 68.22 
watt-hours per ton-mile. A train resistance of 20 lb. 
per ton would normally require, with an average effi- 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



289 



ciency of 80 per cent, 50 watt-hours per ton-mile, but 
since the braking period has already been included, a 
deficit of 13.5 per cent must be deducted, leaving 43 Vi 
watt-hours. The total per ton-mile is then 111.47 watt- 
hours. This compares with 112.8 watt-hours, as given 
in the figures. 

The ratio of the sum of the curves of stored energy 
and friction to the curve of input is the efficiency of the 
equipment during acceleration to the motor curve. 
With the conditions of motor efficiency, train resistance, 
etc., assumed, this efficiency is found to be approxi- 
mately 56 per cent. It will hold approximately con- 
stant regardless of the time of acceleration or whether 
on level or grade. The rheostatic loss with a given 
tractive effort is inversely proportional to the rate of 
acceleration; in other words, if the car were starting 
on a grade that would cut the rate of acceleration in 
half, the time on the rheostat would be doubled and 
the rheostatic loss double that shown on the curve. 
This curve is a good check on the speed-time curve. 

[ Other Possible Means for Saving Energy 

Among the other means for saving rheostatic losses 
there is notably one in which the voltage on the motors 
is varied by means of a motor-generator set. Such a 
system is in operation in Paris and is reported to be 
giving very economical results. It is understood that 
this equipment is also operated to vary the voltage 
applied to the motor during the braking period so as to 
regenerate the stored energy of the train and return 
it to the line. Such a system must require a relatively 
large capacity of motor-generator set on the car and 
the cost of this set and the extra cost of motors and 
control would be considerable, while the additional 
weight to be carried around and the losses in the motor- 
generator set would go a long way toward absorbing 
any savings that might be made. 

In conclusion, Mr. Storer discussed the possibilities 
of regenerative systems of control and prophesied that 
some plan will be developed to prevent the present 
enormous destruction of energy, which costs a great 
deal simply to destroy. He considered the proposition 
of elevating station tracks above those between stations 
for the purpose of changing the kinetic energy of the 
moving train into the potential energy of the train 
on an elevation. Theoretically, this is the most effi- 
cient method, but as a matter of fact the elevation 
which it would be necessary to climb is so great that its 
use would greatly increase the cost of any construction, 
the elevated railway stations would be so high as to 
require elevators to take passengers to and from the 
streets, and it could be used only with very short 
trains. Induction motors lend themselves to regener- 
ative control readily and in many of the cases where 
it has been applied the saving in wear and tear on the 
brakes and the reduction in danger of accidents are 
more important than the savings. 

With direct current motors regeneration has been 
accomplished by the use of shunt motors, but these have 
been used only to a very limited extent.* In Mr. 
Storer's opinion the essential of an equipment for re- 
generative braking with d.c. motors is the use of the 
standard series-wound motor with a control equipment 
that will add but little weight and complication to that 
used without regeneration, since every bit of additional 
weight and complication would mean additional first 
cost, additional cost of maintenance, and additional 
power to carry it around. The point would soon be 
reached where the extra cost balances the saving. 

Mr. Storer called attention to the fact that he had 



said nothing directly concerning the importance of 
correct gear ratio, or the correct operation of equip- 
ment so as to take advantage of the benefits of rapid 
acceleration, long coasting, quick braking and short 
stops. He did not touch upon the saving resulting from 
the use of high efficiency lamps and the best distribu- 
tion of light, nor of the use of the latest methods of car 
heating. He did not discuss line loss and its relation to 
the reduction in peak load by means of field control and 
proper gear ratio. He stated that these points have all 
been fully discussed. The reduction of dead weight 
per passenger, the adoption of frictionless bearings 
and the widest use of field control with motors of steep 
speed characteristics, and efficient handling of cars 
will alone be sufficient to save more than 40 per cent of 
the power now used on a great many roads. Any sav- 
ing that can be accomplished by the development of a 
successful scheme for regenerating the power now lost 
in brakes would be so much clear gain. 

Discussion 
Mr. Storer's paper was discussed by H. H. Adams, 
Chicago Surface Lines, who stated that 33 1/3 per 
cent reduction in current consumption had been ob- 
tained on this road, on the cars equipped with field con- 
trol motors. This reduction in energy consumption had 
made possible a reduction from 4 kw-hr. to 2i/^ kw-hr. 
per ton-mile. H. A. Johnson, of the Chicago Elevated 
Railways, suggested that many interurb.-'.n railways 
could profitably undertake a careful study of their 
equipment with a view to eliminating useless weight. 
He believed' that a large percentage of light-weight 
cars could be used in interurban service without entail- 
ing operating difficulties or reducing the comfort to 
passengers. Wray Thorn, equipment engineer of the 
Board of Supervising Engineers, Chicago Traction, 
called attention to the fact that the savings made pos- 
sible by improved motor designs would represent a 25 
per cent increase in the net earnings per car per year 
when the gross was assumed as 80 cents. In obtaining 
this result Mr. Thorn assumed that the total expense 
of operation per car-mile was 26 cents, of which 31/2 
cents per car-mile was chargeable for power. Power 
cost represents about 13.5 per cent of the total cost of 
operation, and the purchase of new equipment had 
permitted a 4 per cent reduction of this item. E. J. 
Blair, of the Chicago Elevated Railways, and W. B. 
Jackson also took part in the discussion. 



•[Note — An account of a recent instaUation of this type, that of 
the Wendelstein Railway in Bavaria, is given on page 274 of this 
issue. — Eds.] 



I. C. C. Report on Steam Railroads in 1913 

The division of statistics of the Interstate Commerce 
Commission has issued the preliminary abstract of its 
twenty-sixth annual report, covering steam railroads for 
the fiscal year ended June 30, 1913. During this year 
the mileage of single track operated increased 1.67 
per cent, whereas the total mileage of all tracks operated 
increased 2.39 per cent. The total of railroad capital 
on June 30, 1913, was $19,796,125,712, the increase over 
last year being divided $131,723,168 for funded debt 
and $116,763,035 for stock. The average receipts per 
passenger per mile were 2.008 cents, the corresponding 
figures for the previous year being 1.985 cents, an 
increase of 0.023 cent. The average receipts per ton 
per mile for the year were 0.729 cent, which was smaller 
than the corresponding average for 1912 and 1911. 
The rail operating revenues increased $298,177,432 
during the year and the operating expenses $210,874,- 
266, giving an increase in net operating revenue of 
$87,303,166. The total revenue, including that from 
outside operations, increased $88,290,224. Taxes during 
the year increased nearly 8 per cent. Dividends de- 
clared from surplus were $85,706,629, as compared to 
$100,435,589 for the preceding year. 



290 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 6 



COMMUNICATIONS 



The President's Address 

INTERBOROUGH KAPID TRANSIT COMPANY 

New York, Feb. 5, 1915. 
To the Editors r 

While I was not able to reach the Washington meet- 
ing of the Railway Association in time to hear Presi- 
dent Wilson's address, as a railway operator I appre- 
ciate the importance and significance of the occasion. 
The association is to be congratulated upon the fact that 
the President took this opportunity to express through 
the association to the country his ideas on some funda- 
mental business questions. 

I agree with the President that nothing is so helpful 
to a better understanding among people as to meet and 
discuss their problems together. He set an example of 
this last week at the meeting of our association, an 
example which was followed by other prominent repre- 
sentatives of the federal government at the meeting and 
the banquet. This plan could well be followed not only 
at formal gatherings of railway men but whenever, dur- 
ing the year, differences of opinion arise or seem to 
arise in regard to the conduct of electric railway mat- 
ters. Indeed, this is an advantage of commission regu- 
lation, that the public utility interests and the public, 
as represented by the authorities, can meet face to face 
to consider their mutual problems, and in this way each 
side can learn the attitude and opinions of the other. 
Theodore P. Shonts, President. 



Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company 

Brooklyn, N. Y., Feb. 2, 1915. 
To the Editors : 

In response to your inquiry regarding my impression 
of President Wilson's Washington speech I would say 
that it was full of good ideas and was hopeful in tone. 
I should have liked it better if it had amplified the 
necessity on the part of the government, in its dealings 
with corporations and in its own administration ac> 
counting, of recognizing and following the same high 
standard of honesty and fair dealing which it seeks to 
establish in private and corporate business. 

T. S. Williams, President. 



Elevated Railroads of Chicago 

Chicago, III., Feb. 4, 1915. 
To the Editors: 

From President Wilson's address, the impression was 
gained that he is of the opinion that the large business 
interests of the country could now look forward with 
confidence to a period of prosperity, and that business 
properly and lawfully conducted need not fear attacks 
indiscriminately by various governmental bodies, as has 
been the practice for several years past. The President 
evidently realizes that the business of the country is in 
need of encouragement, and it is welcome to hear this 
note sounded by the Chief Executive of the nation. 

If a spirit of friendly co-operation with the business 
interests of the country permeated the national, state 
and municipal governments, there would be no lack of 
capital and few unemployed men in the United States. 
However, for business men to believe that governmental 
bodies will cease to harass business is expecting too 
much at the present time. The era of restored confi- 
dence which President Wilson believes is now upon us, 
will not come until the people fully realize what serious 
injury is being done, and has been done, to their in- 
terests for years, by self-seeking politicians and irre- 
sponsible reformers. Indications, however, point to a 
change not far distant, when the public will comprehend 



the true relation between their own welfare and prop- 
erly conducted business, and the arguments and wiles- 
of the politician and reformer will not meet with the 
easy conquests they have in the past. 

When the people elect to public office men who will 
aid legitimate business, whether big or little, in every 
possible way, and work for the commercial supremacy 
of the United States, then and then only, will prosperity 
be assured. In England and Germany business is not 
only fostered but is also successfully governed, and the 
business man is honored and his counsel sought. In 
our country it has been quite the reverse. 

The American Electric Railway Association is work- 
ing along the right line in its endeavors to bring about 
a better understanding on the part of the public. The 
publicity program and high ideals set forth by Mr. 
Kingsbury in his able paper, will bring results not only 
desirable in the railway industry but equally applicable 
to the various business interests of the country. 

Britton I. BuDD, President. 



General Electric Company 

New York, Feb. 5, 1915. 
To the Editors : 

I want to express my thorough appreciation of the 
address delivered by President Wilson before the Amer- 
ican Electric Railway Association on Jan. 29, and espe- 
cially of the latter portion thereof in which he invites 
those connected with the electric railway industry, and 
others, to present their ideas on important public ques- 
tions. 

Seemingly our association could make no more fit- 
ting response to this invitation than to transmit to the 
President our recently adopted Code of Principles, which 
can hardly fail to receive his full endorsement. 

William J. Clark. 



McGuire-Cummings Manufacturing Company 
Chicago, III., Feb. 2, 1915. 
To the Editors : 

The impressive statements made in President Wil- 
son's talk last Friday before the American Electric 
Railway Association, lead us all to hope for better busi- 
ness. His administration came into existence pledged 
to accomplish the correction of abuses in business life 
and to a constructive work which would build to a 
greater and sounder prosperity. 

Some of the abuses he was pledged to correct have 
been corrected. I believe he has a comprehensive ap- 
preciation of commercial conditions as they exist to-day, 
and is going to do all he can, in a constructive way, to 
bring to us all, large and small, a revised code of busi- 
ness principles, and to do his best, notwithstanding 
adverse world conditions to bring us material pros- 
perity. John J. Cummings. 



Terminology for Steel Construction 

The American Railways Company 

Philadelphia, Pa., Feb. 1, 1915. 
To the Editors: 

In the article on the Cleveland Railway's new repair 
shops in your issue of Jan. 23, we notice that these 
buildings are described as being entirely fireproof. 
We notice, however, that in the interior view, the steel- 
work is shown as being entirely exposed. This condi- 
tion would not, therefore, be considered by us as en- 
tirely fireproof but as non-inflammable. It has been 
our practice and it appears to be the practice of the 
Cleveland Railway to use the money that would be 
needed to protect the steel work completely for the in- 
stallation of a sprinkling system. This would give pro- 
tection not only to the building but to its contents. 

While we are on the question of descriptive termi- 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



291 



nology we might call your attention to a recent state- 
ment in your Journal that cars which have steel 
underframes, steel sides and steel posts should be con- 
sidered to be "all-steel." This may be slightly mis- 
leading, as we are building cars of this general de- 
scription having outside steel sheathing up to the win- 
dow sill and steel posts, and carlines are one continuous 
piece but having the trim, floors, roof, sash and doors of 
wood. We have been considering these cars as semi- 
steel and think this is the general practice. 

C. G. Keen, Engineer Way and Structures. 

[Note — Our correspondent's first point is undoubtedly 
well taken. It is well known that exposed steelwork, in 
general, has less ability to resist the damaging effect 
of fire than wooden beams so that the buildings in ques- 
tion should have been classed as non-inflammable rather 
than fireproof. 

The definition for all-steel cars to which our corre- 
spondent refers was developed arbitrarily to avoid con- 
fusion in our statistics as published Jan. 2. Under it, 
cars with the continuous post-and-carline construction 
would be classed as all-steel only if they had steel letter- 
boards. Also, cars with all-steel framing and agasote 
roof sheathing would be classed as all-steel, the point 
being that the material used for roof sheathing is 
largely incidental. Of course, since this definition (like 
every other definition that could be used) is arbitrary, 
it is subject to difference of opinion, and we would be 
glad to receive other communications which might aid 
in the establishment of a definite and universally used 
terminology for the different types of car construc- 
tion. — Eds.] 



Stress Analysis of the Chicago Steel Car 

Cornell University 

Ithaca, N. Y., Jan. 4, 1915. 
To the Editors: 

We have been very much interested in the article en- 
titled "Analysis of Stresses in the Chicago Elevated 
Steel Car" published in your issue of Dec. 12, 1914, page 
1299. It occurred to us that it would be interesting to 
see how the "principle of least work" applied to an 
analysis of the stresses in this car would result. In 
consequence, we have worked out the problem as shown 
below and have obtained results which differ somewhat 
from those obtained by Mr. Johnson. The construction, 
as outlined by him, is undoubtedly entirely safe, but 
the application of the principle of least work seems to 
us to give a somewhat more exact, or at any rate, more 
logical method of analysis than the method employed 
by him. 

As the truss form described is an indeterminate one, 
it could not, of course, be solved by the ordinary meth- 
ods. The method employed by us also takes care of the 
forces in the truss due to the loads outside the bolsters 
which were probably also considered by Mr. Johnson, 



although the published solution does not indicate the 
way in which this was done. 

The following is our solution of the problem: The 
lower part of the car frame, consisting of the channel, 
belt rail and sheeting, forms a plate girder of which the 
sheeting is the web and the window posts are stiffeners. 
This girder is 36.5 in. high. Let F equal the total sec- 
tional area of plate girder, or 7.30 sq. in. ; y equal the co- 
ordinate of the center of gravity from top, or 19.75 in. ; 
and / equal the moment of inertia of section with respect 
to its gravity axis, or 1352 in.* 

Consider the left half of the truss. This includes 
the central door post, corner post and four window 
posts. Since the four window posts are slender and 
easily bent, their stress effect upon the upper chord can- 
not be much more than 200 lb. If required, their action 
could be considered, as is indicated later in this dis- 
cussion. For simplicity, however, 
we will for the present neglect 
them, and represent the frame as 
shown in Fig. 3. 

Here GF, FH, and HK are the 
center lines of the corner post, up- 
per chord and door posts respec- 
tively. The lower part GD is to 
be considered as a plate girder. 
The required dimensions, as far as 
they could be obtained, are given in 
the figure. With the loading uni- 
formly distributed, the load outside 
the bolsters comes to 40.7 lb. per 
linear inch, while inside the bol- 
sters it is 52.65 lb. per linear inch. 
The reaction of the bolster equals 
14,150 lb. Also let / equal the mo- 
ment of inertia of plate girder, or 
1352 in.'; /, equal the moment of 
inertia of end post FG, or 169 in.'; 
/j equal moment of inertia of cen- 
ter post HK, or 327 in.'; F equal 
the area of section of plate girder, 
or 7.30 sq. in. ; F^ equal the area of 
section of deck plate, or 1.44 sq. in. 
It is evident that Fig. 3 is an illustration of an inde- 
terminate truss. The unknown stress in the upper 
chord is represented by P. The problem now is to find 
the value of P. This cannot be found by simple statics, 
but by using integral calculus the "Principle of Least 
Work" can be applied. 

According to the principle of least work, of all 
the values that P might have, only that one is admis- 
sible which will make the total internal work done by 
the members a minimum. Let W represent the total 
internal work; then the true value of P that will make 

dW 
W a minimum is found by writing ^„ = 0. The ex- 

dP 



^ 


1 


"5 


« ' 


-W 


>6 


• s 


'M '■. 


Q{ 




*' ^^ 






1 






V 


' ^f^ 


-c 


^ 
^ 


'9 




k' 


. t - 


_ 




Gray. 




Line 




* 


...50"* 


^l 


k.i 


FIG. 1 — SECTION 


OF SII 


)E 


GIRDER 



n.raea 



^^i^'P-teSO Lb. 



'1. 

SP.38' 



19.75 



J'-^P^ 



"A 697S" 



Wi'407Lb.per ^ 
Lineal Inch ■*- 



X 

: n-70. 62 



£_ ^-OecJt_ Plate 

igjs' 

ji-Belfrail 



yj,"ta7 Lb. per Inch 

iiiiiiiiMiiHi;i| 

< se" j--!.. , 

c- X. >1 J<- 

CI c-^ Bolster-- 



-^Grav, Line cf Plate Girder 
\ Channel -~^ 



A 
J6^" 









* * 



W2'S2X5 Lb. per Inch 
I67BS"- - 



H laSOOLb. 



t T V f ' 



10,800 
Lb 



STRESS ANALYSIS — FIG. 2, STRESS IN SECTION OVER BOLSTER; FIG. 3, DIAGRAM SHOWING FORCES THAT ACT 

ON CAR FRAMING 



292 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[VOL. XLV, No. 6 



pression for W consists of a number of terms. Since 
we differentiate with respect to P we need to consider 
only those terms that will involve P. Any term that 
does not contain P will drop out in the differentiated 
expression. The work of shear need not be considered 
since the shear in the plate girder is not a function of 
P. This gives the following equation: 



dW 
~dP' 



^ B 



C 

M 



dM 



ds 



dP • bJl 



+ 



/ 



D 

dP ' 



Et 



r.. dM ds , f^^^ 
I dP £,/, / 



C 

ds 



dM 



aP £,/, 



PI 



Pi 



EF 



= 



The first term gives the internal work done between 
B and C due to the bending of the girder, and, 
omitting the details of integration, this equals 
105,400 + 60P 



B 



The second term is the work done be- 



tween C and D due to bending of girder, and this equals 
617P — 4,332,000 



E 



bending of end post FG, equalling 

term 

and this equals 



The third term is work due to 
283.5 P 



is work due to bending of door post 
1,583,000 + 146.5 P 



The fourth 
HK, 



~E~ 



is work due to compression in member FH, or 



The fifth term 
127.5 P 



E 



and the sixth term is work due to tension in girder, or 
25.2 P 



E 

If these values are substituted in the equation and 
this equation is simplified, we will obtain, since the fac- 
tor E divides out, 1259.7 P = 5,809,600, or P = 4620 lb. 

The value is considerably larger than that given by 
Mr. Johnson. As stated above, the influence of the 
window posts was neglected, since this influence is 
small. If this influence is considered it will increase 
the value of P a little. If desirable, the effect of the 
window posts can be included. In that case we will have 
five unknowns, and can obtain five equations similar 
to the equation above, and involving these five un- 
knowns. The solution of these equations gives us the 
required five quantities. This involves considerable la- 
bor and it seems hardly necessary. 

It may be of interest to determine the stresses in a 

section over the bolster. To do so, pass a section 

through the truss over the bolster and represent the 

forces as shown in Fig. 2. The forces acting on the 

girder consist of a shear (not represented), a system 

pi 
of forces forming a couple, M, equal to— ^^ (where p^ 

19.75 

equals stress in outer fiber due to bending), and a uni- 
formly distributed force, P, = p,F. If now moments 

Vj 
are taken about the neutral axis of the girder _ 

19. /o 

= 4620 X 70.62 + W, 86V2 = 477,800 in. lb. and p, = 
6980 lb. per square inch. Also p, = = 633 lb. per 

I .oO 

square inch. 

The total unit stress in outer fiber then equals 
p^-\-p^ = 7513 lb. per square inch. The belt rail has a 
sectional area of 1.5 sq. in. The approximate stress in 
the belt rail then is 1.5 X ^513 = 11,250 lb. 

It is not intended by this article to question the sizes 
of members in Mr. Johnson's design, but merely to 
show how the stresses might be found by another 
method. One advantage is that it can be used even 
if there is more than one redundant member in the 



truss, such as the deck plate in this case. The above 
calculations are based on a live load uniformly dis- 
tributed over the whole car. If we had assumed the 
platforms empty, the stress in the upper chord would 
have been about 4000 lb., according to Mr. Johnson's 
method, and about 30 per cent higher according to the 
method here given. 

E. W. Rettger and S. G. George, 
Assistant Professors Applied Mechanics. 



The " WE " Slogan Sign 

Kentucky Traction & Terminal Company 

Lexington, Ky., Jan. 27, 1915. 
To the Editors : 

I think that you may be interested in our "WE" slogan 
sign, which I am forwarding you. These signs we have 
been giving to the truckmen, merchants, conveyances of 
any and all character, and automobiles, with the request 
that they be carried on the conveyance and in this man- 
ner enlist them in the campaign. This sign, as you will 



wnropi 

BEFORE 

WE 

CROSS 

THE 

TRACK 



=D 



(iltT-Tftf 



WE SLOGAN SIGN 

note particularly, is not directory but implies that the 
initiative is being taken by the truckmen and- is not 
fostered by the railroad interest. 

Stop to consider the number of accidents, steam and 
electric, which have come under your direct attention, 
and probably many of which may be acquaintances, and 
you will realize the value of this slogan, which we feel 
is the most forcible thing we have brought forward in 
our "safety first" campaign. 

F. W. Bacon, Vice-President. 



Commission Report on Electric Interurban 

Lines of Iowa 

According to the thirty-sixth annual report of the 
Board of Railroad Commissioners of Iowa, for the year 
ended Dec. 1, 1913, the gross earnings from operation 
for the electric interurban lines of the State amounted 
to $2,330,385, as compared with $1,823,191 for the 
year previous. The operating expenses increased from 
$1,272,340 in 1912 to $1,453,624 in 1913, while the net 
earnings from operation increased from $550,851 in 
1912 to $876,761 in 1913. The net earnings per mile 
in 1912 were $1,607 and in 1913 $2,224. The interurban 
mileage (single track) increased from 342.74 miles in 
1912 to 394.23 miles in 1913. The outstanding capitali- 
zation per mile in 1913 was $39,832 for stock and 
$38,333 for bonds, as compared to $40,443 and $33,356 
in 1912, respectively. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



293 



ANNUAL CONVENTION 

SAN FRANCISCO 

OCTOBER 4 TO 8, 1915 



American Association News 



ANNUAL CONVENTION 

SAN FRANCISCO 

OCTOBER 4 TO 8, 1915 



Committee Activities Continue as Middle of Association Year Approaches — Claims Association Selects Subjects 
for Convention Program — Block Signal Committee Especially Busy 



JOINT COMMITTEE ON BLOCK SIGNALS 

Meetings of sub-committees on block signal details 
were held at association headquarters -on Jan. 26 and 27. 
Members of the committee in attendance were: J. M. 
Waldron, New York; J. W. Brown, Newark, N. J., and 
G. N. Brown, Syracuse, N. Y. Others in attendance by 
invitation were C. L. Cadle, Rochester, N. Y. ; R. V. 
Collins, United States Signal Company; S. N. Day, Gen- 
eral Railway Signal Company, and H. W. Griffin, Union 
Switch & Signal Company, who gives the committee 
valuable suggestions. The important matter taken up on 
Tuesday was the preparation of a form of statistical 
blank for the recording of signal maintenance cost re- 
ports. This will be submitted to the convention next 
October. A suggested list of requirements for trolley- 
contact signal operation was presented by Mr. Collins 
and this was discussed in detail, being accepted for 
further consideration by the committee. 

At the meeting on Wednesday the discussion on the 
data sheet was continued, and, as an aid to simplifying 
this and providing for uniformity in the replies, a com- 
plete classification of signal operations was prepared. 
This provided tentative plans for expressing signal ef- 
ficiency which would serve as a basis for comparing the 
data that would be obtained through the use of the pro- 
posed data-sheet. A proposed outline of information 
that should be supplied when requesting quotations upon 
new signal installations for interurban lines was also 
discussed, and changes were made in the standard clear- 
ance diagram for semaphore signals that had been sub- 
mitted at the 1914 convention and referred back to the 
committee. 



CLAIMS ASSOCIATION EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

A meeting of the executive committee of the Claims 
association was held in Washington on Jan. 29. Those 
present were: W. Tichenor, Indianapolis, Ind., presi- 
dent; R. E. MacDougall, Rochester, N. Y., vice-presi- 
dent; S. B. Hare, Altoona, Pa., vice-president; B. B. 
Davis, Columbus, Ohio, secretary-treasurer; P. C. 
Nickel, New York, N. Y., and Wallace Muir, Lexington, 
Ky. A list of subjects for the 1915 meeting was pre- 
pared as follows : A card index and what it means ; 
safety and its relation to conservation; motor vehicles 
(details to be announced) ; standard classification of ac- 
cidents. The committee on the last-named subject con- 
sists of Messrs. Nickel, H. K. Bennett and H. V. Drown, 
of whom Mr. Drown is a recent addition. The authors 
of papers are to be selected by the president and 
the secretary. 



POWER DISTRIBUTION 

The sub-committee of the committee on "power distri- 
bution, to which had been assigned the preparation of 
standard specifications for overhead line material, met 
in New York on Jan. 28. There were present C. R. 
Harte, New Haven, chairman; C. L. Cadle, Rochester; 
C. F. Woods, Boston, and G. W. Palmer, Boston. The 
sub-committee discussed in detail the possible schemes 
for grouping the different specifications for various 
parts of overhead construction so that they might be 
most easily available for use in permanent form, and a 
schedule covering the scope of the work was prepared. 
Tentative general specifications for material had been 
prepared by Mr. Harte and these were considered in 



detail by the sub-committee as a whole and approved 
with certain modifications. Detailed specifications for 
wrought iron and steel were then taken up, together 
with requirements for such parts of the usual types of 
overhead construction as are made wholly of these ma- 
terials and which, in consequence, fall naturally under 
this general heading. This subject was extended into 
an evening session without being completed and it was 
decided to hold another meeting of the sub-committee on 
Feb. 25, the meeting to be carried over to the following 
day if necessary. 



COMMITTEE ON STANDARD CLASSIFICATION 
OF ACCOUNTS 

A meeting of the committee on a standard classifica- 
tion of accounts of the American Electric Railway Ac- 
countants' Association was held in Washington on Jan. 
27 and 28. Those in attendance were: H. L. Wilson, 
Boston; W. F. Ham, Washington, D. C; R. N. Wallis, 
Fitchburg, Mass., and W. H. Forse, Jr., Anderson, 
Ind., representing the Accountants' Association, and 
F. W. Sweeney and George Geekie, representing the 
Interstate Commerce Commission. These gentlemen 
spent two days in preparing the manuscript of a case 
book, based on the new classification. This book will 
publish all of the questions in the old case book and 
will apply them to the new classification. There will 
also be some two hundred additional questions in re- 
gard to the classification of accounts, which will be 
answered according to the basis of the new classifica- 
tions. The case book will carry a complete index both 
of subjects and case numbers. The manuscript of this 
book was completed at the meeting of the committee 
in Washington and it will be issued by the government 
as soon as it can be printed at the Government Print- 
ing Ofl^ice. 



DENVER TRAMWAY SECTION 

The January meeting of the Denver Tramway Com- 
pany Section was held on Jan. 28, having been postponed 
from Jan. 21, the regular meeting date. The subject 
for the meeting was "Snow Work and Equipment," the 
principal paper being presented by W. H. McAloney, su- 
perintendent of rolling stock. This was discussed by 
J. M. Tierney, W. L. Whitlock, A. M. Evans, J. J. Fos- 
ter, A. J. Krick and R. L. Baker. Mr. McAloney used a 
large number of lantern slides to illustrate his talk, in 
which the audience of 200 was intensely interested. 
Preceding the formal part of the program the Central 
Tramway Glee Club gave a brief entertainment. 



COMING COMMITTEE MEETINGS 

Feb. 11, New York, 10 a. m., standards committee of 
the Transportation & Traffic Association, L. H. Palmer, 
Harrison Williams Company, New York, chairman. 

Feb. 11, New York, 10 a. m., rules committee of the 
Transportation & Traffic Association, W. H. Collins, 
general manager Johnstown & Gloversville Railroad 
Company, Gloversville, N. Y., chairman. 

A meeting of the committee on way matters of the 
Engineering Association, C. S. Kimball, engineer 
maintenance of way Washington Railway & Electric 
Company, Washington, D. C, chairman, will probably 
be held in New York before the end of February. 



294 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 6 



Equipment and Its Maintenance 

Short Descriptions of Labor, Mechanical and Electrical 
Practices in Every Department of Electric Railroading 

(ContributioTis from the Men in the Field Are Solicited and Will be Paid for at Special Rates.) 



Electrolysis Develops Defects in But Three Case- Hardened Collar and Welding Re- 
Out of 1500 Concrete Poles claim Worn Button-End Axles 



BY H. G. THROOP, SUPERINTENDENT LINE AND BUILDINGS 
NEW YORK STATE RAILWAYS, UTICA-SYRACUSE LINES 

Several articles have been published dealing with 
the effect of stray electric current upon concrete poles. 
A recital of our experiences in this line may be of 
some benefit to users of this type of pole. 

Out of a total installation of some 1500 reinforced 
concrete poles placed during the last five years, three 
poles have developed defects, which, upon investiga- 
tion, proved to be directly traceable to the flow of 
current through the reinforcing rods to the ground. 

The first case was indicated by a vertical crack ex- 
tending from the top of the pole to the ground line, 
from one of the corner reinforcing rods to the surface 
of the concrete. This pole was one of the first built 
and was installed in the spring of 1911 and removed 
in December, 1914. Evidently there had been a lealc- 
age of current into this pole for some time, due to a 
defective strain insulator in the span wire, the current 
flowing from the eyebolt into one of the corner rein- 
forcing rods, thence to ground. When the concrete was 
removed from the reinforcement of this pole, the rod 
in contact with the eyebolt was badly oxidized, and 
below the ground line some 2 ft. of this rod was entirely 
eaten away. Within the portion of the pole which was 
buried in the ground the current had communicated 
through the damp concrete to the other rods, which 
were all badly oxidized. The concrete above the ground 
line had been so loosened from the oxidized rod that 
this concrete would in time have fallen away from the 
rod. 

The second case was that of an extra heavy 8-in. 
top corner pole, into which there had been a gradual 
leakage of current. This leakage resulted in the spall- 
ing of the concrete below the ground line to such an 
extent that the grip of the concrete on the reinforce- 
ment was badly weakened. Due to its weakened condi- 
tion this pole had been pulled 1 ft. out of line by the 
trolley pole of a passing car catching into the attached 
curve. 

The third case showed spalling of the concrete below 
the ground line, but had not resulted in failure when 
the pole was removed for other reasons. 

Conclusions 

All of the foregoing cases of failure were due to 
leakage of 600-volt trolley current through defective 
hangers and strain insulators. 

The evident remedy for the conditions cited is to 
insulate the pole completely by placing in the spans the 
proper strain insulators. Poles removed for other 
causes than defects have been knocked to pieces and 
all of their rods have been found to be in perfect con- 
dition. 

In favor of this type of pole it may be stated that 
in all of the foregoing cases ample warning was given 
by the gradual spalling and cracking of the concrete, 
?nd all of the poles mentioned would have supported 
their load in safety for some time after the defects 
were detected. 



BY A. R. JOHNSON, ASSISTANT TO SUPERINTENDENT OF 
EQUIPMENT THIRD AVENUE RAILWAY SYSTEM, NEW YORK 

Some two or three years ago the Third Avenue Rail- 
way System had much trouble from broken check plates 
on the No. 22-E trucks used on lines in the outlying 
districts. This trouble was entirely overcome by sub- 
stituting a check plate made of manganese bronze, but 






No. 1 No. 2 No. 3 

FIG. 1 — WORN, WELDED AND FINISHED AXLES OF THIRD 



AVENUE RAILWAY SYSTEM 



J 



Worn Check Plofe 
Groove 



Chamfered 



End of Axle turned down to 
receive Collar 



,,£ - Chamfered and 
- r Welded 



Collar attached 
to Axle 

FIG. 2 — STFPS IN APPLICATION OF CASE-HARDENED COLLAR 
TO A WELD-REPAIRED AXLE 




FIG. 3 — DETAILS OF CASE-HARDENED 
COLLAR AS APPLIED TO PONY AXLE 



— 1 V<t{{f^ 



'32 
-1^' 

I IS? 



it was then found that the hard wearing qualities of 
that material caused much wear in the check plate 
grooves on the axles. In fact, a number of them wore 
to a knife edge, as shown in No. 1 of the accompanying 
half-tone. Fig. 1. 

To save the axles from the scrap pile we used our 
electric welding plant to fill in the grooves, as indicated 
by No. 2 of Fig. 1, and then turned the axles down, as 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



295 



shown by No. 3 of Fig. 1. While this treatment added 
to the life of the axles, the welded material also wore 
off in time. The question of reclaiming these axles, 
therefore, came up a second time with the result that 
we decided to try the scheme of attaching a case- 
hardened collar on the end of the axles, as shown in 
Figs. 2 and 3. This collar consists of a piece of steel 
which is case-hardened to a depth of 1/16 in. in the 
grooved part only. The axle is turned down at the end 
for a distance of ly in. and chamfered for 3/16 in. 
at the extreme end. The collar is arranged for a driv- 
ing fit. The outer end of the collar, as shown in Fig. 
3, is also chamfered to permit filling in the welding ma- 
terial to insure rigidity and to prevent the collar from 
turning on the axle. 

Up to the present time the practice described has 
been in an experimental stage, but the results so far 
obtained have proved very satisfactory. One car on 
which this collar was applied to the axle had made 
more than 3000 miles in hard service up to Feb. 1 of 
the current year and still showed no sign of wear or 
other possible defects. 



Trolley Wire Pick-Up 

BY HARRY BRANSON, SUPERINTENDENT OF EQUIPMENT 
LEHIGH VALLEY TRANSIT COMPANY, ALLENTOWN, PA. 

All cars of the Lehigh Valley Transit Company are 
now being equipped with trolley wire pick-ups designed 
to handle dropped trolley wires without danger. The ac- 
companying halftone shows this device in its case on 
the right, while on the left it is shown ready for use 
in an emergency. 

The instrument consists of a well-seasoned staff of ash 
about 18 in. long and IY2 in. thick with a casting mount- 
ed on one end to which a lever is pivoted, as shown. On 
the long end of this lever is fastened about 50 ft. of 
%-in. rope which passes through a slanting hole in the 
center of the rod. The top of the casting, which is made 
with a corrugated curved groove, is inserted under the 




TROLLEY WIRE PICK-UP READY FOR USE AND PACKED IN 
BOX FOR INSTALLATION IN CAR 

wire. A pull on the rope will then exerl through the 
lever a firm grip on the wire. The loose end of the rope 
is thrown over the limb of a tree or other support, the 
wire is drawn up from the ground and the rope fastened. 
The car may then continue its run without waiting for 
repairs to be made to the overhead line. 

The pick-up is stored in a pine box fitted with a glass 
cover. This box is mounted either under a seat in the 
car or near the roof in one of the vestibules. The glass 
must be broken to get hold of the pick-up just as in the 
case of axes for emergency use. 



Pine Ties Reused by Street Railway After 
Twenty-One Years' Service 

BY R. C. CRAM, ASSISTANT ENGINEER WAY AND STRUC- 
TURE BROOKLYN RAPID TRANSIT SYSTEM 

The average life of the several kinds of untreated 
ties generally used in steam railroad track structures 
is now quite well determined. On the other hand, in- 
formation concerning the life of ties in electric rail- 
way service in paved streets is somewhat meager. The 
conditions governing the two forms of service differ 
so much that those obtaining in steam railroad service 
cannot be taken as a guide for electric railway service 
in streets, and even, to some extent, in private right- 
of-way. 

The ties in steam railroad service are constantly ex- 
posed to alternate variable wet and dry conditions; 
they are subject to very heavy stresses due to the great 
weight of the steam railroad equipment; they are sub- 
ject to mechanical injury from more or less constant 
tamping. On the other hand, those in the street railway 
service are usually in a comparatively uniform state 
with respect to variation in moisture content, owing 
to the protection from evaporation afforded by the 
paving; they are subject to much lighter loads, and 
are seldom retamped after their installation. It is con- 
ceded that the life of tie timber is greatly increased 
under the latter conditions. 

The character of the soils in streets may affect the 
life of the ties to a considerable extent, but the increas- 
ing use of concrete in the track structure undoubtedly 
helps to preserve ties against decay, providing fungi 
or fermentation are not present at the time of installa- 
tion, and should offset variable soil action and add mate- 
rially to the ultimate life obtained. 

Fred G. Simmons, then superintendent of construc- 
tion. The Milwaukee Electric Railway & Light Com- 
pany, stated at the 1906 convention of the American 
Street & Interurban Railway Engineering Association 
that he had taken up tracks laid with red-cedar ties 
which were from sixteen to eighteen years old and that 
he was putting back between 40 per cent and 60 per 
cent of them into the tracks, surrounding them with 
concrete. 

Tie Life in Brooklyn 

The reconstruction of surface tracks carried out in 
Brooklyn during the past season afforded an oppor- 
tunity to investigate this subject. Observation was 
made covering nine different streets in widely separated 
territory involving altogether about 15 miles of single 
track. 

The tracks removed were constructed almost uni- 
formly with 9-in. tram girder rail, having a base 5V2 
in. wide, spiked to 6 in. x 8 in. x 7 ft. sawed long-leaf 
yellow pine ties spaced 2 ft. 6 in. on centers, with 
brace tieplates spaced from 6 ft. to 8 ft. apart. In 
every case the tracks were paved and had been since 
construction, mostly with 8-in. deep granite blocks laid 
on sand, with sand joints. In three of the streets the 
original pavement had been replaced within the last six 
or seven years with an improved type, involving the 
use of the same blocks laid with grouted joints on 
cinder concrete. 

No attempt was made to count the old ties removed, 
but careful check was made on the average spacing. 
The estimated number of ties removed was found to 
be about 33,000. Upon arrival at the storage yard the 
ties were counted and selected for use as second-hand 
stock, being later reissued and used, in some cases, in 
rehabilitated tracks where old rails were left in place 
and new grouted pavement was being installed. 



296 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[VOL. XLV, No. 6 



The count at the yard showed that there was an 
average loss of about 24 per cent of the estimated num- 
ber of ties between the street and the yard. In one 
or two instances the losses were so high that, consid- 
ering the neighborhoods, they could only be accounted 
for as being due to their being appropriated for fire- 
wood. It is also patent that a fair number were de- 
stroyed in removal and went direct to dumps in the 
clean-up. 

However, the interesting features are that the aver- 
age age of the ties taken into stock was 18.6 years ; that 
72 per cent of the ties which were sorted were taken 
into stock, representing 54 per cent of the estimated 
total number removed from the street; that the ages 
ranged from sixteen to twenty-one years; and that 
in one case 94 per cent of ties sixteen years old which 
were sorted went into stock, or 82 per cent of the 
estimated original number in that street. 

When all the features are considered it seems rea- 
sonably safe to assume that at least 60 per cent of the 
total number of ties would have been fit for stock if 
all of them could have been recovered. It was also 
observed that as a rule there was comparatively little 
damage to the ties due to rail cutting, especially when 
the 5y2-in. base and old tie spacing are borne in mind. 




Top of Block 






Section A-A Bolt Forged and 

Kcudy to Tbreud 
JSUetria R]/.jQtirnal 

FORMING BLOCK FOR GE-57 
MOTOR BOLTS 



Preventing Condensation in Under-Water 
Conduit 

BY J. G. KOPPEL, ELECTRICAL SUPERINTENDENT OF BRIDGES, 
SAULT STE. MARIE, MICH. 

The accompanying illustration shows a 6-in. cast-iron 
power cable conduit which is laid under a canal. It 
was found that a large amount of water had accumu- 
lated in this conduit from the condensation of entering 
air. This water does no damage so long as the lead 



Handy Forming Blocks for GE-57 Motors 

BY J. N. GRAHAM, MASTER MECHANIC ROCKFORD & IN- 
TERURBAN RAILWAY, ROCKFORD, ILL. 

During the cold weather we have had much trouble 
from the breakage of steel motor bolts. Such failures 
allow the motor case to drop and, worse than that, the 
armature occasionally will fall on the pole pieces. To 
overcome this we had lately been making these bolts 
from 1%-in. square Swedish or Farnley iron, both of 
which brands are very costly. Further, with the usual 

methods of operation much 
material was lost in turning 
these bolts from the square 
iron and much time was re- 
quired, thus making the 
bolts very expensive. 

To make such bolts at 
a lower cost we now use a 
block made from a piece 
of an old steel axle in which 
the bolts can be forged 
from round bars of the 
tough steels named at a 
big saving in material and 
time. The block, as illus- 
trated, is easily made as 
follows : First cut off a 
piece of an old axle a little 
longer than the length of 
the bolt over the head, then 
face off both ends in a lathe to the exact length of the 
bolt over the head. Next allow the block to remain in 
the lathe for a 1 1 /32-in. drilling of its full length. After 
drilling the block counterbore for the round shoulder on 
the head of the bolt. Then take the block from the lathe 
and chisel it out to receive the square part of the bolt 
head. The block is then ready for use. Place it on an 
anvil or forming block, heat one end of the 1-in. round 
iron of which the bolt is to be made, drop it in the 
block with the cool end down, sledge the hot end down 
to form the head of the bolt, drive the bolt out of the 
block as soon as it is formed and allow it to cool slowly. 
Never cool in water. When cool the bolt is ready for 
threading. 




Etectrir /T^.JwuDiai 



UNDER-WATER CONDUIT SEALED WITH ASPHALT-BITUMEN 
TO AVOID CONDENSATION 

covering of the cable stays in good shape, but if the 
lead sheathing is damaged a little, as when the cable 
is pulled through the conduit, water becomes very 
troublesome. 

To stop condensation we now seal the conduit ends 
with asphalt-bitumen. About 12 in. from the end of 
the conduit we insert a piece of clean waste to keep 
the bitumen from running too far down the conduit. 
The material is hot-poured and the end of the conduit 
is sealed neatly to make a good-looking job. 



Accident Reduction on the Third Avenue 
Railway System 

The following table shows a number of boarding and 
alighting accidents and settlements for same for 1913 
and 1914 for the Third Avenue division of the Third 
Avenue Railway. This includes the Third Avenue road 
proper, 125th Street line and the Kingsbridge line. 

Table Showing Accidents and Settlements on Third Avenue 
Division 

, 1913. Old Style Cars— ^ ^1914. New Type Cars— < 

,— Boarding^ ^Alighting-^ ^BoardlnK^ ,-Alight!ng-> 
Acci- Settle- Acci- Settle- Acci- Settle- Acci- Settle- 
dents ments dents merits dents ments dents ments 

Sept 70 $1,245 33 $892 14 $235 30 $360 

Oct 100 1,790 34 1,335 14 75 41 375 

Mov 72 2,412 47 1,300 17 80 31 235 

Dec 97 1,370 48 2,140 19 61 38 140 

Totals 339 $6,817 162 $5,667 64 $451 140 $1,110 

De'creifs^e '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'...■■.■■..■■■■■■■■■ 275 $6,366 22 $4,557 

The division mentioned was equipped throughout with 
the folding door and step device of the Prepayment Car 
Sales Company in August, 1914, and the railway com- 
pany attributes the reduction in the number and serious 
character of the boarding and alighting accidents en- 
tirely to this improvement. It will be noticed the num- 
ber of boarding accidents decreased 275 and the alight- 
ing accidents 22, the whole reduction in settlements 
being $10,923, or about 88 per cent. 



February G, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



297 



Experience with Malleable Iron Cross- 
Arms on Wooden Poles 

Late in the year 1908 the New York State Railways- 
liochester Lines, on what was then known as the Roches- 
ter & Sodus Bay Railway, superseded the long-leaf yel- 
low pine cross-arms with steel-iron arms. The first in- 
stallations were made on lines up to 13,000 volts, but 
since then the same construction has been applied to 
transmission lines as high as 20,000 volts. In all cases 
the lines are carried on cedar, chestnut or concrete 
poles. 

The wooden cross-arms cost only 35 cents each, but 
as their life did not extend beyond five years it was 
necessary to replace them at a cost of $1 per arm for 
labor alone. To eliminate this maintenance cost for 
good, C. L. Cadle, electrical en- 
gineer of the company, decided to 
try steel-iron cross-arms. While 
these arms cost 76 cents each as 
compared with 35 cents for wood, 
they are far cheaper in the end be- 
cause they will last as long as the 
pole. Thus, for a pole life of fifteen 
years the cost of wooden arms is 
$4.05 and that of steel $1.76. These 
angle-iron arms are purchased un- 
der a specification which calls for 
hot galvanizing after the holes have been drilled, thus 
avoiding the possibility of rust. The company buys the 
arms in the open market, but quite a portion of those 
now in service came from the Archbold-Brady Com- 
pany, Syracuse, N. Y. Two constructions of this char- 
acter, one for single-line 13,000-volt and one for double- 
line 20,000-volt service, are shown in accompanying 
drawings. It should be understood that the braces and 
other fittings used with the steel arms do not differ to 
any degree in character or price from those which were 
used with wooden arms. 
The only point of importance which came up after the 




" Bolt Bpllt irltb 
Chisel 
EUetrU Ry-Jourtuil 

SAWED AND SPLIT 
BOLT 



Before the bolts are taken to the field, they are hack- 
sawed for % in. to % in. on that portion which will 
come below the nut. Then after the nuts have been 
applied on the job the sawed portion is split with a cold 
chisel just enough to prevent the bolt from losing its 
spring while assuring enough expansion to give the 
effect of a locknut. In fact, while the nut cannot work 
ofT of its own accord, it can readily be unscrewed by the 
lineman for use somewhere else, and of course there is 
no other part to remove first, as would be necessary in 
cotter-key fastenings. 



Front Exit Glasgow Double-Deck Car With 
Folding Step 

The Glasgow Corporation Tramways has recently 
added to its rolling stock a double-deck car, the chief 
features of which are a front exit for inside passengers 
and a new design and arrangement of the upper-deck 




Sleetrie Ry.Joumal 

PLAN OF UPPER DECK OF CAR, SHOWING REVOLVING SEATS 

seats. The car body and platform are built to the 
standard design adopted by the tramways committee 
many years ago. The length of the car body is 17 ft. 
and the length of each platform is 6 ft. 

In the original design the top of the stair is fitted 
hard against the car body, leaving accommodation at 
the foot of the stair for placing the controller close up 
to the dashboard. In the new design, the stair is moved 
away from the body of the car, in order to provide the 
necessary headroom between itself and the car body, 
free access being obtained at the foot of the stair by 




I12Kx 2^^x9 3 Galv.Aiiglelron 
] 2K X 2!.i'x e's" " 
:i}i"5 Wx2'T!i" ■• Iron Brace Bod 
JNo.27 Locke Insulator Tins 



'/l« I 2X Wide 
Rldgclron 



Section Section 
at A-A St E-B 



Bequircd 

2«'x 2H"i H'Oal.Iron Angles 
11K"x^"x20" " " Brace Bods 
s/'iG x2?4" " " Eidse Irons 
I i yQ.27"Loc!tc'lnsulator Pins 




£l*otrie Ri/.Journal 



STANDARD FIXTURE LAYOUTS FOR DOUBLE LINES UP TO 20,000 VOLTS AND FOR SINGLE LINES UP TO 13,000 VOLTS 



first change-overs were made was how to prevent the 
nuts from working off of the pins. First, the company 
tried a spring washer at the bottom of the nut, but the 
nut would back off from the washer. Next a cotter key 
was tried, but in this construction the nut eventually 
wore the key in two. Finally, about three years ago, 
the following scheme, which has cured the trouble en- 
tirely, was devised: 



moving the controller about 20 in. away from the dash- 
board. The hand-brake staff is placed at the extreme 
end of the platform, and a vertical wheel with suitable 
bevel gearing and folding handle has been introduced in 
place of the ordinary spindle brake. 

The hinged exit gate is geared to the folding step in 
such a manner that when the gate is open the step is 
lowered, and when the gate is closed the step is raised. 



298 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 6 



The arrangement of the top seats, as shown on the 
plan, was introduced in order to increase the passage- 
way up the center of the car and at the same time to pro- 
vide a more comfortable seat. By this arrangement, 
each passenger is provided with an independent chair, 
with a back rest, mounted on a pivot, so that the chairs 




■GLASGOW DOUBLE-DECK CAR WITH HINGED EXIT GATE AND 
FOLDING STEP 

can be turned to suit the direction in which the car is 
traveling. Each pair of seats is set at such an angle 
that the shoulder of one passenger overlaps the shoulder 
of the passenger occupying the next seat. 

On account of the new position of the stair, it was 
necessary to increase the length of the upper dashboard 




PAIRS OF PIVOTED SEATS ON UPPER DECK OF GLASGOW CAR ; 
NOTE ALSO ABSENCE OF HEADLINING 

or wind screen, the effect of which has been to increase 
the seating capacity under the canopy at each end of 
the car by one passenger. The seating capacity of the 
original type of car is sixty-two and in the new car 
sixty-four. 



Local and interurban railways in Cleveland found 
operation difficult on Feb. 1, because of sleet on the 
trolley wires and tracks and numerous broken wires 
Reports from Toledo indicate that similar difficulty 
was encountered on Feb. 1 and 2. Because of broken 
trolley wires power was shut off at the plant of the 
Lake Shore Electric Railway at Fremont and for a 
time operation of cars between that point and Toledo 
was suspended. 



Curtain Fixtures Without Pinch Handles 

The Dayton Manufacturing Company, Dayton, Ohio, 
has recently brought out an improved car curtain fixture 
in which friction shoes bearing in the curtain grooves 
hold the curtain absolutely at any position. These shoes 
are pivoted at the ends of spring-pressed plungers, and 
they will not bind in the curtain grooves, even if the 
lower edge of the curtain is slanted at an unusual angle. 





II 

1 i 



SHOE EASILY REMOVED FROM GROOVE WHEN NECESSARY 

The bottom rod may be grasped at any point with either 
hand and the curtain raised or lowered smoothly and 
easily. No pinch handles are necessary. 

It is asserted that no matter how rapidly or how 
roughly the curtain may be operated, the tips cannot be 
jerked from the grooves, as a metal retaining strip, 
fastened to the window casing along the edge of each 
groove, effectually prevents the accidental displacement 




J 



RETAINING STRIP PREVENTS ACCIDENTAL MISPI^ACEMEN' 



of the shoes. The tendency of the tips of other types 
of curtain to leave the grooves if the finger pieces are i 
pressed too strongly, or if the curtain is raised or low- 
ered too rapidly, is a source of much annoyance to pas- 
sengers and what is more apparent, of considerable dam- 
age to the curtain and the finish of the window casing. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



299 



The retaining strips, while keeping the shoes in the 
-rooves under all conditions of operation, do not inter- 
re with the ready removal of the curtain when neces- 
sary. Each strip terminates 1% in. below the upper end 
)f its groove and the friction shoe may be tilted and 
withdrawn through this opening. However, the shoe is 
nearly twice as long as this opening and it will not slide 
lit under use. The removal of the curtain must be in- 
. iitional, in which case it is easily and quickly effected. 
The simplicity of this curtain fixture is apparent from 
lie accompanying sectional view. The lower edge of 
■le curtain is formed by a steel tube, in either end of 
hich slides a brass plunger with its shoe. Adjustment 
: the spring tension and for different widths of win- 
dow is obtained by screwing this plunger in or out as 
required, the threaded end of the plunger engaging a 
ng bronze nut, as shown. As the shoes do not extend 



This company's curtains will be regularly made from 
"Fabrikoid," a durable curtain material, which can be 
supplied in all shades, and in a wide variety of patterns, 
or to match any curtain material now in use. All cur- 
tains are fitted with metal rollers. 




DETAILS OF CURTAIN FIXTURE EXPOSED IN PART 



lar below the lower edge of the tube, a long apron is not 
required and this feature adds greatly to the durability 
of the fabric. 

The "Dayton" fixture does not require a special size 
of groove as it will operate equally well in the standard 
size groove, as also in the deeper, wider grooves re- 
quired by certain other types. This is of importance 
when fixtures are being specified for the remodeling of 
old cars. 

The retaining strips may be enameled to suit the color 
of the woodwork or they may be finished to match the 
other bronze trimmings of the car. 



Two-Way Dump Cars 

The "Universal" is the name of the modern two-way 
dump car built by the Universal Car & Manufacturing 
Company (Inc.), New York. With the exception of the 
cabs this car is constructed of rolled-steel sections and 
plates throughout, and it may be used either as a motor 
car or as a trailer. In trailer cars the cabs are usually 
omitted. The car dumps to either side and is operated 
entirely by hand power. As it is mounted on the under- 
frame by means of cast-steel rockers the car comes to 
its full angle with little or no shock, 
and it is easily righted when the 
load is discharged. The entire 
dumping and righting operation is 
performed within two minutes.. 

The doors open automatically 
when the car is dumping and, as 
illustrated, form an apron for the 
lading to pass over, thus throwing 
the load entirely free of the track. 
A spreader is also attached to the 
rear truck as a further aid in push- 
ing the material away from the 
track. The car may be dumped in 
an empty position and then loaded 
by hand and righted. This is a 
decided advantage as the lift from 
the roadway to the top side of the 
car is only 4 ft., which is easy for 
men using shovels. 
The car has four compartments, each of which may 
be dumped separately if so desired. The car may also 
be dumped in normal running position without tilting 
the body. When partitions are not wanted the com- 
pany substitutes a diaphragm only 4 in. high, thus 
allowing long material to be hauled. Any type of 
couplers may be used and, if desired, air brakes may 
be added. The body may also be mounted on the rail- 
way's standard trucks. 

Cars of this type are used on several of the largest 
electric railways in the United States, such as the Con- 
necticut Company, the Boston Elevated Railway, Cleve- 



1 


" flP f i f ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^H 




1 


i IrmBM^HHHi 


1^ 








^^^^^^^ 




■ 


E 


^^ ^^^^■■^^^55511 «! II 1 ^^ 


S5WW*-,- 



TWO-WAY DUMP CAR OF STEEL CONSTRUCTION EXCEPT CABS, AND MADE FOR MOTOR OR TRAILER WE 



300 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 6 



land Railway, Bangor Railway & Electric Company and 
the Public Service Railway. Charles H. Clark, engi- 
neer maintenance of way Cleveland Railway, estimates 
the earning power of one of these cars to his company 
as $100 a day. Since this car requires only the motor- 
man and conductor for unloading, its superiority to the 
old-time hand-loaded flat car is manifest. For example, 
it costs one Eastern system about $2 to unload one 
flat car. 

The principal data on a typical two-way dump car 
follow : 

Cubic capacity level full 15 cu. yd. 

Length over end sills 50 ft. 

Length inside box 25 ft. 

Width inside 8 ft. 

Height from top of rail to top of floor 5 ft. % in. 

Height from top of rail to top of side 6 ft. 1 % in. 

Truck centers 25 ft. 6 1/2 in. 

Height inside 25 in. 

Weight (without electrical equipment) 33,000 lb. 



Sand -Spreading Wagon for Slippery 
Pavement 

Officials of the Louisville, Ky., Railway have been 
watching the efforts of the Board of Public Works to 
improve the condition of the streets in the business sec- 
tion by means of a sand-spreading wagon. This wagon, 
which is made by the Havass Company, New York, N. Y., 
feeds sand through a revolving disk under the wagon 
bed. It can be adjusted to throw sand at any desired 
rate. It has been put to work on wood block and certain 
asphalted streets, the surface of which has been made 
very slippery by the continued cold weather. 

In the sections where this wagon has been put into 
service the railway has double tracks, which, of course, 
are affected by the same conditions that make the streets 
slippery. If the sand distributed by the city is of the 
right quality, dry and sharp, it will lessen the railway's 
own requirements for sand ; if it is a low grade of sand, 
the railway's "slick rail" troubles probably would be in- 
creased. However, the city is now using a sharp, clear 
river sand similar to that used by the railway, if for no 
other reason than that clayey, wet sand would not run 
through the new machine. 



Direct- Current Generator Capacity 

In an article in the Electric Journal, B. G. Lamme, 
chief engineer Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing 
Company, commented on direct-current generators as 
follows: The engine-type machine in its prime was a 
magnificent piece of apparatus. On account of its low 
speed, it was of comparatively large dimensions for a 
given output. In the largest capacity, low-speed engine- 
type generators, over-all dimensions of from 25 ft. to 
27 ft. were attained. However, these machines were 
midgets, both in size and capacity, alongside some of 
the a.c. engine-type generators at their maximum. The 
latter were constructed up to capacities of from 5000 
kw to 6000 kw compared with 3000 kw for direct cur- 
rent, while the engine-type alternators attained over-all 
diameters as high as 42 ft. Incidentally, as regards 
capacity alone, the race between alternators and d.c. 
machines has been very much one-sided, almost since 
the polyphase system became thoroughly commercial. 
The earliest Niagara generators (constructed in 1893), 
of 3750 kw were practjcally of as large capacity as the 
largest d.c. machine ever built; while in later polyphase 
work, generators of the usual multipolar construction 
have been built up to 17,000 kw and turbo-generators 
up to 30,000 and 35,000 kw. Obviously, as regards 
maximum capacity, the d.c. generator makes but a poor 
comparison, but this should in no way detract from the 
appreciation of this machine as an energizing accom- 
plishment. 



Electric Garment Dryer Conserves Health 
and Schedules 

For many years the Brooklyn Rapid Transit System 
has provided employees' clubrooms in which, among 
other conveniences, lockers and shower baths are in- 
stalled. Through its benefit association and medical 
inspe-ction service, however, the company found that 
these facilities were insufficient to ward off the ill- 
nesses that follow when men stay in wet clothing after 
coming in from a storm. Very few platform men would 
be likely to keep an extra suit of clothing at the club- 
rooms, nor is it convenient for them to go homa between 
runs for that purpose. 

To better this condition the company tried out nearly 
two years ago, an electric garment dryer of the style 
shown in the accompanying illustration. This device 
thoroughly dries wet clothing in the time that a man 
requires for a bath. The results in keeping men from 
becoming ill and so missing their runs, to say nothing 
of the comfort afforded, were so satisfactory that 
seven more dryers have now been installed by the com- 
pany at different stations. 

The dryers are made to fit any desired location. Their 
racks pull out individually, traveling on the floor, either 




ELECTRIC GARMENT DRYER IN SERVICE, ONE RACK DRAWN 
OUT TO SHOW HANGER 

inside or outside of the dryer. The construction is 
such, that each rack when pulled out its full length, 
closes the aperture, retaining the heat within the dryer 
and giving constant drying efficiency to the garments 
inside, while other racks are being loaded or removed. 

While the dryers are ordinarily 7 ft. long and about 
7 ft. 6 in. high, their dimensions may be varied to con- 
tain the necessary numbers of racks for the sizes of the 
crews, etc. Each rack is 16Vi in. wide, with a hanging 
capacity of five complete suits of underwear, linen and 
uniforms. The dryers have a double casing, insulated 
to prevent radiation of heat. In addition to the natural 
ventilation provided, added drying efficiency is obtained 
by forced draft circulation from a fan motor. 

The first use of these dryers in the connection de- 
scribed is to be credited to the Brooklyn Rapid Transit 
System, although different types have been in use for 
some years in various municipal fire and police depart- 
ment houses. They are available as conditions demand 
for heating by electricity, coal, gas or steam. These 
dryers are made by the Shannon Manufacturing Com- 
pany, New York, N. Y. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



301 



LONDON LETTER 



P. A. Y. E. Cars Successful in Aberdeen — Last of London 
Horse Tramways to Give Way to Electrified Lines 

(From Our Regular Correspondent) 
The annual return regarding tramways and light railways 
and trackless trolley undertakings issued by the Local Gov- 
ernment Board shows that since 1878 the route length of 
tramways and light railways on public roads open for traffic 
in the United Kingdom has increased from 269 to 2703 miles, 
the capital expenditure from £4,207,350 to £80,977,838, the 
number of passengers carried from 146,000,000 to 3,426,000,- 
000, and the net receipts from £230,956 to £5,628,321. Of the 
total of 1848 miles of line owned by local authorities, 1640 
miles are worked by those authorities themselves, or, in a 
few cases, by other local authorities leasing from them, and 
the remaining 208 miles by leasing companies. Last year 
. the route mileage worked by electric traction was 2546 miles 
out of a total of 2662. This year it is 2595 miles out of 
2703. Of the 279 undertakings, 171 belong to local authori- 
ties and 108 to companies or other parties. The net receipts 
of local authorities who work tramway undertakings belong- 
ing to them, or leased from other local authorities, amounted 
to £4,071,610. On the year's traffic £1,218,299 was required 
to pay interest or dividends on capital, and £120,039 for rent 
of leased lines. The sum of £1,371,263 was applied towards 
the reduction of tramway debt, and £589,886 for relief of 
rates, while £711,217 was carried to reserve and renewal 
funds. As regards the length of line open for public traffic, 
the London County Council system comes first with 146 1/6 
miles, then Glasgow with 103% (including depot connec- 
tions), while Manchester is credited with 78% and Liverpool 
with 64%. Among company undertakings the London 
United heads the list with 53% miles. 

The Halifax Town Council has decided to promote a bill in 
Parliament giving it power to spend about £120,000 on new 
tramway works. It is proposed to extend the tramways 
from Brighouse to the Huddersfield border via Rastrick, 
from Halifax and Elland, from West Vale to Stainland, 
and from Triangle to Ripponden; to run trolley vehicles and 
motor buses and to secure extension of the periods during 
which the corporation will have possession of the tramways 
it has constructed in the areas of other local authorities. 

[ The Halifax Corporation is also seeking powers to run trail 
cars and to deal with road maintenance in connection with 
the running of motor buses. The clause regarding the buses 
follows what has now become standard practice, namely, the 
corporation will pay to the road authority during the first 
three years %d. per car-mile run by the buses in the outside 
area. After three years, and at the end of every subsequent 
three years, the extra cost of road maintenance caused by 

! the running of the buses is to be ascertained, of which the 

I corporation will pay half, but in no case will this contribu- 
tion exceed %d. per car-mile run. Any grant made by the 

I Imperial Exchequer is to be taken into account. 

! Mr. Pilcher, the manager of the Aberdeen Corporation 
Tramways, has issued a report to the members of the tram- 
ways committee to refute the criticisms on P. A. Y. E. cars. 

' He states that the cars have been in operation on the Wood- 
side route for twenty months, Beach route ten months, Torry 

; route seven months, and Mannofield route four months — 
practically half the system now being operated. Generally 
speaking, he found that there was a considerable amount of 
criticism at first. From an administrative and operating 
point of view they have been an unqualified success. The 
number of accidents to persons attempting to board or alight 
from the ordinary cars while in motion, for twelve months 

^ ended Dec. 1, 1914, was 87, all of which platform accidents 

; would either have been prevented or greatly minimized on 
P. A. Y. E. cars. Most of these occurred while the conductor 

' was engaged inside or on top collecting fares. It very rarely 

' happens that a serious platform accident occurs on a 
P. A. Y. E. car, as the conductor is always present to prevent 
it. It is interesting to note also that nearly all the conduc- 
tors and motormen are in favor of the P. A. Y. E. cars. 
For a considerable period the London County Council and 

>. the Stepney Borough Council have been at variance over the 
system on which the tramway between South Hackney and 
the Docks (by way of Grove Road and Burdett Road) should 
be electrified. The County Council wanted to install the 



overhead system; the Stepney Council insisted upon the 
conduit. The result has been that the old horse cars have 
ceased to run, and this important route is now without 
trams, though not without motor buses. Recently the need 
for reconstructing the tramway became urgent, and the 
County Council undertook to reconstruct the existing tram- 
ways for horse traction, but in such a way that they would 
be suitable for electrification at some future date, on the 
overhead trolley system. Against this the Stepney Council 
entered a protest. Now it has been asked by the Board of 
Trade if it has any further observations to offer on the plans 
furnished by the London County Council. At the same time, 
the board states that it is not prepared to withhold consent 
from the proposals of the County Council on the ground 
that that authority does not propose to renew the lines in 
such a way as to facilitate their equipment for electric 
traction on the overhead trolley system. The board trans- 
mitted copy of a communication from the Poplar Borough 
Council, showing that the Borough Councils of Poplar, Beth- 
nal Green and Hackney have agreed to the overhead system 
and are anxious that the Stepney Council should withdraw 
its opposition. The works committee of the Stepney Bor- 
ough Council has now replied to the Board of Trade that it 
has no further observations to offer except that it is doubtful 
whether any appurtenances purely germane to the overhead 
trolley system can be provided by the London County Coun- 
cil in the absence of the consent of the Borough Council. 
In other words, the deadlock continues. 

The last of the horse tramways in London are shortly to be 
removed as the London County Council has sanctioned the 
expenditure of £22,000 for the widening of certain ro:ids 
preparatory to electrifying the horse tramway at present 
running from Tower Bridge Road to Rotherhithe. The total 
cost of electrifying this route, which is about 27 miles in 
length, will be £74,700, apart from the cost of street widen- 
ings, the track work alone costing £62,500. The new tram- 
ways will be constructed on the conduit system, thus en- 
abling through service in connection with the other routes 
linking up with both ends of this branch. The reconstruction 
of this route has been before the London County Council 
and the Bermondsey Borough Council for several years, the 
difficulty being that the London County Council favored the 
overhead system, while the Bermondsey authority refused to 
consider any other than the conduit system. After several 
interviews between representatives of the two bodies con- 
cerned, the London County Council yielded. 

London is to have a second bill promoted in Parliament 
at the next session with a view to supplying electrical energy 
in an area comprising the Administrative County of London 
and adjacent areas. It will be in substitution for the London 
County Council bill, a few particulars of which were pub- 
lished last month. This second bill is promoted by a few 
of the London electric lighting companies, and the preamble 
states that electrical energy is now supplied to the County 
of London by a number of companies and local authorities, 
and that the existing conditions are unfavorable for the best 
economy. It states also that electrical energy can be sup- 
plied more effectively and economically from one combined 
undertaking, and that the existing undertakings in the area 
should be consolidated. The bill, therefore, proposes to in- 
corporate a company with a share capital of £6,000,000 and a 
loan capital of £2,000,000 "for the purpose of consolidating, 
unifying and improving the generation and distribution of 
electrical energy for all purposes in the area of supply as 
defined by the act, and of utilizing to the best economical 
advantage all existing means of generation and distribution 
of electrical energy within the area, with a view to the ulti- 
mate provision within the area of one system of supply of 
electrical energy with concentrated generation and standard- 
ized distribution." The companies proposed to be trans- 
ferred to the new statutory company are the Charing Cross. 
West End & City Electricity Supply Company, Ltd., the 
Brompton & Kensington Electricity Supply Company, Ltd., 
the Central Electric Supply Company, Ltd., the Chelsea 
Electricity Supply Company, Ltd., the Kensington & 
Knightsbridge Electric Lighting Company, Ltd., the London 
Electric Supply Corporation, Ltd., the Metropolitan Electric 
Supply Company, Ltd., the Netting Hill Electric Lighting 
Company, Ltd., the St. James & Pall Mall Electric Company, 
Ltd., and the Westminster Electric Supply Corporation, Ltd. 

A. C. S. 



302 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 6 



News of Electric Railways 



BUFFALO-NIAGARA FALLS LINE 

Project Involving Expenditure of Several Million Dollars 
Approved by Commission 

The Public Service Commission of the Second District of 
Nevsf York has granted the International Railway permission 
to build its proposed high-speed electric line between 
Buffalo and Niagara Falls over private right-of-way, and 
has authorized an issue of the company's 3 per cent fifty- 
year refunding and improvement mortgage bonds to the 
amount of $2,395,000, to be sold at not less than 87, netting 
a little more than $2,000,000 to pay for the new line. 

The new line will start on Main Street, Buffalo, at the 
intersection with the Buffalo & Lockport line of the In- 
ternational Railway, and run northwesterly out of Buffalo 
to Tonawanda, through Tonawanda over the old Buffalo, 
Thousand Islands & Portland Railroad line, through North 
Tonawanda, the town of Wheatfield, village of La Salle 
and into the city of Niagara Falls to Portage Road and 
over Portage Road to Niagara Street. 

Included in the cost of the new line is provision for the 
purchase of sixteen new 52-ft. steel underframe interurban 
cars, substations at Payne Avenue and Niagara Falls, a 
carhouse at Niagara Falls, stations at La Salle, Division 
Street and Tonawanda, waiting rooms at Main and Erie 
Streets and at Payne Avenue, and a shelter house at Ward's 
Road. It is provided that the new line shall cross the New 
York Central tracks by an overhead bridge, and bridges 
are provided for over Mill Creek, Ellicott Creek, State Ditch, 
Tonawanda Creek, Cayuga Creek, Gill Creek and the Grat- 
wick Trestle. 

The right-of-way and real estate are to cost $800,000, 
as detailed in the report of H. F. Riesinger; bridges and 
culverts, $240,500; substation equipment, $78,700; buildings, 
$109,850; rolling stock, $160,000; track line and grading, 
etc., $127,837. 



PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION INQUIRY 

New York Legislative Committee Begins Inquiry into 

Practices of First District Commission — Secretary 

Whitney Testifies 

The taking of testimony by the legislative committee ap- 
pointed to inquire into the workings of the Public Service 
Commissions of New York was begun in New York City on 
Jan. 30. Travis H. Whitney, secretary of the commission 
for the first district since its creation in 1907, explained 
the routine of the organization. Starting with 403 em- 
ployees with salaries of $724,216 in 1907, the commission 
last year had 2097 employees, with salaries of $2,903,321 and 
expenses of $2,971,000. The increase was attributed to the 
building of the new subway system. The commission had 
twelve lawyers on its staff, but spent $57,825 for special 
counsel since 1907. Some of the questions were directed 
toward ascertaining the qualification for office of Joseph 
Johnson, head of the transit inspection bureau of the com- 
mission, former fire commissioner of New York and cam- 
paign manager for Judge McCall, chairman of the com- 
mission, when the latter ran for Mayor. 

The history of the now famous wheel-guard case in con- 
nection with which William R. Willcox, former chairman 
of the commission, was held in contempt of court, was re- 
viewed. Mr. Whitney said that the policy of the commission 
in regard to pressing suits to require compliance with its 
orders had been influenced very largely by the outcome 
of several of the early actions brought by the commission. 
In one of them the commission was awarded only $1 dam- 
ages and it did not appeal, while in another action by the 
commission to compel respect for its orders the judge dis- 
missed the complaint. 

At the hearing on Feb. 1 it was brought out that corre- 
spondence in regard to informal complaints amounted to 
some twenty or thirty letters a day and that this was 
cared for by Mr. Whitney and George S. Daggett, the 
chief clerk. The complaints addressed to individual mem- 
bers of the commission went to such members. In the case 



of informal complaints no hearings were held and no orders 
issued. Citizens who made complaints usually wished to 
have them treated as informal ones, in order to obviate 
the necessity of having to testify at public hearings. Asked 
what supervision the commission exerted over this corre- 
spondence, Mr. Whitney said that Commissioner Woods, 
since taking office, had been applying to him for copies 
of complaints. Mr. Whitney said that it was the regular 
practice to hold conferences between the individual commis- 
sioners and officers of the public service corporations, but 
denied that informal complaints were often modified after 
such conferences. 

Mr. Daggett, who followed Mr. Whitney on the stand, was 
asked if some of the commissioners had not been displeased 
with his letters to some of the public service companies, and . 
if such displeasure had not been shown after the commis- 
sioners had consulted with officials of the companies. He 
replied that it might have been. Required by Mr. Haywood, 
counsel of the committee, to answer specifically, Mr. Daggett 
said, "On one or two occasions, yes." 

Mr. Haywood expressed himself on Feb. 2 as being well 
satisfied with the progress so far made in connection with 
the investigation. He said, however, that if the committee 
was to conclude its labors by Feb. 17 it would not be pos- 
sible to go thoroughly into all phases of the commission's 
work. Up to Feb. 2 no plans had been made for the in- 
vestigation of the commission for the second district. 



BRITISH TRAMWAYS AND THE WAR 

General Managers of Manchester and Glasgow Companies 

Report Effect of War Upon Finances and Number 

of Employees 

Mr. McElroy, the general manager of the Manchester 
Corporation Tramways, has submitted a report as to the 
effect of the war upon the finances of the department. Since 
the first four months of the war there has been a large 
decrease in the receipts, as compared with the previous year, 
and it is anticipated that at the end of the financial year the 
income will be £900,000, or £50,000 below the estimate. 
Notwithstanding the increased expenditure owing to allow- 
ances to the men who have joined the colors, and the en- 
gaging and training of a new staff, and the reduced revenue, 
Mr. McElroy considers that the tramways committee will, at 
the end of the year, be in a position to pay £100,000 in relief 
of the rates and place £50,000 to renewals, etc., fund, instead 
of the estimated £102,000. The report continues: 

"The number of men from the tramways department who 
up to this date have joined the colors is about one in 200, 
and the amount now allowed to them or their dependents is 
at the rate of £44,876 per annum. Our men are still leaving 
us daily to enlist. In addition to supplying so many men 
from our own department, we have assisted in the general 
recruiting campaign in Manchester by displaying striking 
posters in the tramcars, which, we are told, have had a good 
effect. The department has made an energetic effort to raise 
funds by means of collections in the tramcars. The weekly 
collections since the commencement have amounted to £5,827. 
The various bills and posters which have been placed in the 
cars in connection with these collections have cost the de- 
partment up to the present about £150, which equals 2% per 
cent on the amount collected. Free riding on the tramcars 
has been granted to those recruits who have joined the city 
battalions and are not housed at the places where their 
training is taking place, and have therefore to travel daily 
to and from their homes. The free traveling facilities are 
provided by granting supplies of tokens to the commanding 
officers, who undertake to distribute the tokens and to see 
that the privilege is not abused. The value of the tokens 
distributed up to the present has been £2,057, which equals 
nearly 500,000 Id. fares." 

A communication to the Electric Railway Journal from 
James Dalrymple, general manager Glasgow Corporation 
Tramways, states that the company is at the present time 
recruiting an additional 300 men as a reserve company for 
the tramway battalion, and later will probably be asked to 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



308 



procure another 300. The men of the "First Glasgow" 
H. L. I., comfortably housed at Gailes, are now equipped and 
almost ready for the front. The company has prepared leaf- 
lets describing its troops and is having its female staff dis- 
tribute these in the cars. 

As to the new conductors, Mr. Dalrymple says that, al- 
though practically all new men with but very little training, 
they are doing quite well. The revenues of the company are 
showing a slight increase over last year. The fiscal year 
does not end until May 31, but if conditions continue as at 
present, the revenues should about equal those of last year. 



The nine-hour day bill, covering substation or switch- 
board operators who control or report train movements 
of electric railways, has been killed in the House. 



RAPID TRANSIT IN CINCINNATI 

Representatives of a number of civic organizations at- 
tended the meeting of the Rapid Transit Commission of 
Cincinnati at the Business Men's Club on Jan. 29. Presi- 
dent Edwards of the commission explained the four plans 
presented by the engineers recently and then said that if 
the east and west sides of the loop in scheme No. 4 were 
built, all the interurban lines with one exception would have 
entrance to the business section of the city. He said that 
this line could be brought in over one of the surface tracks 
until the remainder of the loop is completed. The cost of 
constructing the two sections would be about $3,000,000 less 
than for the entire loop. A suggestion from another 
speaker that only one side of the loop be constructed at first 
met with disfavor. 

The east side of the loop extends from the business dis- 
trict to Forest, while the west side extends to Crawford. 
The third side connects these two points and passes through 
Mitchell, St. Bernard, Paddock and Montgomery. Rapid 
transit service could not be furnished these places until the 
city is able to build the third section, if the plans suggested 
are carried out, but it was said at the meeting that they 
do not form a portion of the city and there is no obligation 
to furnish their residents with the new service at once. 

W. W. Freeman, president of the Union Gas & Electric 
Company, sent a communication to the commission in which 
he stated that his company would do everything possible 
to aid in the improvement and that power might be fur- 
nished from its plants for the operation of the road on a 
more economical basis than if generated in stations built 
by the city. The commission promised to give this matter 
serious consideration. 

Walter M. Schoenle, city solicitor, told the commission 
that he had prepared a bill for introduction in the Legisla- 
ture that would, if passed, result in relinquishing the city 
from paying a rental of $32,000 a year for the use of the 
canal bed for the rapid transit line. The commission de- 
layed any expression of opinion on the matter until the 
bill has received careful consideration. 



INDIANA LEGISLATURE 

The following bills have been introduced in the Indiana 
House: A bill providing that incorporated towns of 500 
or more inhabitants may by order of the Town .Board com- 
pel the stationing of flagmen or installation of signal sys- 
tems at dangerous railroad or interurban crossings within 
the towns; a bill amending the tax laws to place the power 
of evaluating all public utilities in the hands of the State 
board of tax commissioners; a bill amending the old rail- 
road commission act (now thrown under the Public Service 
Commission) providing that the commission shall have six 
months instead of thirty days to take action on railroad 
tariffs; a bill amending the present 2-cent fare law, and 
fixing the maximum fare at 2% cents a mile. , 

In introducing the last measure, Mr. Waltz called the 
attention of the General Assembly to the fact that the 
Interstate Commerce Commission has recommended a 2%- 
cent rate in interstate business and that the various states 
enact laws to make such a rate legal within the confines 
of the several states. 

The "anti-lobby" bill has passed the Indiana House, and 
has been amended and passed by the Senate. One of the 
Senate amendments provides that if any newspaper re- 
ceives compensation for printing any article advocating 
or opposing any measure before the Legislature, it shall 
print the amount of the compensation received for such 
article and at whose instance it was printed. The amended 
bill has been approved and passed by the House, and will 
probably be signed by the Governor. 



SECURITY SELLING COMPANY UNDER INVES- 
TIGATION 

At the instance of the Interborough-Metropolitan Com- 
pany, New York, N. Y., District Attorney Perkins has under 
investigation the Interborough-Metropolitan Investing & Se- 
curity Company, which has recently been selling to Italian 
subway laborers for $24 a share Interborough-Metropolitan 
Company common stock quoted at $11 and $12 a share. The 
security selling company, which of course has no connection 
with the railway, induced the Italians to purchase these 
shares through advertising in Italian newspapers. The ad- 
vertisement featured the great "opportunity" that accom- 
panied the sale of the stock at $24, but carefully refrained 
from making any direct promises or statements that might 
give grounds to action for fraud. The railway has. notified 
August Belmont & Company, transfer agents, not to trans- 
fer any of the stock to the Italian buyers and altogether 
about 300 shares of stock have been refused for transfer. 
It is reported that suit will be brought against the Inter- 
borough-Metropolitan Company by one of the New York 
Stock Exchange brokerage houses that have been dragged 
into the affair, to recover damages for the holding up of its 
stock transfers. The railway, however, in order to protect 
its Italian workers, is willing to allow the courts to decide 
the legality of its stand. The security selling company, 
which is said to be headed by Roberto Parodi, was formed 
to deal only in Interborough-Metropolitan stock and has 
been in existence for little more than two week<?. Accord- 
ing to latest advices, Mr. Parodi has been arrested on the 
charge of grand larceny in the second degree. 



BAY STATE ARBITRATION HEARINGS 

Hearings by the Bay State Street Railway wages arbitra- 
tion board were suspended during the week ended Jan. 30 
on account of other engagements of counsel. At the later 
sessions various division superintendents located at impor- 
tant points north and south of Boston testified that the 
policy of the company was one of leniency toward mistakes 
of an unintentional character and that there was no diffi- 
culty in securing a plentiful supply of new men at the pre- 
vailing rate of wages. Representatives of the union ad- 
mitted that in conferences last fall the company had offered 
to put into effect a daily guarantee of five hours' pay for 
all transportation employees, but that the offer was refused 
by the union, which desired a seven-hour guarantee. P. F. 
Sullivan, president of the company, also offered to increase 
the wages of blue uniformed men 0.5 cent an hour for two 
successive years, pointing out at the conferences that the 
company's finances would not justify a further advance. 
Extended testimony was offered by employees to the effect 
that the cost of living has risen materially in the last five 
years and that the present maximum of 28 cents an hour 
should be increased to 35 cents. The employees' union con- 
tends that new men should be paid 30 cents an hour and 
that at the end of the first year the maximum should be at- 
tained. The company's side of the case has not yet been 
presented. Prof. Irving Fisher of Yale University testified 
on behalf of the employees' union that the cost of living has 
risen about 50 per cent in the last eighteen years. The rise 
in prices is the resultant of five different factors: amount of 
money in circulation, amount of deposits subject to check, 
the velocity of circulation, activity of bank accounts and the 
volume of trade. Professor Fisher contended that $16 a 
week is the minimum wage upon which a family of five can 
subsist. 



COUNCIL MEETINGS IN CLEVELAND 

The plan to have the Cleveland (Ohio) Railway purchase 
the North Randall line at $146,000 was defeated at a meet- 
ing of the City Council on Feb. 1, although Peter Witt, 
street railway commissioner, favored the idea. 

The street railway committee has presented an adverse 
report on Councilman Gahn's proposed ordinance requiring 
the Cleveland Railway to furnish derailer operators at all 
grade crossings. 

In reply to an inquiry from Councilman Dittrick, on 



304 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 6 



Feb. 1, Mr. Witt said that the $2,500,000 which the com- 
pany had agreed to expend in extensions and betterments 
under the Tayler agreement has been exhausted. Pro- 
posals for the expenditure of funds for this purpose must 
now be made by the company. Council has a right to veto 
the plans, however. The money has been used for the 
construction of division carhouses and buildings, track 
and rolling stock. 

Virgil J. Terrill has undertaken to relieve certain cities 
of the necessity of seeking consents from the owners of 
property abutting on proposed street railway lines by in- 
troducing a bill in the Legislature making this unnecessary 
in cities that operate under a charter adopted in accordance 
with the State constitution. This is meant to apply to 
Cleveland and especially to open the way to building tracks 
on Euclid Avenue between East Twenty-second and Fortieth 
Streets, otherwise known as "Millionaires' Row." The city 
wants this section of road built the coming spring and 
summer. 

The Council asked the company to operate its motor buses 
on East Thirtieth Street to test the need for a crosstown 
line at that point. The income from the bus operated on 
Noble Road at a 5-cent fare, for December, 1914, was 6.03 
cents per car-mile, while the cost of operation was in ex- 
cess of 20 cents, it is said. During the same month the 
bus on Pearl Road earned only 4.68 cents per car-mile, 
with the cost of operation about the same. These routes 
are outside the city limits. 



TRACKLESS TROLLEY BILL IN PENNSYLVANIA 

Representative Cans of Philadelphia has introduced a 
bill in the Legislature at Harrisburg that would overcome 
the objections of the Public Service Commission to granting 
charters to "trackless trolley" companies. Recently appli- 
cation was made to the commission for a certificate of 
public convenience by the Perkiomen Electric Transit Com- 
pany, which proposed to run a trackless trolley through 
the Perkiomen Valley. The commission refused the appli- 
cation on the ground that under the general corporation 
act of 1874 no provision was made for the granting of 
charters for such a company, as noted in the Electric 
Railway Journal of Jan. 16. The bill of Mr. Gans amends 
the act of 1874 governing the incorporation of motorbus 
and omnibus lines by providing regulations for corpora- 
tions drawing power from overhead wires. It is under- 
stood that the Perkiomen company, should the bill become 
a law, will apply again to the commission for a charter. 



DETROIT PURCHASE NEGOTIATIONS 

James Couzens, president of the Detroit street railway 
commission, announced in an interview in Detroit news- 
papers that negotiations for the purchase of the property 
of the Detroit United Railway within the one-fare zone 
would be undertaken shortly by the commission on the 
basis of the appraisal of $21,000,000 made for the commis- 
sion by Prof. E. W. Bemis. He intimated that the city had 
a club to force a reasonable price in the 3-cent fare ordi- 
nance which was dropped at the time the day-to-day agree- 
ment establishing seven-for-a-quarter tickets was reached. 
He also stated that if the people rejected the price as agreed 
upon by the commission and the company the commission 
would then know whether the electors wanted municipal 
ownership and what plan to follow thereafter. Professor 
Bemis, in his supplementary report to the commission, fixed 
the franchise values of the Detroit city lines at approxi- 
mately $2,.500,000, making the total appraisal about $21,- 
000,000 up to July 1, 1914. Prof. David Friday, of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, who appraised the franchises for the 
company, set the value at $7,500,000. 



CLEVELAND FARE MATTER 

Members of the Council of Cleveland, Ohio, are threaten- 
ing the Cleveland Railway with an invasion of auto bus 
service. Interviews with Councilman William Stolte have 
appeared in the local papers suggesting bus operation. 
Councilmen W. J. Reynolds and J. J. McGinty, however, have 
seconded his ideas to a large extent. They will try to have 
the company operate its three auto buses on East Thirtieth 
Street, where the next crosstown line is to be built, and 



test the extent to which a bus service can compete with the 
electric railway. These vehicles are now in operation on 
Noble Road. 

Councilman Dittrick in an interview on Jan. 28 stated 
that the amount paid out in accident claims will never be 
less so long as the cars are speeded up and the present 
schedules are maintained. He believes that people will have 
to be satisfied with a few minutes added to the running 
time of the cars if they wish to retain the low fare. 

Several councilmen favor the plan of J. J. Stanley, presi- 
dent of the company, extending the Prospect Avenue line 
from Fortieth Street to Fifty-fifth Street and linking up 
one of the West Side lines with it, in order to relieve the 
congestion at the Public Square by running cars through. 
Within a short time it is thought that the Euclid line will 
run through on Euclid and not around on Prospect, as at 
present. 



Bill in Kansas Legislature. — A bill has been introduced 
in the Kansas Senate providing that at all railway crossings 
in Kansas where a hedge fence approaches the crossing the 
fence must be kept cut down to a height not exceeding 5 ft. 
for a distance of eight rods from the highway. 

Local Control of Milwaukee Utilities. — By a vote of 
twenty-five to eleven, the Common Council of Milwaukee 
on Jan. 18 approved a bill to be presented to the State Leg- 
islature asking that the Wisconsin Railroad Commission be 
relieved of all jurisdiction over the public utilities in Mil- 
waukee, and that the control of these utilities be placed 
within the jurisdiction of the Council. 

Legislation on Working Conditions. — A bill has been in- 
troduced in the Ohio House which will require that street 
and interurban railways have motormen and conductors in- 
structed in their work for fifteen days prior to taking 
charge of cars; that nine hours shall constitute a work 
day, which is to be completed within eleven hours, and that 
motormen and conductors shall have thirteen consecutive 
hours of rest. 

Saskatoon Railway Results. — The City Council of Saska- 
toon, Sask., on Jan. 7, in passing the street railway esti- 
mates for this year, desired to have the commissioners 
bring in a detailed report on the public utilities, of which 
the municipal railway shows a loss. A telegraphic dispatch 
from Saskatoon states that notice of a motion has been 
given for an early meeting of the Council, to consider 
the sale of the municipal railway. 

Report on Montreal Franchises. — The Board of Control 
of Montreal, Que., on Jan. 4, in accordance with a resolution 
passed on Dec. 30, began a systematic study of the Montreal 
Tramway's twenty-three separate franchises, granted by 
the various municipalities now forming the city of Montreal, 
and the numerous engineering and statistical reports on 
the system. At the discussion on Jan. 9, the city attorney 
was asked for an opinion as to the various franchises, the 
rights comprised in them, etc. 

Passaic Gas Rate Case Reopened. — The New Jersey Court 
of Errors and Appeals on Jan. 27 granted a rehearing of 
the Passaic 90-cent gas rate case. This court, as noted in 
the Electric Railway Journal of Dec. 19, page 1331, re- 
versed the decision of the Public Utilities Commission re- 
ducing the gas rate to 90 cents, on the ground that the fran- 
chise values of the gas subsidiary of the Public Service 
Corporation of New Jersey had not been considered in de- 
termining the basis for a fair return. No date has yet been 
set for the rehearing. 

Brooklyn Rapid Transit Assessment Lowered. — The 

assessments made by the State Tax Commissioners against 
the Brooklyn Rapid Transit System for the 1915 special 
franchise tax have been lowered $3,000,000. In 1913 the 
component companies were assessed at sums aggregating 
$47,130,835, this amount being voluntarily cut by the State 
Board of Equalization in 1914 to $34,356,263. Corporation 
Counsel Polk has protested against the cut on the ground 
that the cost of pavement should be included in the cost of 
reproducing the tangible property in the streets. 

Legislation in Tennessee. — Three measures of much im- 
portance to the electric railways of Tennessee have just 
been introduced in the State Legislature. One would give 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



305 



ejty railways the right to acquire and operate interurban 
lines. Another would make it unlawful for passengers to 
sell or give away transfers and provide penalties for viola- 
tion of the law, while the third would require that all dam- 
age suits to persons or property be tried in counties where 
the accidents out of which they grew occurred, except when 
service of process may not be had in such counties. 

Delay on New York Subway. — Drippings of water and 
collections of dust from an opening near the Seventy-second 
Street station of the New York subway caused a short- 
circuit on the third-rail on one of the uptown express 
tracks near that point on the morning of Feb. 2. The 
matter would have been remedied in about ten minutes by 
the switching of the uptown express trains to the uptown 
local tracks and the removal of the defective insulator by 
a repair gang, but someone rang a fire alarm signal and 
the fire department insisted upon stopping all traffic and 
making the passengers leave all trains while it investigated 
the trouble. The result was a delay of an hour or more 
during the height of the rush-hour traffic. 

Ontario Hydro-Electric Railways. — The question of build- 
ing an electric railway from the Niagara frontier, via 
Hamilton, to the Georgian Bay, is under consideration of 
the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario. Comp- 
troller Morris, Hamilton, stated on Jan. 4 that F. A. Gaby, 
chief engineer of the commission, had shown him plans 
for a line from Queenston and Dunnville, through Hamil- 
ton, to Georgian Bay, and that the surveys had been com- 
pleted for this and connecting lines from Dunnville to 
Beamsville, from Queenston to Beamsville, and from 
Guelph to Toronto; that preliminary surveys had been made 
on other sections of the district to be served, and that the 
surveys would be resumed almost immediately. The con- 
struction of the line would depend entirely on the action 
Hamilton was prepared to take. 

Bills Introduced into the New York Legislature.— The 
following measures have recently been introduced into the 
Legislature of New York: To amend the public service 
commission law, in relation to the free transportation of 
chiefs of police of the municipalities of the State; to amend 
the code of criminal procedure, in relation to the payment 
of expenses and prosecution of crimes committed on rail- 
way trains; to amend the railroad law, in relation to the 
names of railroad stations; to make an appropriation for 
the elimination of certain grade crossings; to validate the 
consolidation of the Susquehanna Valley Electric Traction 
Company as a New York State corporation, with the Wav- 
erly, Sayre & Athens Electric Traction Company, a Penn- 
sylvania corporation, by which the Waverly, Sayre & Athen- 
Traction Company was formed; to amend the workmen's 
compensation law in relation to abolishing self-insurance. 

Disposition of Chicago's Traction Fund Explained. — Mayor 
Harrison of Chicago has issued a statement in reply to nu- 
merous criticisms regarding the loose handling of the $14,- 
000,000 traction fund. More than $2,500,000 of the fund is 
kept in Chicago banks. The records of authorization for dis- 
tributing the remainder, filed in the city comptroller's office, 
show that the city has been taking out cash for the last four 
years by substituting tax anticipation warrants. These war- 
rants are said to be a first lien against the city's taxes, be- 
ing retired as rapidly as taxes are received. 'They are per- 
mitted to be issued in an amount equal to only 75 per cent of 
the total of the city's share in the taxes. For the amount 
loaned the city has been paying the banking rate of 3 per 
cent. The City Council has taken no action on the Mayor's 
proposal to contribute a portion of the fund to a pension fund 
for railway employees. It was assailed by the employees' 
association as a subterfuge for securing votes. 

Merger Measure in Washington. — Ben Johnson, chairman 
of the district committee of the House, has referred to the 
District Commissioners the Page bill, which would authorize 
connecting or intersecting street railways of the District 
of Columbia to be operated under joint management. The 
district committee will take no action on the bill until the 
commissioners have handed in their recommendations. The 
Page bill, in short, authorizes any street railway in the 
District to acquire, by lease or purchase, connecting or 
intersecting lines, provided the holders of a majority of the 
stock of the two lines vote for consolidation or joint man- 
agement. It is stipulated, however, that lines which so 



consolidate shall charge only a single fare for a continuous 
ride within the District over all of the lines affected by the 
consolidation. It is also stipulated that the aggregate 
capital stock of the purchasing company shall not exceed 
the combined capital stocks of the contracting companies. 

Massachusetts Legislation. — Among the measures intro- 
duced into the Massachusetts Legislature is a bill providing 
that the rate of fare on street railways transporting passen- 
gers from one town to another shall not exceed 5 cents where 
the distance involved is not more than 5 miles. The bill is 
particularly aimed at the 6-cent fare unit established on the 
Middlesex & Boston Street Railway by recent decision of the 
Public Service Commission and also seeks to restrict interur- 
ban fares to the 1-cent per mile basis indicated above, with- 
in the 5-mile limit. A bill has been introduced into the 
House establishing a 2.5-cent fare by rebate check for pas- 
sengers unable to obtain seats on street cars, and another 
bill provides that all street railways shall equip their cars 
with steps not more than 8 in. above the ground and with a 
maximum rise of 7 in. on steps leading to the car platform 
from the lowest tread. A bill is also before the House re- 
quiring all street railways to meet the expense of oiling sec- 
tions of the public highways covered by their franchises, 
where the rest of the traveled way has already been oiled by 
the local authorities. 

Suits Against Chicago Railways for Ordinance Violations. 
— In accordance with the general policy recently adopted by 
the Chicago city administration of entering suits against 
railways for violation of city ordinances, more than 100 suits 
have been begun in the Municipal Court on account of the 
failure to post copies of the traction ordinances in the 
cars. Another suit involves the right of passengers to de- 
mand and receive transfers at all intersecting points, some 
of which were specifically excluded by provisions in the 1913 
merger ordinance. Still other suits charge the Chicago City 
Railway with posting only one copy of transfer regulations 
in the cars instead of two, as required by the ordinance. Ac- 
tion on suits previously brought has resulted in the fact that 
the Surface Lines have been fined in the Municipal Court 
for violating the ordinances requiring signs on cars clearly 
to designate both the route and destination. The company 
was fined $25 in each of sixty cases. Twenty-one more 
sign cases have just been submitted to the court and a 
fine of $50 each was assessed for violating the city ordi- 
nance. 



PROGRAMS OF ASSOCIATION MEETINGS 



Central Electric Railway Association 

The program for the annual meeting of the Central Elec- 
tric Railway Association, to be held at the Hotel Severn, 
Indianapolis, Ind., on Feb. 25 and 26, will include addresses 
by Samuel Ralston, Governor of Indiana; Judge Thomas 
Duncan, chairman of the Indiana Public Service Commis- 
sion; C. Loomis Allen, president of the American Electric 
Railway Association, and C. E. Peirce, vice-president of the 
Manufacturers' Association. 



A. L E. E. Mid-Winter Convention 

The third New York mid-winter convention of the Ameri- 
can Institute of Electrical Engineers will be held at institute 
headquarters, in New York, on Feb. 17, 18 and 19. The pro- 
gram will be of a general nature. Two sessions will be 
under the auspices of the transmission committee; one of 
these will be devoted to the discussion of impact testing of 
high-tension insulators; the other to miscellaneous subjects 
connected with high tension wor!-. Another session will be 
devoted to papers provided by the electrophysics, electric 
lighting and mining committees. The last technical session 
of the convention will be devoted to the subject of applica- 
tion of electric motors, and a number of prepared discus- 
sions will be presented giving the characteristics of each 
type of motor which govern its application to various kinds 
of work. The session on the evening of Feb. 17 will include 
addresses by a number of prominent engineers on the gen- 
eral subject of the status of the engineer. On the evening 
of Feb. 18 a dinner-dance will be held at the Hotel Astor. 
The afternoon of Feb. 19 will be devoted to inspection trips 
to points of engineering interest. 



306 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 6 



Financial and Corporate 

BANK HOLDINGS OF PUBLIC UTILITY BONDS 

According to the report of the Comptroller of the Cur- 
rency for the year ended June 30, 1914, the holdings of 
public utility bonds by the 26,765 banks of all kinds in the 
United States on that date were less by $137,500,000 than on 
the corresponding date in 1913. At the same time holdings 
of railroad bonds by these banks increased $145,100,000. 

This decrease in public utility holdings and increase in 
holdings of railroad bonds were caused by changes in the 
investments of trust companies and savings banks. The 
national banks took the opposite course in increasing their 
holdings of public utility bonds and decreasing their hold- 
ings of railroad bonds. 

The holdings of these classes of bonds over a three-year 
period are as follows: 

Public Utility Bonds 

1914 1913 1912 

National banks ?218,200,000 $197,400,000 $195,700,000 

Trust companies 224,700,000 334,300,000 208,700,000 

State banlts 50,800,000 52,900,000 53,600,000 

Savings banks 88,500,000 135,300,000 143,500,000 

$583,900,000 $721,400,000 $603,500,000 

Railroad Bonds 

National banks $341,700,000 $345,200,000 $384,300,000 

Trust companies 395,300,000 297,200,000 380,200,000 

State banks 76,600,000 65,500,000 71,500,000 

Savings banks 859,600,000 821,500,000 794,100,000 

$1,675,300,000 $1,530,200,000 $1,631,600,000 

The 7525 national banks reporting, increased their hold- 
ings of public utility bonds $20,800,000 in the period from 
June, 1913, to July, 1914, while at the same time their in- 
vestments in railroad bonds decreased $3,500,000. The 1564 
trust companies in this period increased their investments 
in railroad bonds by $98,100,000 and decreased their holdings 
of public utility bonds by $109,600,000. The 14,512 state 
banks decreased their public utility holdings by $2,100,000 
and increased their investment in railroad bonds by $11,100,- 
000. The 2100 mutual and stock savings banks increased 
their investments in railroad bonds by $38,100,000 and de- 
creased their public utility bond holdings by $46,800,000. 

The aggregate amount of holdings by all banks on June 
30, 1914, was $5,584,900,000, of which 10.43 per cent was in 
public utility bonds. The proportion of public utility bonds 
to the total holdings by each class of banks was as- follows: 
State banks, 13.70 per cent; mutual savings banks, 4.50 per 
cent; stock savings banks, 0.427 per cent; private banks, 
10.43 per cent; trust companies, 17.82 per cent; national 
banks, 11.40 per cent. 

CAPITALIZATION REPORT OF NEW YORK 
COMMISSION 

The division of capitalization of the Public Service Com- 
mission for the Second District of New York reports that 
the net amount of new securities authorized during the 
calendar year 1914 was $178,722,277. Since 1907 the com- 
mission has authorized nearly a billion dollars' worth of se- 
curities. A large part of the increase in 1914 was probably 
due to refunding operations and a number of purchases 
where securities were merely exchanged. During the year 
only ninety-four applications were made for authority to 
issue new securities, as compared to 126 in 1913 and 111 in 
1912. For the first time since it was created, the division 
began the new year with practically a clean slate. Com- 
menting on the acquisition of one property by another, 
H. C. Hopson, chief of the division, says that in many cases 
the purchasing corporation is obliged to pay a price in ex- 
cess of the original cost of the physical property acquired. 
The commission allows the increased purchase price but 
insists upon its amortization over a reasonable number of 
years. This practice results in a conservative statement of 
the property accounts of the acquiring company, and at the 
same time makes it possible to put into effect immediately 
the savings resulting from the cutting down of competition 
and the instituting of centralized management. Mr. Hop- 
son also emphasizes the fact that corporations should take 
better care of the filing of their vouchers and also make 
better explanations for entries in their capital accounts. 



ANNUAL REPORT 

Lehigh Valley Transit Company 

The statement of income, profit and loss of the Lehigh 
Valley Transit Company, Allentown, Pa., for the year 
ended Nov. 30, 1914, follows: 

Operating revenues : 

Revenue from transportation : 

Passenger revenue." $1,446,694' 

Other transportation revenue 78,075 

Total $1,524,769 

Revenue from other railway operations : Power 

sales, etc 344,236 

Total operating revenue $1,869,005 

Operating expenses 1,052,693 

Net operating revenue $816,312 

Taxes 97,961 

Operating income $718,351 

Non-operating income: 

Dividend income $107,963 

Interest on notes, bank balances, etc 14,985 

Total $122,948 

Gross income $841,299 

Deductions from gross income : 

Interest on funded debt $530,894 

Rent for leased roads 53,341 

Interest on unfunded debt. 17,915 

Amortization of discount on funded debt 20,432 

Miscellaneous debits ; Legal expenses, etc 10,596 

Total $633,178 

Net income ■ $208,121 

In spite of the widespread business depression and the 
unusually severe winter, the gross earnings of the company 
increased slightly more than 1 per cent during the year. 
The report states that the company maintained its property 
at its usual standard and also continued to carry out its 
original program of improvements. An amount of 22 per 
cent of the gross earnings was allowed for maintenance and 
depreciation. The company now operates 167 miles of rail- 
way, of which 146.38 miles are owned and 20.62 miles are 
leased. Its rolling stock consists of 113 closed cars, forty- 
one open cars, eleven freight cars and thirty service cars, 
making a total of 195 cars. 

During the year the company acquired all the outstanding 
stock of the Easton Consolidated Electric Company. This 
company, in addition to the ownership of the Edison Illumi- 
nating Company of Easton, owns and controls 54 miles of 
railway from Easton to the Bethlehem district. It is stated 
that the through service established between Easton and 
Allentown has produced a large increase in the receipts of 
this line over the previous year, to the profit of both com- 
panies. The surplus earnings of the controlled company 
for the year ended Dec. 31, 1914 (December estimated), were 
stated to be $87,163. The interest charges on the collateral 
trust bonds now outstanding amount to $55,446, thus leaving 
a profit of $51,717 for the Lehigh Valley Transit Company 
on its investment. 

In regard to its freight and express service, the report 
says that an efficient service of this character is operated 
from all points on the Lehigh Valley Transit Company to 
Philadelphia in connection with the freight department of 
the Philadelphia Rapid Transit Company. Arrangements 
were completed to include the Lansdale-Morristown terri- 
tory on Jan. 2, 1915. The company rents a portion of the 
new transfer station erected by the Philadelphia Rapid 
Transit Company at Chestnut Hill, the transfer point. Dur- 
ing the year the surplus from the freight department in- 
creased 25 per cent in the face of the prevailing adverse 
business conditions. Moreover, the surplus from the Adams 
Express Company business was 80 per cent more than during 
the previous year. 

In summarizing the year's work, special attention was 
called to new track in Allentown, on the Bethlehem Pike, 
and in New Jersey; the installation of automatic signals 
on the Slatington Division; the removal of dangerous curves 
and steep grades; the building of new equipment in the 
company's shops; the purchase of nine new prepayment 
cars and the increased patronage of the company's high- 
speed limited service. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



307 



AMERICAN CITIES COMPANY PROSPECTS 

Member of Visiting Board of Directors Describes Conditions 
Existing in Company's Subsidiaries 

The board of directors of the American Cities Company, 
\'ew York, recently made a week's tour of the properties 

if the constituent companies at Houston, Tex.; Little Rock, 
Aik.; Memphis, Tenn.; Knoxville, Tenn., and Birmingham, 
Ala. One of the directors, Frank B. Hayne, New Orleans, 
in describing the unanimous conclusions of the board, states 
that a thorough inspection was made of all the properties, 
iniluding power houses, car shops, trackage and gas works, 
and the physical property of each subsidiary was found to 
be modern, up to date and competently handled. The prop- 
erties are fully rounded out to serve each community ade- 
quately, and the existing facilities are in advance of require- 
ments. The important question now is to develop fully the 
available business for which the systems have been so 

ulequately equipped. 
Continuing, Mr. Hayne says: 

"A most gratifying spirit of co-operation on the part of 
the citizens was exhibited toward the public utilities in 
each city visited. It was very pleasing to hear one Mayor 
refer to the American Cities Company as the greatest 
factor in helping to build up his city. In each city we were 
met by representative men who spent the full day not only 
in going around the properties with us, but also in ex- 
plaining the advantages and constant development of their 
cities. It was most encouraging to note the progressive 
development of these communities, and to know of the 
enthusiasm of each with respect to its future growth. 

"Of equal weight with this spirit of co-operation was the 
outspoken recognition on the part of the leading citizens 
that the encouragement of outside capital was of the highest 
importance, that the most successful way to draw additional 
outside capital to their cities was through a broad distribu- 
tion of the local company's securities, placed in the hands 
of satisfied investors, and that to attack outside capital 
invested in their cities was the most certain way to de- 
prive their communities of additional outside funds. This 
attitude toward the investment of capital in public utility 

ompanies is most encouraging." 



THIRD AVENUE DIVIDEND RECOMMENDED 

\rter Investigation, Stockholders' Committee Asks for 
Quarterly Dividend of 1 Per Cent 

The committee of stockholders of the Third Avenue Rail- 
way, New York, N. Y., appointed by President Frederick 
W. Whitridge at the last annual meeting to investigate the 
affairs of the company, as noted in the Electric Railway 
Journal of Nov. 21, 1914, submitted a report on Feb. 1, in 
which it recommended that a quarterly dividend of 1 per 
cent be declared shortly after the beginning of the next fiscal 
year, to be paid not later than Oct. 1, 1915. The commit- 
tee stated that with dividends paid at such a rate, there 
was no reason why the assets of the company should not 
continue to increase, why the conservative management of 
the company should suffer interference, or why the com- 
pany should not be able to keep up its budget requirements 
besides adding to its surplus. 

In reaching its conclusions, the committee said: "The 
special reserve for depreciation and contingencies from the 
statement ended June 30, 1914, has reached a total amount 
of $1,152,750. This amount was clearly a part ,of the net 
earnings of the property and should be considered as a part 
of the surplus earned since the company's organization, 
Jan. 1, 1912, which would increase the net income from 
$2,050,173 to $3,202,923. In 1914 the surplus earnings were 
$626,306 plus the reserve created for depreciation and con- 
tingencies, or $511,250— total, $1,137,556. These figures 
show that the net earnings of the company for 1914 were 
the equivalent of approximately 8 per cent on the stock, 
exclusive of the high maintenance charges, which were 
themselves a very liberal offset against depreciation." 

The report gave the present management a clean bill of 

health and found that the physical property of the company 

; is in commendable condition. In regard to the control ex- 



ercised by the board of directors, however, the committee 
reported as follows: 

"The records show that the company's directors, collec- 
tively, have at no time owned more than 113 shares of the 
total outstanding stock. The directorate is justly criticised 
as representing the bondholders and not the stockholders. 
A more general representation of the latter's interests is 
desirable as a matter of propriety as well as public policy." 

The committee also stated that the annual report of the 
company should be in the hands of stockholders thirty days 
before the annual meeting. In a letter to the board of di- 
rectors. President Whitridge agrees to this recommendation, 
but he states that the committee is in error in considering 
the depreciation reserve as earnings. Regarding the rep- 
resentative character of the board, he says: 

"The committee is mistaken in supposing that the present 
board represents only 113 shares of stock. One director is 
the representative of a company which has 6025 shares of 
stock in its name, and two directors are members of firms 
which at the time of the stockholders' meeting held 2722 
shares and 2015 shares, respectively. Besides this, I be- 
lieve that the present directors represent many thousands 
of shares in addition." 



British Columbia Electric Railway, Ltd., Vancouver, B. C. 

— It is announced that a dividend of 5 per cent per year 
has been declared on the preferred ordinary stock of the 
British Columbia Electric Railway for the half year, pay- 
able on Feb. 1. Last year a dividend of 6 per cent was 
paid. 

Brooklyn (N. Y.) Rapid Transit Company. — In regard 
to the gross and net earnings of the Brooklyn Rapid Tran- 
sit Company, which are published in this issue in the Table 
of Monthly Earnings, the company says that the abnormal 
gain in the operating revenue over the six months in 1913, 
$972,225, or 7.69 per cent, was caused by the operation this 
year of a part of the system of lines of the Coney Island 
& Brooklyn Railroad. The large increase in operating ex- 
penses, $801,834, was caused by the same factor. The de- 
crease in fixed charges, $117,567, was brought about by the 
conversion of refunding 4 per cent bonds into preferred 
stock. At the recent annual meeting of the company, Eu- 
gene N. Foss, Boston, was added to the board of directors 
to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of George F. 
Porter. At the present time the company has 8406 stock- 
holders, compared to 6319 on June 9, 1914, and 3709 on 
June 9, 1913. 

Chicago City & Connecting Railways, Chicago, 111. — The 
financial statement of the Chicago City & Connecting 
Railways, formed as a collateral trust in 1910 to hold se- 
curities of the Chicago City Railway and various connecting 
railways serving outlying districts, shows that the gross 
income for the year ended Dec. 31, 1914, was $2,052,026, 
consisting of $1,964,771 from dividends and $87,255 from 
interest. Disbursements during the year required the fol- 
lowing sums: Bond interest, $1,100,000; general expense, 
$45,081, and interest on bills payable, $16,033, a total of 
$1,161,114. The net income, therefore, was $890,912, which 
after a deduction of $875,000 for dividends on participation 
shares gave a surplus of $15,912. 

Cleveland, Youngstown & Eastern Railway, Cleveland, 
Ohio. — On Jan. 30 Judge Pearson of the Cuyahoga County 
Common Pleas Court gave the Citizens' Savings & Trust 
Company, trustee for the bondholders, a judgment for $53,- 
560 against the Cleveland, Youngstown & Eastern Railway 
on mortgages covering the portion of its line in Geauga and 
Portage Counties. Receiver Robert Beatty, whose appoint- 
ment was noted in the Electric Railway Journal of Jan. 
2, was ordered to sell that portion of the property within 
ten days, unless the mortgage is satisfied within the period. 
Bondholders charge that the line has been allowed to 
deteriorate. 

Columbus Railway, Power & Light Company, Columbus, 
Ohio. — The stockholders of the Columbus Railway, Power 
& Light Company on Jan. 26 approved the proposition to 
purchase the Columbus Light, Heat & Power Company. 
Previous references to this purchase were made in the 
Electric Railway Journal of Nov. 7, Nov. 14, and Nov. 
28, 1914, and Jan. 9 and Jan. 23, 1915. 



308 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[VOL. XLV, No. 6 



Electric Bond & Share Company, New York, N. Y.— The 

directors of the Electric Bond & Share Company have called 
a special meeting of stockholders on Feb. 17 after the reg- 
ular annual meeting for the purpose of authorizing an in- 
crease in the company's capitalization from $10,000,000 to 
$16,000,000 through adding $3,000,000 of 6 per cent pre- 
ferred stock and $3,000,000 of common stoqk. 

Gary & Interurban Railroad, Gary, Ind. — It has just 
been announced that the payment of coupons due on Sept. 
1, 1914, on the $350,000 of 6 per cent convertible notes of 
the Gary & Interurban Railroad, which payment was for a 
time deferred, was made on Nov. 29, 1914. 

Long Island Railroad, New York, N. Y. — Dick Brothers & 
Company, New York, are asking for proxies to be used 
at the annual meeting of the Long Island Railroad on April 
13. It is asserted by the bankers that during the fourteen 
years when the Pennsylvania Railroad has operated this 
property the debts have increased more than $50,000,000, 
and the net earnings have been reduced from a substantial 
surplus to a deficit in 1915 of almost $1,000,000. Accord- 
ing to a statement issued by President Ralph Peters, the 
Pennsylvania Railroad acquired its interest in the stock 
of the Long Island Railroad in 1901. At that time the 
Long Island Railroad was not paying dividends and had not 
paid any for five years. The property needed rehabilitation 
to eliminate grade crossings and electrify its road. This 
work, which is approaching completion, has involved an 
outlay of about $50,000,000, and has been accomplished 
largely through the co-operation of the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road and by the use of that company's credit, without any 
assistance from the other stockholders. Mr. Peters men- 
tioned several improvements which have been to the ad- 
vantage of the Long Island Railroad, but which have been 
paid for by the Pennsylvania Railroad. In his opinion the 
charges made for the use of the Pennsylvania Terminal and 
the East River Tunnels are moderate, and the result 
through their aid has been a large increase in passenger 
traffic. 

Mexico Tramways, Mexico City, Mexico. — It is reported 
that the Mexico Tramways has deferred the interest due 
on Jan. 1 on $6,083,333 of 6 per cent mortgage second issue 
bonds. The company has interest due on March 1 on $10,- 
298,000 of first consolidated bonds, and it is probable this 
will also be defaulted, as conditions in Mexico are not im- 
proving. 

Michigan Railway, Kalamazoo, Mich. — E. W. Clark & 
Company, Philadelphia, are offering to yield about 6.5 per 
cent the unsold portion of an issue of $5,000,000 of first 
lien 6 per cent five-year gold notes of the Michigan Rail- 
way. The notes are dated June 1, 1914, and mature on 
June 1, 1919. The payment of principal and interest is 
guaranteed by the controlling company, the Commonwealth 
Power, Railway & Light Company. A full description of 
this issue was given in the Electric Railway Journal of 
June 27, 1914, in connection with the original offer of the 
notes. 

Monterey & Pacific Grove Railway, Monterey, Cal. — At a 

recent meeting of .the bondholders of the Monterey & Pacific 
Grove Railway, a protective committee, consisting of Car- 
ver Pomeroy, W. F. Williamson and R. H. Cross, was ap- 
pointed. The interest default on the first mortgage 6 per 
cent bonds of this company was noted in the Electric Rail- 
way Journal of Jan 23. "Jitney" bus competition was 
stated to be the cause of the default. This company is 
controlled by the Coast Valleys Gas & Electric Company, 
a subsidiary of the California Railway & Power Company. 
New England Investment & Security Company, Spring- 
field, Mass — The Boston News Bureau of Jan. 27 says: "On 
April 1 the $13,709,000 of New England Investment & Se- 
curity Company debentures would, under their indenture, 
be entitled to a 2 per cent interest payment, or one-half of 
1 per cent more than the semi-annual rate during the first 
five years of their fifteen-year term. According to the 
last New Haven report, these debentures were owned by 
the New England Navigation Company and carried by it 
at a book value of almost par, although appraised at only 
$9,000,000 as collateral behind the $20,000,000 of short-term 
notes of the New England Navigation Company. An un- 
derstanding has recently been reached with the New Haven 



interests by which the latter will on April 1 receive but 1 
per cent on these notes and be afterwards allotted the full 
interest rate only if earned. Without such a reduction in 
charges, the income of the New England Investment Com- 
pany for the last six months would have been considerably 
short of the 2 per cent semi-annual disbursement made on 
Jan. 1 on its 40,000 preferred shares. Holders of about 
34,000 shares of preferred stock who last autumn contributed 
$10 per share toward the purchase of the company's 1000 
shares of common stock, are likely to receive back from 
the protective committee which has closed that transaction 
not far from $1.75 per share. This means that Sanderson 
& Porter received about $275,000 for the common stock, as 
compared to the $200,000 which they paid for it." 

New York State Railways, Rochester, N. Y. — Harris, 
Forbes & Company, New York; N. W. Harris & Company, 
Inc., Boston, and the Harris Trust & Savings Bank, Chi- 
cago, are off'ering for sale fifty-year first consolidated mort- 
gage 4% per cent gold bonds of the New York State Rail- 
ways. These bonds are dated 1912 and due Nov. 1, 1962, 
but are callable at 105 and interest on any interest date. 
The purchase of these bonds through J. P. Morgan & Com- 
pany for a banking syndicate was noted in the Electric 
Railway Journal of Jan. 30. An amount of $6,925,000 of 
this issue is already listed on the New York Stock Ex- 
change, and application will be made to list the remainder. 

Oakland, Antioch & Eastern Railway, Oakland, Cal. — The 
committee appointed on Dec. 11 by the security holders of 
the Oakland, Antioch & Eastern Railway to look into the 
affairs of the company, as noted in the Electric Railway 
Journal of Dec. 19, has reported unfavorably upon the plan 
of the management for the financing of the company dur- 
ing the next three years. The main finding of the com- 
mittee is that the plan is unfair to the bondholders, in that 
it would increase the liabilities of the company by creating 
new debts through the issuance of new notes and the pledg- 
ing of new bonds. After the report was submitted the se- 
curity holders authorized the appointment of a new com- 
mittee of seven members, three to be appointed by the 
security holders, three by the directors and the seventh 
member by the two foregoing groups. It is reported that 
the time for the payment of the assessment of $1.50 per 
share on the stock of this company and of $3 per share 
on the stock of the Oakland & Antioch Railway, called for 
Jan. 15, has been extended to Feb. 13. 

Ohio Traction Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. — On Jan. 25 
the Ohio Public Utilities Commission authorized the Ohio 
Traction Company to issue $1,500,000 of 6 per cent gold 
coupon notes to be sold for the highest price obtainable but 
for not less than 95. These notes mature as follows: Sept. 
1, 1916, $200,000; Sept. 1, 1917, and Sept. 1, 1918, $300,000, 
and Sept. 1, 1919, and Sept. 1, 1920, $350,000. This issue 
has been authorized to take the place of $750,000 of 5 per 
cent preferred stock authorized in 1912 to be sold at 90, and 
$300,000 authorized in 1913, which the company has been 
unable to market on the terms prescribed by the com- 
mission. The proceeds from this note issue, just as in the 
original authorization of the stock, are to be used to reim- 
burse the company for expenditures made on capital ac- 
count. 

Quebec Railway, Light, Heat & Power Company, Quebec, 
Can. — The Quebec-Jacques Cartier Electric Company, a sub- 
sidiary of the Quebec Railway, Light, Heat & Power Com- 
pany, has defaulted interest on its first mortgage 5 per cent 
bonds due on Dec. 1, 1914, and a protective committee has 
been formed with the Bankers Trust Company, New York, 
as depository. It is reported that the subsidiary is simply 
taking advantage of the ninety-day period of grace allowed 
by the indenture and that arrangements will be made by 
March 1, when foreclosure proceedings would be possible, 
to pay the interest. 

Republic Railway & Light Company, New York, N. Y. — 
White, Weld & Company and Montgomery, Clothier & Tyler, 
both of New York, are offering for sale at 98% and in- 
terest, to yield 6V4 per cent, 5 per cent secured gold notes 
of the Republic Railway & Light Company, dated April 1, 
1912, and due on Jan. 1, 1916. These notes are redeemable 
at 100 and interest at thirty days' notice. They are secured 
by deposit with the trustee of 98.5 per cent of the stock of 



\ 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



309 



the Mahoning & Shenango Railway & Light Company, and 
are also a first lien, through deposit of first mortgage bonds, 
(HI new power house and other physical property costing 
more than $1,720,000. 

San Francisco-Oakland Terminal Railways, San Francisco, 
(ill. — The California Railroad Commission has issued a 
notice to the effect that it will conduct on its own initiative 
an investigation as to the value of the property of the San 
I" luncisco-Oakland Terminal Railways. A public hearing in 
the matter has been set for Feb. 23 in San Francisco before 
I ommissioner Phelen. 

['win City Rapid Transit Company, Minneapolis, Minn. — 
I lonald Goodrich, who is a son of C. G. Goodrich, president 
Twin City Rapid Transit Company, has been elected a direc- 
tor to succeed Sir Henry M. Pellatt. It is reported that a 
proposition to reduce the membership of the board from 
twelve to eleven will be taken under consideration at a later 
date. 

United Light & Railways Company, Grand Rapids, Mich. — 
N. W. Halsey & Company, New York, are placing on a 6% 
per cent basis $1,500,000 of 6 per cent gold coupon notes 
ol' the United Light & Railways Company. These notes are 
dated Jan. 1, 1915, and are due Jan. 1, 1918, and Jan. 1, 1920, 
!' it are callable, all or in part, upon four weeks' i)^tice at 
I and interest and 101 and interest, respectively. The 
. oceeds of these notes will be used to complete payments on 
) property heretofore acquired and to reimburse the treasury 
' for improvements to subsidiary properties. The notes will 
be secured by deposit with the New York Trust Company, 
as trustee, of $2,000,000 of first and refunding mortgage 
5 per cent bonds, due in 1932. The authorized note issue is 
$3,000,000, but in addition to the present $1,500,000, more 
notes may be issued only as additional bonds are pledged 
and only in an amount not to exceed 75 per cent of their par 
value. 



Traffic and Transportation 



DIVIDENDS DECLARED 

Boston (Mass.) Elevated Railway, quarterly, 1% per cent. 

Illinois Traction System, Peoria, 111., quarterly, 3 per 
cent, common. 

Lincoln (Neb.) Traction Company, quarterly, IV2 per 
cent, preferred. 

Ohio Traction Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, quarterly, IV* 
per cent, preferred. 

Union Street Railway, New Bedford, Mass., quarterly, 
2 per cent. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY MONTHLY EARNINGS 



AMERICAN RAILWAYS, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Gross Operating Net Fixed Net 

Period Earnings Expenses Earnings Charges Surplus 

Im., Dec, '14 $467,973 

i 1 13 462,149 

16 14 2,866,770 

1 6 13 2,872,839 



ATLANTIC SHORE RAILWAY, 
Im., Dec, '14 $23,722 *$22,873 
1 13 24,608 •21,377 



SANFORD, 

$849 
3,231 



MAINE 



BROOKLYN (N. Y.) RAPID TRANSIT COMPANY 

6m., Dec,'14 $13,607,760 $7,521,934 $6,085,826 $2,350,593 t$3,096,993 

16 13 12,635,535 6,720,100 5,915,435 2,733,794 t2, 733, 793 

CLEVELAND, SOUTHWESTERN & COLUMBUS RAILWAY, 

CLEVELAND, OHIO. 

1 Im., Dec, '14 $96,900 $62,470 $34,430 $30,791 $3,639 

1 1 13 105,365 62,807 42,557 33,087 9,470 

112" " '14 1,255,283 757,020 498,262 386,725 111,537 
jl2" " '13 1,255,235 759,387 495,848 381,930 133,918 

INTERBOROUGH RAPID TR.\NSIT COMPANY, NEW YORK, 

I N. Y. 

, Im., Dec, '14 $3,000,365 $1,365,197 $1,635,168 $913,036 t$776,416 

' 1 13 3,035,729 1,332,748 1,702,981 913,149 t843,904 

16 14 16,270,705 7,404,178 8,866,527 7,209,819 13,689,954 

: 6 13 15,999,453 8,866,527 7,132,926 7,209,819 JS, 272, 574 

* MONONGAHELA VALLEY TRACTION COMPANY, FAIRMONT, 
I W. VA. 

' 12m., Dec, '14 $968,389 $415,724 $552,665 $308,642 $244,023 
■12 13 960,262 346,712 613,549 298,048 315,501 

I PHILADELPHIA (PA.) RAPID TRANSIT COMPANY 

I Im., Dec, '14 $2,074,523 $1,202,654 $871,869 $807,016 $64,853 

! 1 13 2,141,522 1,248,860 892,662 808,663 83,999 

! 6 14 11,945,123 6,898,721 5,046,402 4,847,955 198,447 

6 " " '13 12,239,537 7,136,034 5,103,503 4,796,161 307,342 

•Includes taxes, flncludes adjustments. Jlncludes other income. 



THE "JITNEY" BUS 



Thirty-nine Cities Have at the Present Time Been Invaded 
by the Fare Snipers 

Among the cities in which "jitney" bus services have 
been installed are Los Angeles, Oakland, Pasadena, Fresno, 
San Diego, San Francisco, Portland, Seattle, Tacoma, Van- 
couver, El Paso, Houston, Galveston, Ft. Worth, Dallas, 
Austin, San Antonio, Beaumont, Wichita, Lawrence, Topeka, 
Emporia, Kansas City, Joplin, St. Joseph, St. Louis, Ogden, 
Birmingham, Des Moines, Fort Smith, Oklahoma City, 
Tulsa, Denver, Baltimore, Sterling, 111.; Pittsburg, Kan.; 
Omaha, New Orleans and Detroit. 

"Jitney" owners in Kansas City have been besieging the 
casualty companies for liability insurance, but without suc- 
cess. A slight accident, when a small car, heavily loaded, 
overturned at a curve, injuring three persons, has brought 
to the attention of the drivers and owners the question of 
responsibility for damages. One insurance agent said: 
"We are very careful in writing liability on automobiles, 
and it is unlikely that any cars in the service have pre- 
viously been covered. The car must be paid for or be 
backed by substantial assets before we write it. Such cars 
are not going into the 'jitney' business." 

No action has been taken at Kansas City so far to cancel 
liability insurance on automobiles that are put into "jitney" 
service, but such procedure was intimated. Liability com- 
panies seem uncertain as to whether the usual double in- 
demnity for injury while riding in a public conveyance 
would be collectible by the holder of a personal accident 
policy. 

The Kansas City Times is carrying a column headed 
"Kansas City's 'Jitney' Service," under which the bus routes 
so far established are enumerated and number of cars and 
leaving times given wherever possible, and also the name 
of the person operating the route. 

So significant does the San Antonio Express consider the 
bus situation that in its issue of Jan. 20 it reproduced 
under a heading from San Diego, Cal., the entire letter of 
William Clayton, managing director of the San Diego 
Electric Railway, addressed to the Common Council of that 
city. This communication had been published in abstract 
in the Electric Railway Journal. 

The chief engineer of the Public Service Commission of 
the State of Washington has reported to Chairman Charles 
Reynolds of the commission in regard to the operation of 
the "jitney" buses in Seattle. He recommends that im- 
mediate action be taken to remedy the situation. Accord- 
ing to the engineer the Seattle Electric Company is losing 
$2,450 in revenues daily, while the bus drivers are making 
an average net profit or wage of $2.33 a day. The report 
says that the 518 buses in that city are carrying 49,000 
passengers daily who formerly rode on the electric street 
railways. 

Councilman Allen Dale, of Seattle, is fathering a bill to 
compel bus owners to come under identical regulation with 
the street railways in the matter of handling passengers, 
gross earning tax, construction of bridges and maintenance 
of paved streets. Councilman Hesketh seeks to have the 
capacity of every vehicle operated for hire limited to its 
seating capacity. A third ordinance is in course of prepa- 
ration to settle definite routes of travel through the down- 
town streets for buses. "Jitney" bus drivers will, how- 
ever, come under the provisions of the ordinance recently 
passed by the City Council requiring all drivers of motor 
vehicles for hire to pass not only a medical examination 
but one as to proficiency in handling cars on crowded thor- 
oughfares. This ordinance becomes effective on Feb. 7. 

Objection to the operation of buses has taken a new turn 
at North Yakima, Wash. In that city the Electrical Work- 
ers' Union has gone on record as being opposed to the 
buses on the ground that they are jeopardizing the street 
railway service with the result that many street railway 



310 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 6 



men, among them electrical workers, will be thrown out of 
employment. 

The "jitney" bus has made its appearance in Detroit, 
one car operating on Woodward Avenue the early part of 
the week ended Jan. 30. Newspaper announcements state 
that others are to be placed in service. It has also been 
announced that a company is to be organized to run the 
buses along systematic lines. 

Interviewed by the Oklahoma News in regard to the 
"jitney" bus, George W. Knox, general manager of the 
Oklahoma Railway, said in part: 

"I am not at all downhearted about the little pest that 
has, I am sure it will prove, temporarily infested itself 
upon us. It is only another example of one of the char- 
acteristic spasms of the American people to try something 
new, and the scheme will have to run its course, regardless 
of the economic features involved; that is, duplicating an 
already adequate service means someone is squandering 
or losing resources and the fiddler vsdll have to be paid 
finally, and it is inevitable that the public will have to foot 
the bill. 

"Anyone who owns an automobile, if he will take just a 
few moments of his time and will be honest with himself, 
will be able to demonstrate that by this system it is not 
possible to transport passengers for 5 cents, even short 
distances, at a profit. Taking a few concrete examples, 
here is a case where under most favorable conditions the 
'jitney' service has been applied with the following results: 

Average hours per day of cars In service 15 

Average speed in miies, per liour 14 

Average earnings per car, per liour, in cents 70 

Average earning per car, per mile, in cents 5 

Operating costs, in cents: 

Oil and gasoline, per mile , 1 

Tires and tubes, per mile 1 

Maintenance, per mile 1% 

Pepreciation, per mile 1 

Wages of operators, per mile 2 

Total cost of operation per mile evi 

"The cars used in the above mentioned instance were the 
best type of light efficient machines made. If larger ca- 
pacity cars are used, the cost of operation will be nearly 
doubled. As further evidence of the failure of the plan, 
it is known that a well-organized and equipped auto bus 
concern on the Pacific coast has had to go into the hands 
of a receiver and has quit business. 

"I have always found the people of Oklahoma fair, and 
in fact, the great strides made in its wonderful develop- 
ment are due to the spirit of fairness manifested, one 
business toward the other, so it will be in this matter, 
further than this — ish ka bibble." 

The State Board of Equalization of California, in its re- 
port, says: 

"The Pacific Electric Railway, which has made careful 
observation of automobile competition with its lines, reports 
to this board that the company alone is losing $20,000 a 
month or .$240,000 per annum from this cause. The State 
tax on that alone would have been $11,400. One company 
alone carried 122,686 passengers in a period of thirteen 
days with an estimated revenue of nearly $24,000. It is 
probable the State loss from this source is at least $200,000 
per annum. 

"In addition to the big double-deck buses and other large 
motors that ply over more or less regular routes and on a 
more or less definite time schedule, there are many smaller 
vehicles plying for hire on less regular schedules, all doing 
the same kind of business which comes under the purview 
of the State tax system. It would appear that the State 
tax system ought to be extended to cover these carriers, 
both to protect the State revenues and in justice to the 
taxed transportation companies." 

The Denver Tramway Company has issued a modern fable, 
entitled "The Landlord," written by John A. Beeler, vice- 
president and general manager. In this fable the munici- 
pality represents the landlord; and the premises, the city 
streets. The moral is that the taxes and sums paid for city 
improvements by the tramway are of more importance to the 
landlord than the insignificant license fees paid by "jitney" 
bus operators. In addition to the franchise and general tax 
aggregating more than $200,000 per year, the tramway com- 
pany pays interest on about $2,000,000 of bonds that have 



been issued for street paving, grading and other public im 
provements, which at 6 per cent amounts to about $120,00 
per year. Repairs to paving and the removal of snow an 
ice average about $50,000 per year. These items total $370, 
000, all of which goes to the public good. On the contrarj 
however, if the proposed sixty-six "jitney" buses were per 
mitted to operate under the ordinary $25 annual motor li 
cense, as they desire to do, they would pay $1,650 yearlj 
and their operation would undoubtedly involve the city 1 
tremendous police expense for handling the traffic. 

It is said that nearly 85 per cent of the expenditures of th 
tramway company for combined construction and operatio 
are made locally for home products, materials, fuel an 
wages. Exactly the opposite, however, is true of the "jit 
ney" buses, for fully 85 per cent of their expenditures ar 
made abroad for autos, tires, gasoline and repair parts. A 
regards accidents, too, the "jitney" buses are reported to b 
leaving behind them a trail of killed, maimed and injured i: 
the Pacific coast cities, and the congestion in the street 
there has become dangerous and alarming. In summing u 
the case, Mr. Beeler states that the success of the "jitney 
bus depends upon their escaping the responsibility of payini 
for franchise rentals, street paving, grading, viaducts ani 
other public burdens that have fallen upon the street ca 
companies, and upon their stealing the cream of the trans 
portation business. If such buses want to compete wit: 
electric railways, they should be required to do so on equa 
terms and under equal conditions. 



THE COPPER ZONE SYSTEM 

New Fare Collection System of Union Traction Company o 
Indiana Working Satisfactorily 

Oflicials of the Union Traction Company of Indiana, whic' 
on Jan. 1 adopted the copper zone system for passenge 
fares, approved by the Public Service Commission of In 
diana, state that the new system is working out very satis 
factorily. With the introduction of the new zone plan a syster 
of cash fare receipts was inaugurated to take the place o 
the recording fare registers which have been in use on th 
interurban cars of the company, and the fare registers hav 
been removed from the cars. The fare receipts are ii 
duplicate, passenger's fare receipt and auditor's stub, num 
bered consecutively and bound in pads. At the end of eacl 
run the conductor turns in the duplicate receipts in ai 
envelope, and each day the stubs in the conductor's bool 
and the cash fares for the day are audited at the principa 
oflJices of the company at Anderson. 

The management of the company believes that the nev 
system of fare receipts is proving most satisfactory in ob 
taining an accurate accounting of all fares collected fron 
passengers on the cars. Since the new copper zone systen 
went into effect an increase has been shown in the numbe 
of passengers who purchase tickets before boarding the 
cars. In fact, it is estimated that more than 85 per cen 
of the passengers are now purchasing tickets at the sta 
tions. Under the new copper zone system the company filet 
tariffs which put into effect on its lines in Indiana rate 
which approximated 2 cents a mile for the actual distanC' 
traveled, with a minimum of 5 cents. Commutation ticket 
are sold in books of twenty round trips at the rate of IV 
cents a mile, and the sale of round-trip tickets at an amoum 
less than two full one-way fares was discontinued. Man; 
inequalities in the old nickel zone system have been elimi 
nated by the adoption of the new system. 



TICKET SALES AT BOOTHS IN KANSAS CITY i 

The middle of January the Metropolitan Street Railway 
Kansas City, Mo., built a booth at the corner curb line wher, 
passengers for and from the new union station are handlec, 
General agents of the company, as they are called, occup* 
this booth from the first regular car in the morning unt; 
midnight, chiefly to answer questions as to destination*! 
and routes, and to look after the running of the cars. Inc: 
dentally, tickets are sold at 5 cents each — no reduction fo 
quantities — at the booth. There was some doubt as to ho' 
extensively the opportunity to buy single-ride tickets woul 
be taken advantage of, but the feature has proved ver 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



311 



popular. Half-fare tickets are also sold at the booth. 
Heretofore the full-fare tickets have been purchased at the 
company's offices, chiefly by firms which provide their em- 
ployees with transportation. Conductors sell half -fare tick- 
ets only. 



No Reduction in TraflSc in Washington. — The Washington 
Railway & Electric Company has been informed by the 
Public Utilities Commission of the District of Columbia 
that observations made by its inspectors show that the 
service now in force is demanded by traffic conditions and 
must be continued. 

Chicago to Issue Official Booklet of Traffic Facts. — It was 

decided at a recent meeting of the committee on local trans- 
portation of the City Council of Chicago, 111., to authorize 
R. F. Kelker, Jr., traction supervisor, to prepare a booklet 
of facts hot generally known to the public regarding street 
railway service in the city. 

Brooklyn Inquiry Concluded. — The inquiry being con- 
ducted by the Public Service Commission of the First Dis- 
trict of New York into the adequacy of the service of the 
surface lines of the Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company was 
concluded on Feb. 1. The principal witness was Slaughter 
W. Huff, vice-president of the company. 

Louisville-Indianapolis Hearing. — The Louisville Board of 
Trade has received notification of indefinite postponement 
of the hearing before the Interstate Commerce Commission 
in connection with the reopened case against the Indian- 
apolis, Columbus & Southern Traction Company and other 
lines connecting with Indianapolis. The hearing was to 
have been held on Jan. 29. 

New Freight Rates. — The Mahoning & Shenango Railway 
& Light Company has filed a revision of its freight rates 
with the Interstate Commerce Commission and the Ohio 
and Pennsylvania commissions, to become effective on Feb. 
15. The new tariff provides for through rates over all lines 
of the system based on the distance freight is carried. A 
small increase is made in the rates for milk. 

New Indianapolis Traffic Ordinance. — The City Council 
of Indianapolis recently passed an ordinance, which is now 
being put into effect, requiring that all cars shall stop on 
signal on the far side as well as the near side of certain 
street intersections in the downtown district, where the 
distance over the crossing is very considerable on account 
of the intersection of wide north and south streets with 
diagonal avenues. 

Decision in Atlanta Service Case. — In its decision upon 
the petition of the Georgia Railway & Power Company, 
Atlanta, Ga., to curtail its service on fourteen lines in At- 
lanta, the State Railroad Commission has granted in full 
the prayer of the company for curtailments on two routes 
and granted in part or conditionally the company's petition 
regarding five other lines. The other seven lines were not 
allowed to be changed. 

New Street Rule in Detroit. — A new stopping ordinance 
has been passed recently in Detroit, Mich., which permits 
t the driver of a vehicle to pass between the running board 
I or lower step of a car headed in the same direction, when 
I stopping to discharge or take on passengers, provided there 
i is a 6-ft. clearance between the car step and the vehicle. 
I If it is not possible to allow this clearance the vehicle is 
required to stop at least 6 ft. from the rear end of the car. 
Change in Zone System Deiiied. — The Public Service Com- 
mission of Maryland has rendered a decision in the case of 
F. L. Hawley versus the City & Suburban Railway, Wash- 
ington, D. C. The question at issue was the division of the 
line for the boundary of the District of Columbia to Laurel 
into five zones with a cash fare of 5 cents for each. The 
complainant desired four zones with the same fare, but the 
commission decided that the Interstate Commerce Commis- 
sion under the Shreveport decision had the final authority in 
the matter, and it, in establishing six zones between Laurel 
and Washington, had already provided five between Laurel 
and the district boundary. 

Fares in Edmonton.^— The following fares were put into 
effect on the Edmonton (Alta.) Municipal Electric Railway 
on Dec. 15: Regular fare, 5 cents cash; tickets (lilac), five 
for 25 cents, good at all hours; tickets (brown), six for 25 



cents, good from 6 a. m. to 8 a. m., 12 noon to 2 p. m., 5 p. m. 
to 7 p. m., not good on Sundays or public holidays; children's 
tickets (green) from five to fourteen years, ten for 25 cents. 
Two children are permitted to travel on 5 cents cash or one 
regular ticket. A double fare is charged after midnight, 
payable in cash or tickets. Tickets intended for use by per- 
sons on city's business are sold at the rate of twenty-five 
for $1. 

Answer to Albany Suit. — Ledyard P. Hale, counsel to 
the Public Service Commission for the Second District of 
New York, has filed an answer to the writ of certiorari 
obtained by the United Traction Company, Albany, for a 
review of the commission's order requiring better service 
from the company in Albany. In the answer Mr. Hale de- 
nies that the commission's order is illegal or erroneous and 
states that a hearing is the proper method of offering 
any additional facts by the company and that a rehearing 
of the case is not necessary. The papers in the case will 
be printed immediately and an argument had before the 
Appellate Division in the first week of the term beginning 
March 2. 

Traffic Survey in New Orleans. — D. D. Curran, president 
of the New Orleans Railway & Light Company, New 
Orleans, La., has presented to the Mayor of that city a 
summary of a traffic survey of most of the lines of the 
company for the period from Dec. 7 to Dec. 12, inclusive. 
In its communication to the Mayor the company says that 
since making the check it has added twenty-one cars to the 
various lines of its system and at the present time is operat- 
ing a total of 443 cars daily, as compared with 422 for the 
same period of last year. In addition to this, the company 
has replaced fourteen large cars seating fifty-two persons 
each on the St. Charles and the Tulane Belt lines for four- 
teen smaller cars with a seating capacity of twenty-eight 
each. A traffic bureau has been organized to check traffic 
on all the lines of its system. 

Highway Accidents in New York and New Jersey. — One- 
third fewer deaths in January in the streets of New York 
than a year ago are reported by the National Highways 
Protective Society, which estimates that the traffic on the 
streets has fallen off 30 per cent, 10 per cent of which is 
commercial traffic. During January, 1915, sixteen children 
lost their lives, fourteen being killed by automobiles, one 
by electric railway and one by wagon. The total number 
of persons killed was thirty-one, of which number automo- 
biles killed twenty-three, electric railways four and wagons 
four. The number of persons killed on the streets and 
highways of New York State, outside of New York City, 
during the past month was eleven. Automobiles caused 
the death of seven and electric railways four, as compared 
with five by automobiles, five by electric railways and one 
by wagon in January, 1914. In New Jersey thirteen per- 
sons were killed by automobiles, as compared with eight 
during the month of January, 1914. Nine persons were 
killed at railroad grade crossings in New York and six in 
New Jersey during January. 

Fare Order Respite. — Under the stipulation reached re- 
cently by the officers and patrons of the Seattle-Everett 
Interurban Railway the order of the State Public Service 
Commission of Washington of Dec. 24, reducing the rate 
charged by the company from 3 cents to 2 cents per mile 
has been deferred for a period of six months. The stipula- 
tion will ask the commission to validate the old schedule of 
rates, except that the company will issue a twenty-five ride 
book from the city limits to Seattle, as follows: To Lake 
BalHnger and intermediate points at the rate of 2 cents a 
mile; to Esperance, at the rate of 2.1 cents a mile; to Seat- 
tle Heights, at the rate of 2.2 cents a mile; to Cedar Valley 
substation, at the rate of 2.3 cents a mile; to Alderwood 
Manor, at the rate of 2.4 cents a mile; from the city limits 
of Everett to Silver Lake and intermediate points, at the 
rate of 2 cents a mile; the minimum fare in the case of a 
twenty-five ride ticket book to be 5 cents, the coupons to 
be good for transportation when presented with the book. 
The twenty-five ride ticket book, if continued beyond the 
term of six months' trial period, is to be good for one year 
from the date of sale. Pending a six months' trial of this 
experiment, no action will be taken upon the commission's 
order or the company's petition for rehearing. 



312 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 6 



Personal Mention 

Mr. C. W. Colvin has been appointed transmission engi- 
neer of the British Columbia Electric Railway, Vancouver, 
B. C. 

Mr. C. A. Hoag, who has been the assistant secretary and 
assistant treasurer of the Hagerstown & Frederick Railway, 
Hagerstown, Md., has resigned. 

Mr. Alexander Armstrong, Jr., was elected assistant treas- 
urer of the Hagerstown & Frederick Railway, Frederick, Md., 
to succeed Mr. C. A. Hoag, resigned. 

Mr. J. L, Baird, heretofore assistant secretary and treas- 
urer of the Windsor, Essex & Lake Shore Rapid Railway, 
Windsor, Ont., has been appointed auditor. 

Mr. Carl D. Jackson, Oshkosh, has been confirmed by the 
Wisconsin Senate as the successor to Mr. John H. Roemer 
on the Railroad Commission of that State. 

Mr. C. Loop, who has been acting roadmaster of the 
Windsor, Essex & Lake Shore Rapid Railway, Windsor, 
Ont., for the last year, has been appointed roadmaster. 

Mr. A. R. Keele, heretofore assistant dispatcher of the 
Windsor, Essex & Lake Shore Rapid Railway, Windsor, 
Ont., has been appointed chief dispatcher of the company. 

Mr. C. D. Flanigan, vice-president and general manager 
of the Athens Railway & Electric Company, Athens, Ga., 
has been elected president of the Athens Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

Mr. George Bullock has been elected chairman of the 
board of directors of the United Gas & Electric Engineer- 
ing Corporation, New York, N. Y. He was formerly presi- 
dent of that company. 

Mr. W. L. Palmer has resigned as claim agent for the 
Illinois Northern Utilities Company, at Dixon, 111., to become 
claim agent for the Terra Haute division of the Terra 
Haute, Indianapolis & Eastern Traction Company. 

Mr. A. Baltzer, heretofore shop foreman of the Windsor, 
Essex & Lake Shore Rapid Railway, Windsor, Ont., has been 
appointed master mechanic of the company in charge of 
shops and all work in connection therewith. 

Mr. S. J. Dill, vice-president of the United Gas & Electric 
Engineering Corporation, New York, N. Y., has been placed 
in charge of the work of that company in the South, "with 
headquarters at 201 Baronne Street, New Orleans, La. 

Mr. Charles C. Mumford, one of the trustees of the Rhode 
Island Company, Providence, R. I., appointed by the Federal 
Department of Justice, has been elected president of the 
leased Providence & Danielson Railway to succeed Mr. D. F. 
Sherman. 

Mr. C. P. Cooper has been appointed superintendent of 
the Windsor, Essex & Lake Shore Rapid Railway, Windsor, 
Ont., in charge of general operation. He has been with the 
company in various capacities from its construction days, 
and has been chief dispatcher for four years. 

Mr. S. H. Bennett, general auditor Hagerstown & Fred- 
erick Railway, Frederick, Md., was elected assistant secre- 
tary of the company at the recent annual meeting, to succeed 
Mr. C. A. Hoag, resigned. Mr. Bennett will, in addition to 
this office, continue to hold that of general auditor. 

Mr. J. S. Pevear, formerly president of the New Orleans 
Railway & Light Company, New Orleans, La., has been 
elected president of the United Gas & Electric Engineering 
Corporation, New York, N. Y., to succeed Mr. George Bul- 
lock, who has been elected chairman of the board of di- 
rectors. 

Mr. F. Howard Warfield, trust officer of the Fidelity Trust 
Company, Baltimore, Md., was elected vice-president of the 
Hagerstown & Frederick Railway, Frederick, Md., at the 
recent annual meeting of the railway. This office is a new 
one in addition to the vice-presidency held by Mr. Henry 
Holzapfel, who was re-elected. 

Mr. F. S. Barnard, Victoria, B. C, who has been appointed 
Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia, was born at To- 
ronto, Ont., on May 16, 1856, and has been associated with 
the British Columbia Electric Railway for many years, act- 



ing recently as local adviser to the directors, most of whom 
reside in London, England. 

Mr. Beecher W. Waltermire, an attorney of Findlay, has 
been appointed by Governor Willis to succeed Mr. E. W. Doty 
as a member of the Ohio Public Utilities Commission. Mr. 
Doty's term expired on Feb. 1. Mr. Waltermire was a can- 
didate for lieutenant-governor in 1912 and has been suc- 
cessful on the lecture platform. He took part in the cam- 
paign for Governor Willis. 

Mr. Pope Y. White, who has been appointed editor of the 
United Railways Bulletin, published in the interest of the 
employees of the United Railways, St. Louis, Mo., was 
engaged in daily newspaper work for fourteen years, ad- 
vancing from reporter to telegraph editor, make-up editor, 
news editor and finally city editor, which place on the St. 
Louis Times he resigned to become connected with the 
United Railways. 

Mr. Walter Alexander, Milwaukee, has been nominated 
as a member of the Railroad Commission of Wisconsin to 
succeed Mr. David Harlowe. For the last five years Mr. 
Alexander has been district master mechanic for the Chi- 
cago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway with headquarters at 
Milwaukee. Previous to this time he served on the faculties 
of the University of Wisconsin, Armour Institute and the 
University of Missouri. 

Mr. Hugh McCloskey has resigned as chairman of the 
board of directors of the New Orleans Railway & Light 
Company, New Orleans, La. Mr. McCloskey was elected 
chairman of the board of the company and president of the 
American Cities Company in October, 1913. He first be- 
came identified with railway work in New Orleans as a 
member of the board of directors of one of the subsidiary 
companies under the New Orleans Railway & Light Com- 
pany. 

Mr. Russell A. Sears, to whom was awarded the silver rep- 
lica of the Anthony N. Brady safety medal, was born in New 
York in 1869, but was educated in the Boston public schools. 

He was admitted to the 
Massachusetts Bar in 1890 
and for fifteen years was 
associated in law practice 
with Samuel L. Powers. He 
resides at Quincy, Mass., of 
which he was Mayor in 
1898 and city solicitor in 
1900 and 1901. He had ear- 
ly association with various 
street railways now com- 
prising the Middlesex & 
Boston Street Railway be- 
fore its consolidation with 
some of the street railways 
now included in the Bay 
State Street Railway. He 
has been associated with 
the Boston Elevated Rail- 
way as general attorney 
since October, 1902. In addition to his Boston Elevated ac-: 
tivities, Mr. Sears is a director of the Massachusetts Em-p 
ployees' Insurance Association, the Granite Trust Company 
and the Citizens' Gas Light Company. Mr. Sears was nomi-i 
nated by his company to receive the safety award because hej 
has taken a leading part in accident reduction. In addition 
to the activities mentioned elsewhere in this issue he has 
developed the machinery of his department to promote safe 
operation. For example, the department diligently prose- 
cutes in the criminal courts all persons who make traveling 
upon the cars unpleasant and dangerous. Again, in connec- 
tion with the department, accident clerks are appointed tr 
spend their time in carhouses and lobbies instructing em- 
ployees on safety matters. Mr. Sears supervises the wort 
of the general secretary of safety committees. He has alsc 
organized a number of public campaigns, among them beinc 
one against the stealing of rides and the jumping on -..m 
off cars. Another was one to stimulate the writing u 
safety verses in the schools by means of a prize contest 
A special campaign against drunkenness upon street ca 
gave excellent results. 




R. A. SEARS 



cux 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



313 




Mr. William W. Chisholm, who has been appointed elec- 
trical engineer of the Windsor, Essex & Lake Shore Rapid 
Kiiilway, Kingsville, Ont., was born at Caradoc, Ont., on 
Oct. 17, 1876. He entered railway service in June, 1896, 
and to April, 1897, was switchman on the Michigan Central 
Railroad, St. Thomas, Ont. From April, 1897, to March, 
1 ^;I8, he was yard conductor and assistant yardmaster of 
the Toronto, Hamilton & Buffalo Railway, Hamilton, Ont. 
i' lom March, 1898, to June, 1903, he was brakeman of the 
.Michigan Central Railroad, St. Thomas, Ont. In May, 1905, 
he became assistant chief engineer of the city pumping sta- 
tion at St. Thomas, Ont., and since November, 1907, he has 
leen chief engineer of the power plant of the Windsor, 
Essex & Lake Shore Rapid Railway, Kingsville, Ont. 

Mr. Henry V. Neal, to whom was recently awarded the 
bronze replica of the Anthony N. Brady medal, is sixty-six 
years of age. He has been in the employ of the Boston Ele- 
vated Railway for twenty- 
one years and is at present 
a mechanic in the Albany 
Street shops. Before com- 
ing to the Boston Elevated 
Railway, he was in the em- 
ploy of the Hinckley Loco- 
motive Works for thirteen 
years and the Boston & Al- 
bany Railroad for nine 
years, and was actively in- 
terested in the emergency 
work of the latter company. 
Mr. Neal for many years 
has been deeply interested 
in medical matters. In the 
early eighties, while with 
the Hinckley Company he 
took a course of emergency jj y_ neal 

lectures, and later helped to 

organize an emergency class while with the Boston & Albany 
Railroad. In connection with this work he acted as assist- 
ant demonstrator during another lecture course. All of this 
preparation has well fitted Mr. Neal to take up his present 
activities, which are mentioned in connection with the digest 
I of the Brady medal committee report elsewhere in this issue. 

[ OBITUARY 

I James D. Parker, one of the promoters of the Sandusky, 
. Milan & Norwalk Electric Railway, now included in the 
I system of the Lake Shore Electric Railway, Cleveland, Ohio, 
■ is dead. 

John C. Brewster, superintendent of construction during 

I the building of the Muskegon (Mich.) Street Railway, now 

I included in the system of the Muskegon Traction & Light 

Company, is dead. Mr. Brewster was born on June 5, 1829, 

in New York. He located in Muskegon in 1869 as a civil 

engineer. He was interested in the construction of the 

'■ Chicago & Michigan Railroad and the Grarnd Rapids & 

' Indiana Railway. 

John Wesley Richardson, general superintendent of the 
Kansas City-Western Railway, Kansas City, Kan., is dead. 
Mr. Richardson was born at Freeman, Mo., on March 25, 
1867. When seventeen years old he entered the employ of 
Holmes Brothers with the local railway lines in Kansas 
City. Later he became superintendent of one of the divi- 
sions of the Metropolitan Street Railway in Kansas City, 
and in June, 1905, was made general superintendent of the 
Kansas City-Western Railway. 

John M. Mack, financier and contractor, who took a 
prominent part in the organization of the Philadelphia 
(Pa.) Rapid Transit Company, is dead. Mr. Mack was born 
in Philadelphia on Aug. 15, 1852. He was educated in the 
public schools there and in 1872 began business as a con- 
tractor. He was largely responsible for organizing the 
Asphalt Company of America. He was formerly president 
and a director of the Barber Asphalt Paving Company, the 
General Asphalt Company, the Mack Paving & Construc- 
tion Company, the Norwich Compressed-Air Power Com- 
pany, the Hamburg Vitrified Brick Company, the Railways 
Company General, and was president of the Manhattan 
Trap Rock Company. Mr. Mack retired some time ago 
from active business. 



Construction News 

Construction News Notes are classified under each head- 
ing alphabetically by States. 

An asterisk (*) indicates a project not previously re- 
ported. 

RECENT INCORPORATIONS 
*McConnellsburg & Fort London Railway, McConnells- 
burg. Pa. — Application for a charter has been made by this 
company in Pennsylvania to build an electric railway be- 
tween McConnellsburg, Pa., and Fort London in Peters 
Township, Pa. Incorporators: Edward J. Post, D. H. Pat- 
terson, Herbert A. Duffy, George A. Harris and B. C. 
Lamberson. 

Portland, Vancouver & Northern Railway, Vancouver, 
Wash. — Chartered in Washington to build an electric rail- 
way between Portland, Ore., and Vancouver, Wash. Capi- 
tal stock, $300,000. Henry Crass, 511 United States Bank 
Building, Vancouver, Wash., president, and G. W. Ford, 
Vancouver, secretary. [E. R. J., Jan. 19, '15.] 

FRANCHISES 

Fresno, Cal. — The Fresno Interurban Railway has asked 
the Council for a franchise over certain streets in Fresno. 

Los Angeles, Cal. — Upon being informed that the Los 
Angeles Railway corporation is desirous of removing cer- 
tain tracks on Thirty-ninth Street, which is to form an en- 
trance to Exposition Park, the Park Commission has ap- 
proved new plans for the street approach to the park in 
question. 

Riverside, Cal. — Floyd Brown and associates have asked 
the Board of Supervisors for a fifty-year franchise to build 
an electric railway along the county highway in Riverside, 
and by motion it was decided to advertise for bids on the 
franchise to be opened March 3. 

*Santa Barbara, Cal. — Application has been made to the 
City Council by Richard Hamilton Gaud for a franchise 
granting the right to construct an electric railway upon 
certain streets in Santa Barbara until March 15, 1957. 
The Council will receive sealed bids up to Feb. 18 for the 
franchiKe. 

Murphysboro, 111. — The Murphysboro & Southern Illinois 
Railway will ask the Mayor and City Council for a franchise 
in Murphysboro on Feb. 9. 

Albany, N. Y.— The International Railway has received 
permission by the Public Service Commission in Albany to 
construct its high-speed electric line between Buffalo and 
Niagara Falls. Permission was also given the railway to 
issue 3 per cent fifty-year refunding and improvement 
mortgage bonds for $2,395,000 to be sold at not less than 87. 
The new line is to start in Buffalo at the intersection of the 
Buffalo & Lockport line and run out Main Street through 
Tonawanda over the old Buffalo, Thousand Islands & Port- 
land Railroad line, through North Tonawanda, Wheatfleld, 
La Salle into Niagara Falls. 

Buffalo, N. Y. — The Frontier Electric Railway has re- 
ceived a franchise to extend its lines across Kenmore Ave- 
nue, Main Street and intervening streets in Buffalo. 

Buffalo, N. Y. — The International Railway has accepted 
the franchise recently granted it by the Tonawanda Com- 
mon Council giving it the right to build a double-track 
line from Buffalo to Niagara Falls. In the acceptance, 
the company placed a clause giving it the right to cancel 
the grant at any time before the building of the new line 
is begun. The company will also accept the North Tona- 
wanda franchise on the same condition. 

*Clymer, N. Y. — The Columbus & Mayville Railroad has 
asked the Council for a franchise in Clymer. This is part 
of a plan to build an electric railway between Jamestown 
and Clymer. 

New Rochelle, N. Y. — The trolley committee of the City 
Club of New Rochelle has asked the Council to grant the 
Westchester Electric Railway a franchise to build a new 
electric line from Mount Vernon through Winyah Avenue, 
to connect the end of the line in North Pelham with North 
Avenue, and to extend these cars to Hudson Park and 
double-track Franklin Avenue. 



314 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 6 



East Linden, Ohio. — On Jan. 27 the commissioners of 
Franklin County granted the East Linden Electric Railway 
a franchise for a line between the Leonard Avenue viaduct 
in Columbus and East Linden. Work must be begun within 
two years and the fare is to be 5 cents until the net income 
excfeeds 6 per cent on the investment, when it is to be re- 
duced to the rate of six tickets for 25 cents. Further de- 
crease of the fare is provided as the income increases. 

Toronto, Ont. — The City Council has authorized the issue 
of debentures to the amount of $455,961 for civic lines in 
Toronto. The City Council authorized the issue of deben- 
tures, amounting to $66,418, for acquiring the portion of 
the Scarboro division of the Toronto & York Radial Railway 
within the city limits. 

McConnellsburg, Pa. — The McConnellsburg & Fort Lon- 
don Railway has received a fifty-year franchise from the 
Council in McConnellsburg. This is part of a plan to build 
an electric line between McConnellsburg and Fort London. 

*Knoxville, Tenn. — M. K. Bell has asked the County Court 
for a franchise for an electric interurban railway from 
Knoxville to Bristol and Newport. 

Seattle, Wash. — The City Council of Seattle has voted 
to submit at the March election the ordinance of Council- 
man Erickson to extend Division A of the municipal elec- 
tric railway into Ballard. 

TRACK AND ROADWAY 

Gadsden, Ala. — Application for a charter will soon be 
made by Louis Hart to build an electric railway from 
Gadsden to Centre. It is expected the capital stock will 
be at least $250,000, although the preliminary organization 
of the company may be effected on a smaller amount. Prop- 
erty holders of Centre are greatly interested in the project 
and will give material assistance. Power will be purchased 
from the Alabama Power Company. [E. R. J., Jan. .30, '15.] 

Mobile Light & Railroad Company, Mobile, Ala. — This 
company has in contemplation extensive improvements of 
its lines provided the franchise rights are secured. The 
company has been considering these improvements for some 
time, and it is expected that if the proper negotiations are 
completed the work will begin in the near future. 

Tramways Company, Ltd., Edmonton, Alta. — The agree- 
ment between the Edmonton City Council and this company 
has been ratified by the ratepayers. The directors are: 
A. E. Farncomb, president; H. Stutchbury, S. D. Hogan, 
G. G. Reedwell, S. Carson, W. Golley and S. H. Smith. It 
is reported that the company has already graded several- 
miles from the city limits and has bought right-of-way 
from the landholders along the side of the road allowance. 

San Jose & Almaden Railway, San Jose, CaL — The project 
to build a 12-mile electric line between Almaden, San Jose 
and Hacienda has been abandoned. [E. R. J., Sept. 28, '12.] 

Jacksonville, Fla. — The new interurban electric railway 
from Jacksonville to Middleburg, on which construction was 
recently begun, in addition to being in shape to go ahead 
with its building for the first 10 miles, has the co-operation 
of every land owner along the line. These have con- 
tracted to give time, labor and ties, in addition to offering 
to take stock in the company as soon as the organization 
is completed. 

Miami (Fla.) Traction Company. — Work has been resumed 
by this company on its line in Miami. It is planned to have 
2 miles of track laid by March 1. B. B. Tatum, Miami, 
president. [E. R. J., Nov. 21, '14.] 

Tarpon Springs, Fla. — Plans to build an interurban rail- 
way from Tarpon Springs to St. Petersburg are under con- 
sideration. The line will be 12 miles long and will be oper- 
ated with gasoline motive power. M. L. Waggoner, Third 
Avenue, South, St. Petersburg, is interested. [E. R. J., 
April 25, '14.] 

Macon Railway & Light Company, Macon, Ga. — The work 
of relocating the track on College Street, removing it from 
the lower edge of Tattnall Square and placing it in the 
center of the street, will be begun at once by this company. 

Union Traction Company, Coffeyville, Kan. — This com- 
pany has placed in operation its extension to Nowata. 
Other extensions are contemplated. 



Manhattan, Kan. — Municipal bonds to the amount of 
$20,000, voted in 1910 as a bonus to the Manhattan City & 
Interurban Railway when it should complete a line to Fort 
Riley, were turned over to the traction company on Jan. 23, 
the line having been placed in operation three months ago. 

Arkansas Valley Interurban Railway, Wichita, Kan. — 
Plans are being considered to build soon the extension to 
Hutchinson. Extensions to Great Bend, Larned and other 
western towns are also being considered and plans are also 
contemplated for extensions northward, probably to Mc- 
Pherson and Salina. 

Kentucky Traction & Terminal Company, Lexington, Ky. 
— Orders have been placed by this company with the Hard- 
wick Lumber Company, Winchester, for 30,000 crossties, 
which are for use in the reconstruction of the railway. 

Louisville & Interurban Railway, Louisville, Ky. — Plans 
are being made by this company for a 7-mile extension from 
Fern Creek to Mount Washington. 

Louisville (Ky.) Railway. — There will be no extension of 
the Walnut Street line in Louisville from the present ter- 
minal in Parkland to the State Fair grounds at the present 
time. The board of directors of the company so decided 
at their regular January meeting recently. 

Southwestern Traction & Power Company, New Iberim, 
La. — Plans are being made for the construction of an elec- 
tric railroad from New Iberia, La., to St. Martinville, a 
distance of 10.5 miles, also from Jeanerette, La., through 
Franklin, Baldwin and Patterson, to Berwich, a distance of 
50 miles. No contracts have been let, but it is expected 
that work will soon be begun. W. S. Henning, New Iberia, 
La., is chief engineer. 

*New Orleans, La. — Plans are being made to build a 
double-track electric railway for the section of the city 
below Canal Street. Among those interested are: Charles 
Torreogrossa and Joseph F. Ebert, New Orleans. 

Orleans-Kenner Electric Railway, New Orleans, La. — 
Work has been begun by this company on the construction 
of the Metairie Ridge loop line in New Orleans. [E. R. J., 
Jan. 9, '15.] 

Shreveport (La.) Traction Company. — Plans are being 
made to build an extension from Waverly to South High- 
lands, about 1% miles, in Shreveport. 

Asbury Park, N. J. — Harry W. Smock, retiring president 
of the (ihamber of Commerce, is reported as stating that 
the recently talked of Trenton to Asbury Park electric rail- 
way is now assured. He announces that the line will run 
through Allentown, Lakewood, Farmingdale and Hamilton 
and thus into Asbury Park with a spur from Lakewood to 
Point Pleasant. The project will go through, he assured 
chamber members, without local financial aid. 

Trenton & Mercer County Traction Company, Trenton, 

N. J. — Wilbur residents are agitating the extension of the 
Hamilton Avenue line into East Trenton. The present 
terminus of this branch is Olden Avenue and State Street. 
The plan is to have the tracks extended to the corner of 
Clinton Avenue and Olden Avenue. 

Western New York & Pennsylvania Traction Company, 
Olean, N. Y. — This company has been asked to buy the 
Buffalo-Susquehanna Railway extending between Buffalo 
and Wellsville. The proposition is to electrify the Buffalo- 
Susquehanna Railway which would provide an outlet into 
Buffalo. It is understood the Chamber of Commerce of 
Olean and the towns of Friendship, Franklinville, Wells- 
ville and others would aid such an undertaking. 

Goldsboro, N. C. — The House of Representatives at Ra- 
leigh, N. C, has passed on third reading the bill au- 
thorizing the city of Goldsboro to issue bonds for municipal 
street railway purposes. ■ 

Pictou County Electric Company, Ltd., Stellarton, N. S.— 4 

This company has under consideration the construction of 
an extension from Potiers Bridge to Pardale, N. S., % mile. 
L. T. Flaherty, New Glasgow, N. S., manager. 

Youngstown & Southern Railway, Youngstown, Ohio. — - 

David Tod, receiver for this railway, has announced that j 
the line will be double tracked from Youngstown to South- ■ 
ern Park, where the racetrack is located. He will soon ask 
the Council for a franchise for this work. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



315 



Toronto (Ont.) Eastern Railway. — This company has an 
a[)i)lication before the Dominion Parliament asking for an 
ixtension of time for completing the line authorized to be 
built from Toronto easterly to Cobourg, Ont., with branches 
as follows: From Cobourg or Port Hope northerly to Peter- 
rough; from Scarborough to Markham, Stouffville or Ux- 
iilge; from Oshawa northerly via Lake Scugog to Lind- 
ay; from Oshawa southerly to Lake Ontario. 

Niagara, Welland & Lake Erie Railway, Welland, Ont. — 
This company has an application before the Ontario Legis- 
lature for the confirmation of an agreement granting the 
riyht to the company to operate a railway in Welland, and 
the confirmation of a second agreement fixing the assess- 
ment of the company's property there at specific sums for 
five-year periods, terminating in 1934. 

Portland & Oregon City Railway, Portland, Ore. — This 
railway will be completed and in operation to Baker's 
Bridge, 16 miles from Portland end, early this spring, 

Lancaster & Berks Electric Railway, Lancaster, Pa. — 

Plans are being contemplated by this company to change 
its route to Womelsdorf for the proposed spur line that 
was to have been laid from Kleinfeltersville to Womelsdorf. 
It has been stated that the line will now be constructed 
along an altogether different route, passing through Reist- 
ville, Richland and Stricklerstov^m. It is said that the reason 
for abandoning the original project is that the right-of- 
way could not be secured at a nominal cost. The new spur 
would connect with the Ephrata & Lebanon lines. 

Montreal (Que.) Tramways Company. — The Quebe.c 
Legislature is being asked by the town of Mount Royal for 
an extension of time within which it may make arrange- 
ments with this company and the Montreal Public Service 
Corporation for the building of electric railways, etc. 

Columbia Railway, Gas & Electric Company, Columbia, 
S. C. — In advance of the paving of Elmwood Avenue by the 
city, this company will lay a new track down Elmwood 
Avenue and erect concrete poles. The company will soon 
replace the wooden poles on Lady Street with iron poles. 

Brenham, Tex. — Washington will join in the project to 
build an interurban electric railway from Brenham via 
William Penn and Independence, thence through the Brazos 
section. This will add 6 miles more to the route already 
surveyed. Outside capital is very much interested in the 
construction of this interurban line. L. M. Hewitt, Bryan, 
is interested. [E. R. J., Jan. 30, '15.] 

El Paso Electric Belt Line, El Paso, Tex. — No definite 
plans have yet been formulated by this company for the 
construction of its proposed electric railway from the center 
of El Paso through suburbs to Woodlawn addition, east of 
El Paso. Thomas P. Ruddy, Kansas City, is interested. 
[E. R. J., Nov. 14, '14.] 

San Angelo (Tex.) Street Railway. — Plans are being con- 
sidered by this company to extend its lines in San Angelo 
to Austin, a distance of about 75 miles. 

Lynchburg Traction & Light Company, Lynchburg, Va. — 
This company contemplates the construction of an exten- 
sion to Madison Heights over the proposed viaduct from 
Seventh Street and Commerce Street across the James 
River in Lynchburg. 

•Radford, Va. — Plans for the construction of an electric 
railway from Willis, in Floyd County, to Radford, Va., 28 
miles, are being considered by residents of that county and 
the Radford Board of Trade. It is understood that Floyd 
County people will subscribe about $100,000 to the stock of 
a company which may be formed to build the railway, and 
that they will pay for it in crossties and labor. A. J. Mc- 
Clung, secretary of the Radford Board of Trade, may be able 
to give further information. 

Tacoma (Wash.) Municipal Railway. — The first line of 
this railway has been placed in operation in Tacoma. It 
will be known as the Tide Flats line and will operate from 
Pacific Avenue and Eleventh Street to the shops of the 
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway. The line will be 
operated under lease by the Stone & Webster Corporation. 

West Virginia Traction & Electric Company, Wheeling, 
W. Va. — It has been officially stated that this company is 
contemplating many improvements of its lines in Wheeling 
during 1915. 



SHOPS AND BUILDINGS 

Kankakee & Urbana Traction Company, Urbana, 111. — 

T. W. Shelton, superintendent of this company, has just 
completed the plans for a new station for the company at 
Rantoul. It will be on the site of the present structure. 
Work will be begun as soon as the weather will permit. 
The new structure will be of brick, 20 ft. x 50 ft., and so 
arranged that 100 ft. more can be added to it when neces- 
sary. The front will be used as a waiting room for pas- 
sengers, and in the center will be the ticket office. The 
rear part will be used as a freight room, switches being run 
to it to make loading and unloading easy. 

Berkshire Street Railway, Pittsfield, Mass. — This com- 
pany has opened a new passenger station in Pittsfield. 

Piedmont & Northern Railway, Charlotte, N. C— The 
offices of this company have been moved from the former 
place on Main Street to the new office on Washington 
Street over the new depot. 

Cleveland (Ohio) Railway. — Plans are being made by this 
company to ask the City Council for permission to purchase 
19 acres of land near the Big Four Railroad at Denison 
Avenue and Ridge Avenue in Cleveland on which the com- 
pany plans to build new carhouses. The land will cost 
$60,000. 

Texas Traction Company, Dallas, Tex.— Negotiations are 
now being conducted between the Southern Traction Com- 
pany and Texas Traction Company, of Dallas, and the Dal- 
las Interurban Terminal Association for the right of the 
cars of the lines mentioned to use the shed and station 
privileges of the new interurban terminal station which the 
association will erect. This is one of the most important 
details of the erection of the new interurban terminal sta- 
tion by the Stone & Webster interests. It was the former 
purpose of the Strickland-Goodwin Managerial Association, 
controlling the operation of the Texas and Southern Trac- 
tion companies, to build a station of their own out of the 
present Santa Fe depot at Commerce and Murphy Streets. 
They bought control of this property some months ago. 
If the new contract is made, their plans will probably be 
changed. The Southern Traction and Texas Traction 
Companies hold franchises on Commerce Street at 
the present time, so that no changes would have to be made 
in order to reach the new stations. The franchise on the 
streets entering the station itself is a blanket franchise, 
issued to the association, covering all lines. 

POWER HOUSES AND SUBSTATIONS 
United Railroads of San Francisco, San Francisco, Cal.— 

Work will shortly be begun by this company on the con- 
struction of a new substation on Eighth Avenue, near Geary 
Street, in San Francisco. This substation is designed to 
handle all cars operated in the Richmond district. The ulti- 
mate capacity of the new substation will be 6000-kw, 
equivalent to approximately 10,000 hp. 

Rockingham Light & Power Company, Portsmouth, N. H. 

— The electric machinery, formerly in use at the power 
house of the Portsmouth & Exeter Street Railway, now 
abandoned, at Stratham, is being moved by the Rockingham 
Light & Power Company to Portsmouth, where it will be 
installed at the Daniel Street plant and connected up with 
the power lines. The lot includes a rotary converter, 
transformers, switchboards and other equipment. 

Toronto (Ont.) Suburban Street Railway. — Contracts have 
been awarded by this company for three substations on its 
Toronto to Guelph line, at Islington, Georgetown and 
Guelph, Ont. The latter will have 1000-kw. capacity, in 
two 500-kw units, while each of the other two will have a 
single 500-kw unit, with provisions for the addition of a 
similar unit in the future. Power will be received at 
25,000 volts, alternating current, three-phase, twenty-five- 
cycle, and will be stepped down and passed through 500-kw 
rotary converters, which will deliver to the line at 1500 
volts direct current. The Georgetown and Guelph stations 
will contain waiting, baggage and express rooms and dis- 
patching offices, providing railway station facilities. 

San Angelo (Tex.) Street Railway. — Plans are being con- 
sidered by this company to build a new power house in San 
Angelo. 



316 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 6 



Manufactures and Supplies 

ROLLING STOCK 

Reading (Pa.) Transit & Light Companj' is contemplating 
the purchase of a few cars. 

Iowa Railway & Light Company, Boone, la., is reported as 
expecting to buy four cars. 

International Railway, Buffalo, N. Y., is reported as figur- 
ing on buying twenty-five. cars. 

Sioux City (la.) Service Company is reported as expecting 
possibly to rebuild five city cars. 

Oakwood Street Railway, Dayton, Ohio, is reported as ex- 
pecting to rebuild cars in its own shops. 

Columbia (S. C.) Railway, Gas & Electric Company is re- 
ported as expecting to purchase new cars. 

Dayton & Troy Electric Railway, Dayton, Ohio, is reported 
as expecting to buy three interurban cars. 

Birmingham & Tuscaloosa Railway & Utilities Company, 
Tuscaloosa, Ala., during 1915 will purchase four passenger 
cars. 

Somerset Traction Company, Skowhegan, Me., expects to 
purchase one semi-convertible combination passenger and 
baggage car. 

Columbus Railway & Light Company, Columbus, Ohio, is 
rumored as considering the possible purchase of twenty-five 
or fifteen city cars. 

Hagerstown & Frederick Electric Railway, Frederick, Md.. 
has ordered two electric freight locomotives of 25 tons each 
from the General Electric Company. 

Arkansas Valley Interurban Railway, Wichita, Kan., noted 
in the Electric Railway Journal of Jan. 30, 1915, as ex- 
pecting to purchase one car, has ordered this equipment from 
the Cincinnati Car Company. 

Tampa & Gulf Coast Railway, Tampa, Fla., contemplates 
either electric storage-battery or gasoline motor car opera- 
tion on its recently completed line between Tampa and St. 
Petersburg, Fla. Other cars will be purchased for similar 
t;ervice between Tarpon Springs and Port Richey. 

Union Electric Company, Dubuque, la., which operates all 
the electric utilities in that city, placed in service during 
1914 two electric buses which run on a twenty-minute sched- 
ule between Dubuque, la., and East Dubuque, 111. This 
service, which could not be furnished in any other manner, 
has proved so popular that an order has recently been 
placed with the General Vehicle Company, Long Island City, 
N. Y., for a third bus. 

Shore Line Electric Railway, Norwich, Conn., has speci- 
fied the following details for the ten semi-convertible cars 
recently ordered from the Wason Manufacturing Company: 

Date of delivery, Control West. H. L. 

during May Couplers West C-I 

Seating capacity 52 Curtain fixtures National 

Weight of car body, Curtain material . . . Pantasote 

20,000 lb. Gongs Dedenda 

Bolster centers 24 ft. Hand brakes. 

Length of body over corner Peacock, no staff 

posts 36 ft. Heaters Consol. 

Length over vestibule. Headlights Golden Glow 

45 ft. 5 in. Motors four, inside hung 

Height, rail to floor. .40% in. Registers No. 5 Sterling 

Height, floor to trolley board, Sanders Sterling 

8 ft. 4% in. Sash fixtures Brill 

Width over sills... 8 ft. 2 in. Seating material rattan 

Width over all 8 ft. 4 in. Springs Brill 

Body metal Steps Stanwood 

Interior trim mahogany Trolley Catchers. .Earll No. 7 

Headlining Agasote Trolley base U. S. No. 15 

Roof arch Trucks. . .Brill No. 27 MCB 1 

Underframe metal Ventilators Brill 

Airbrakes West. S. M. E. Wheels Midvale, 34 in. 

Metropolitan Street Railway Company, Kansas City, Mo., 
has advised through the board of control that it will let 
a contract on Feb. 8 for fifty new cars to be delivered April 
15. Specifications call for single-end, double-truck cars 
with an inclosed rear door and folding step with motor- 
man's red light signal for starting the car. White enamel 
decorating is to be used and 50 per cent more heaters will 



be provided than have been in use on the Metropolitan's 
cars. The wheel height is to be reduced from 33 in. to 30 
in. in order to save space and facilitate boarding and 
alighting. 

TRADE NOTES 

Lorain Steel Company, Johnstown, Pa., has just received 
an order from the International Railway, Buffalo, N. Y., foj 
5300 tons of 9-in. girder rail. No. 124—432. 

Electric Controller & Manufacturing Company, Cleveland, 
Ohio, announces that the O. H. Davidson Equipment Com- 
pany, Ideal Building, Denver, Colo., will act as its repre- 
sentative in Colorado, Utah, Montana, Wyoming, South 
Dakota, New Mexico and Arizona. 

H. Bortin, formerly engineer in charge of valuation de- 
partment of Union Pacific Railroad for four years, and 
member of its valuation committee; lately assistant to gen- 
eral secretary of Presidents' Conference Committee on P^ed- 
eral Valuation of the Railroads, announces his entry into 
private practice as consulting valuation engineer, with of- 
fice at 149 Broadway, New York City. 

Guy E. Marion, secretary-treasurer of the Special 
Libraries Association, has resigned from Arthur D. Little, 
Inc., chemists, engineers and managers, 93 Broad Street, 
Boston, Mass., where he has been located for the last 
five years in charge of its information department. Mr. 
Marion will devote himself to the organization and de- 
velopment of special libraries, or information departments, 
in business houses, industrial plants, etc. 

American Manufacturing Company, Chattanooga, Tenn., 
of which J. B. Robinson is president, manufacturer of hard- 
ware specialties, such as electrically welded wire oven 
racks, etc., has recently purchased the plant and equipment 
of the Owensboro Shovel & Tool Company, Owensboro, Ky., 
of which J. W. McCulloch was president. The equipment 
has been installed in the Chattanooga manufacturer's plant 
and will be ready for operation in a few weeks. 

Edison Storage Battery Company, Orange, N. J., has ap- 
pointed Charles E. Poyer as assistant general sales man- 
ager. Mr. Poyer has been with the Edison interests for 
about four years, having served first on the personal 
engineering staff of Mr. Edison in the development of 
special application of the alkaline battery, and later as 
assistant advertising manager. For the past two years 
he has been manager of the house lighting department. 

British Westinghouse Eectric & Manufacturing Company, 
Ltd., Manchester, England, will purchase the Societe Ano- 
nyme Westinghouse, Havre, France, and the Societa Italiana 
Westinghouse, Genoa, Italy. The English company, it is re- 
ported, will take over the Continental companies purely as a 
matter of business policy, and not as an expedient under 
which to furnish war materials for the Allies. The Ameri- 
can company, by virtue of its stock control of the English 
company, will still control the English company, and through 
it the French and Italian concerns. The plants in France 
and Italy will continue to be run separately. 

E. P. Roberts, who, since 1912, has been Commissioner 
of Smoke Abatement at Cleveland, has reopened his office 
as consulting engineer at Cleveland with temporary head- 
quarters at 2053 East Ninety-sixth Street. Mr. Roberts has 
had an extended experience as consulting engineer for 
public service and industrial properties. In the circular 
which accompanies the announcement in regard to the 
opening of his office, it is stated that the total amount 
involved in properties for which Mr. Roberts has been 
engineer, or for which he has prepared reports, is approxi- 
mately $175,000,000; the properties for which he has been 
engineer cost from a few thousand dollars up to $3,500,- 
000, and the properties existing or proposed which he 
investigated or reported on would cost from a few thousand 
dollars up to $8,500,000. 

ADVERTISING LITERATURE 

Eclipse Railway Supply Company, Cleveland, Ohio, lias 

issued a folder describing its trolley retriever. 

Ohmer Fare Register Company, Dayton, Ohio, has issued 
a card which reproduces an editorial which appeared in the 
Dayton Daily Newx of Dec. 23, 1914, commenting upon the 
proper relationship between manager and conductor. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



43 



Traffic Direction Block System 
of automatic signaling for Electric Railways 




Scranton & Binghamton Railroad 

This system is especially designed for the 
operation of interurban railroads. It com- 
bines the maximum of safety and efficiency 
with the least amount of apparatus. 



Wbt Mnion ^tuitcji Sc ^tpial Co. 



Trade 
Mark 



SWISSVALE, PA. 



Hudson Terminal Bide. 
NEW YOHK 
Canadian Express RldK. Candler Aanex 
MONTREAL ATLANTA 



Peoples Gas Bids. 
CHICAGO 
Railway Exchanse Bids. Pacific Bldsr. 

ST. LOUIS MO. SAN FRANCISCO 



Represented by the GENERAL ELECTRIC CO. in Australasia, South Africa and Argentina 



Trade 

B9 

Mark 



44 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



g aixK^er© 0^ ^ivgiiveer^" 






Electric Railway Lighting and 
Power Company Bonds 

ENTIRE ISSUES PURCHASED 

N. W. HALSEY & CO. 

New York Boston Philadelphia Chicago San Francisco 



THE J'G WHITE COMPANIES 



FINANCIERS 
MANAGERS 

43 Exchange Place 
Chicago 




ENGINEERS 
OPERATORS 

NEW YORK 

San Francisco 



The A rnold Company 

ENGINEERS- CONSTRUCTORS 

ELECTRICAL— CIVIL- MECHANICAL 

IDS SOUTH LA SALLE STREET 

CHICAGO 



A 

Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation 



Constructing Engineers 



NEW YORK 



BOSTON 



CHICAGO 



'% 
#'', 



ALBERT S. RICHEY 

ELECTRIC RAILWAY ENGINEER 

■WORCESTER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE 

WORCESTER, MASSACHUSETTS 

The Ej^^uiomical Production. Distribution and Application of Povrer; 

Transportation Efficiency; Physical Reports; Electrolysis Investigations; 

Estimates; Designs; Specifications; Tests 



ALBERT B. HERRICK 

Engineer to Electric Railway Propertlet 

for Greater EflBciency In 

Transmission Power Production and 

Equipment MaintenaDce 

Electrolysis Surveys and Remedial Measures Applied 

Sole Owner of Autographic Patents for Railway Testinft 

Office and Laboratory. 245 West 22d Street. New York City 



% i^* Bvllejsib^ & Co», 3Incotporatcti 



NEW YORK, 

Trinity Bldg. 



CHICAGO, 
Continental & Com- 
mercial Bank Bldg. 



TACOMA, 
Washington 



Purchase, Finance, Construct and Operate Electric Light, 
Gas, Street Railway and Water Power Properties. 
iKxamination and reports. Utility Securities Bought and Sold, 



SANDERSON 8t PORTER 

Engineers ^ Contractors 

REPORTS • DESIGNS • CONSTRUCTION -MANAGEMENT 

HYDRO-ELECTRIC DEVELOPMENTS 

RAILWAY. LIGHTIEB POWER PROPERTIES 

New York San Francisco 



.D. C. & WM. B. JACKSON 

ENGINEERS 

CHICAGO BOSTON 

HARRIS TRUST BLDG. 248 BOYLSTON ST. 

Plans, Specifications, Supervision of Construction 
General Superintendence and Management 
.1 Examinations and Reports 

Financial Investigations and Rate Adjustment! 



£n0tnccr0. 

115 BROAD'WAY, 
New Orleans NEVT YORK Sanrranciaco 



WOODMANSEE &. DAVIDSON. 


Inc. 


ENGINEERS 




MILWAUKEE CHICAGO 




Wells Bldg. 1st National Bank Bldg. 11 



H E. GREI MS COR PORATION 

examiners OF PUBLIC UTILITIES 
AUDITS— SYSTEMS— APPRAISALS— EXAMINATIONS 

TWENTY-FIRST FLOOR. WOOLWORTH BUILDINO 
NEW YORK 



A. L. DRUM & COMPANY 

CONSULTING AND CONSTRUCTINC ENCINEKR* 

ELECTRICAL • CIVIL • MECHANICAL 

PHYSICAL AND FINAN CIAL REPORTS 

American Trust Building CHICAGO 



Robert W. Hunt Jiio. J. Cone Jas. C. Hallsled D. W. McNaugher 

ROBERTW. HUNT & CO., Engineers 

BUREAU OF INSPECTION TESTS A CONSULTATION 

Inspection and Test of all Electrical Equipment 

NEW YORK, 90 West St. ST. LOUIS, Syndicate Trust BI.Ik 
CHICAGO, 2200 Insurance Exchange. 
PITTSBURGH, Monongahela Bk. Bldg. 



GULICK-HENDERSON CO. 

Inspaotlon Railway Equipment * Matarlala 
PITTSBURGH CHICAGO NEW YORK 



ScoHeld Engineering Co. *^**2S?,?IUSpw2* pa*" 



POWER STATIONS 
HYDRAULIC DEVELOPMENTS 



PHILADELPHIA. PA. 

GAS WORKS 
ELECTRIC RAILWAYS 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



45 




ra ^ Jtsivaiiveei^^ 




American Bridge Company 

Hudson Terminal-30 Church Street; NEw\bRK 



^\Man ufa cturers oJ- Steel Structures of a II classes 
particularly BrIDGES and BuILDINGS 



/ 


•^ 


W^ 




H 


^ 




•"1 




l^X 




h 


ta^ 


A. «,^P>' 


4 


,„jjkm 



t^lC 



NEW YORK, N. Y., 
Pkiladelpbia, Pa., Peniitylvaiua Building 
Boston, Mao. . . John Hancock BIdg. 
Baltimore, Md. , Continental Trust BIdg. 
PITTSBURGH, PA. . . Frick Building 
Rocbestrr, N. Y. ... Powers Block 
Buffalo, N. Y. . Marine National Bank 
Cincinnati, Ohio . Union Trust Building 

Atlanta, Ga Candler Building 

Cleveland, Ohio . Rockefeller Building 
Detroit, Mich., Beecher Ave. & M.C. R. R. 



SALES OFFICES 
30 Church Street CHICAGO, ILL., 208 South U Salle St. 
St. Louis, Mo. , Third Nat 'I Bank BIdg. 
Denver, Colo,, First Nat'l Bank Building 
Salt Lake City, Utah, Walker Bank BIdg. 

Duluth, Minn Wolvin Building 

Minneapolis, Minn. , 7th Ave &2nd St . ,S. E. 



Pacific Coast Representative: 

U. S.Steel Products Co. Pacific Coast Dep't. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., Rialto Building 
Portland. Ore. .... Selling Building 
Seattle. Wash, ,4th Ave. So. Cor. Conn. St. 



Transmission Towers at Birmincliam, 
Alabama, Alabama Power Company. 



Export Representative: 
United States Steel Products Co., 30 Church St., N. Y. 



EDWARD P. BURCH 

Consulting Engineer 



APPRAISALS OF 



STEAM AND ELECTRIC RAILWAYS 



Plymouth Building 
Dime Bank Building 



Minneapolis, Minn. 
Detroit, Mich. 



Drummond's Detective Agency 

A quarter of a centitry in business. 

A L, DRUMMONO, Gen. Mgr., Ei-Clilef U, S. Secret Service 
Park Row and Ann St., New York 

Inside Work Strike Breaking 

Checking Investigating of Claims 



Frederick Sargent 
\Vm. S. Monroe 



A. D. Lundy 
_ James Lyman 

SARGENT (a LUNDY, Engineers 

Railway Exchange Biag. Chicago, 111. 



NEILER, RICH & CO., ■"<: 

Successors to 
PIERCE, RICHARDSON & NEILER, (Inc.) Englnaars 

Miinhatcan ituiidintt. CliiCAGO. ILL. 



The Coal & Iron National Bank 
of the City of New York 

Capital, Surplus & Profits $1,635,000 
Resources Nearly $10,000,000. 



Offers to dealers every facility of a New York 
Clearing House Bank. 



THE P. EDW. WISCH SERVICE 

Suite 1710 Detectives Suite 715 

Park Row BIdg., New York Board of Trade BIdg., Boston 



IT IS A PAYING INVESTMENT 

to cany an adverHsement in the ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 
every week in the year. 



M. H. HOVEY, Consulting Signal Engineer 

446 Washington BIdg. MADISON, WISC. 
Investigations, I'lans, Specifications, Estimates and Valuations. 



ROOSEVELT & THOA4PSON 

BKGINISBRS 

Report, InTeatlgate, Appraise. Manage Electric Ballwa7, 

Light and Power Properties. 

71 BroadTyay. Hctt Yorlt 



46 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



WESTERN 



CEDAR POLES 




DOUGLAS FIR 



CROSS ARMS 



THE LINDSLEY BROTHERS COMPANY 

"GOOD POLES QUICK" AVENARIUS CARBOLINEUM TREATED POLES SPOKANE, WASHINGTON 



U. S. Metal & Mfg. Go. 

165 BROADWAY, NEW YORK CITY 
Chicago Atlanta 

RAILWAY SUPPLIES 



Selling Agents for Dunham Hopper Door Device — Feas- 
ible Drop Brake Staff — Columbia Lock Nut — Kling" Bolts — 
Shop Cleaner — "Texoderm" — U. S. Metal Rail Filing Ma- 
chine. Sole Eastern Agents for St. Louis Surfacer & Paint 
Co. General Eastern Agents for Hutctiins Car Rooting Co.— 
Multiple Unit Puttyless Skylight — Car and Locomotive Jacks 
— Electric Arc Welders. Special Agents for The Tool Steel 
Gear & Pinion Co. Special Agents for C & C Electric & Mfg. 
Co. General Agents for Anglo-American Varnish Co. 



Michigan 

CEDAR 

POSTS, TIES 



Western 

POLES 
AND PILING 



We use C-A-Wood-Preserver in Treating 

The Valentine-Clark Co. 

Minneapolis, Minn. St. Maries, Idaho 




Liquid 



Creosote Oil 



Will Cut Your Wood 

Preserving Bills 

in Half 

Write for Booklet 

Barrett Mfg. Co. 

NEW YORK 

Branches in Principal Cities 



TREATED 



POLES, CROSS ARMS, TIES, 
TIMBERS, PAVING BLOCKS. 

CAPACITY 100,000,000 FEET B. M. PER ANNUM 
SEND FOR PAMPHLET 

INTERNATIONAL CREOSOTING & CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Address all cornmunications to Office, Galveston, Texas 
Works: Beaumont, Texas Texarkana, Texas 



FIRE INSURANCE 

Special Altentioo Given to Traction Insurance 

Insurance Exchange, CHICAGO 



MARSH & MCLENNAN 



19 Cedar St. 
NEW YORK 



1615 California St. 
DENVER 



314 Superior St. 
DULUTH 



300 Nicollet Ave. Ford Bldg. 17 St. John St. 23 Leadenhall 
MINNEAPOLIS DETROIT MONTREAL LONDON 



THESE OFFICES WILL GIVE YOU THE BEST THERE IS IN INSURANCE SERVICE 



POLES 



NORTHERN WHITE CEDAR 



WESTERN RED CEDAR 



BUTT TREATING 



PACE & HILL CO. 

MINNEAPOLIS, MINN. 



LETTENEY IS LASTING 



1867 

A Carbolineum of 
Highest Quality. 



WDODim 1915 



LETTENEY 



PRESERVATIVE 

THE NORTHEASTERN CO., 



Carloads or less 
Shipped promptly. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



IN A WORD 
THE RAPID READY CHANGE CARRIER 

enahles cotuluctors to give change 
quickly. Passengers can pass into 
car immediately — Prevents crowded 
platforms — Shortens time at car 
stops. Just what you need. Price, 
$1.75. 

CHAS. F. ETTER 
904 N. 2nd St., Harrisburg, Pa. 




T* T> *** carry an advertisement 

11 rays in the ELECTRIC RAIL- 
WAY JOURNAL every issue of the 
year because you obtain u |. 

proportionately better rvCSUllS 




AETNA INSULATION LINE MATERIAL 

Third Kail Insulators. Trolley Buses. Poles. Hariis aud Wheels, 
Hron/.e and Malleable Iron Frogs. Crossings, Section Insulators. 
Seetion_ Switches. 

Albert & J. M Anderson Mfg. Co. ^ 

■ 288-83 A Street Boston. Mass. _ /^\— 
Established 1877. /s^^ 
HUANCIIES: rf l ^SLT l ^ 
New York. 135 B'wav Philadelphia, 429 Real Estate Trust IlMg. 
Chicago. lO.'i So. Ilearborn SI. London. 48 Milton Sli t 




February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



47 



ALUMINUM 

Railway Feeders 

kind.°o'f Electrical Conductors 

Aluminum feeders are less than one-half the 
weight of copper feeders and are of equal con- 
ductivity and strength. If insulated wire or 
cable is required, high-grade insulation is guar- 
anteed. Write for prices and full information. 



Aluminum Company of America 

PITTSBURGH, PA. 



liOEBLINGt 



Trolley Wire 

Wire Rope Wire Strand 



John A. Roebllng's Sons Company 

TRENTON, N. J. 







ll 






BRACH 






AUTOMATIC 






FLAGMAN 






indicates dan- 






ger by effecting 






a swinging red 






light, as a vis- 
ible signal, and 
a (locomotive) 




^^^^^^^^ t i'^ 


bell, as the au- 






dible warning. 
Built on most 
advanced engi- 
neering lines. 
They are now 
being used 
everywhere. 




■-.~2^ — "^ 


Mostly repeat 




Z.--^"^ 


orders. 

What's more, 
the cost is less 
than you think. 






L. S. BRACH SUPPLY CO. || 


Mfr. of Railway Signal Material and Electrical Specialties 


Main Office: 143 Liberty Street, New York 




PATENT APPLIED FOR 



White's Type 'T'' 
Porcelain Trolley Hanger 

Better Insulation. 
More Economical. 
Easily Adjusted. 

The T. C. White Company 

Electric Railway Supplies 

1122 Pine St., St. Louis 



An Assurance of Uninterrupted Service 

is best secured by a careful selection of the transmission line insula- 
tors. It is here that breakdowns are most likely to occur. 

Hemingray Insulators 

by reason of their continued use on important transmission lines 
have demonstrated the soundness of Hemingray design. The teats 
on the petticoat attract water on the outer and inner surfaces into 
drops — preventing the creeping of moisture on insulators and pins. 
The line is complete and the catalog shows it. Have you a copy? 

Hemingray Glass Company 

Established 1848 )_. ^ ^ 
f Covington^ Ky. 




No. 72—10000 Volts 



Incorporated 1870 
Factorias 



MUNCIE. INDIANA 




No. 20 — 5000 Volt* 



48 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



Many Electric Railway 
Power Plants 




Clamp Insulator 
Support 



are now equipped 
with "Three E" 
appliances. If you 
are not already 
familiar with our 
products it will 
pay you to become 
acquainted with 
this 




Third Rail Cable 
End Bell 




Labor Saving 

and 

Trouble Eliminating 

line of Devices. 

Our Bulletins describe them fully. Write 
today for 

Bulletin No. loi— Station and Pole Top 
Disconnects. 

" No. 102 — Cable End Bells. 

" No. 103 — Bus Supports. 

" No. 104 — Switchboard and Pipe 

Fittings, Clamps, 
Racks, etc. 

Electrical Engineers 
Equipment Co. 
, 711-715 Meridian St., Chicago 

James C. Barr, Boston, Mass. ; Lewis & Roth Co., 
Philadelphia. Pa.; The Hawliins-Hamilton Co.. 
Inc. Lynchburg. Va. ; Verne W, Shear & Co.. 
Akron, O. : R. B. Clapp. Los Angeles. Cal. 

Sortharn Electr/c Company 

LIMITED 
Distributors for Canada. 



The Best Engineering 
Practice 

in the installation of lead- 
covered cables of all kinds 
requires that the same care be 
given to protecting the insula- 
txn against moisture, etc., at 
the ends as at the joints in the 
manholes. 

STANDARD 

D. O. A. and D. S. 

Cable Terminals 



provide this protection and their many exclusive and 
patented features have been suggested by our over 
,30 years' experience in the manufacture and instal- 
lation of lead-covered cables of all kinds. 

Bulletins Nos. 700 and 710 give valuable engineer- 
ing data about terminal construction and installation. 

Write our nearest office for copies. 

Standard Underground Cable Co. 




New York 
Boston 



Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Philadelphia 
San Francisco 



Chicago 
St. Louis 



For Canada : Standard Underground Cable 
Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton, Ont. 

We manufacture Electric Wires and Cables of 
iill kinds, all sizes, for all services, also Cable 
accessories of all kinds. 






SHAW 

Overhead and Third Rail 
Insulation 

FREE FROM Contraction, Expansion, Moisture, 
Absorption, Surface Leakage, Varied Dielectric 
Strength, Mechanical Imperfection, Unnecessary 
Parts. Will stand 225° F. without softening and 
Impervious to Acids. 

Caps and Cones — Round Top Hangers — Globe 
Strains — Suspension Bolts — Feed Wire Insulators 
— Arc Lamp Hangers — Third Rail Insulators. 



SHAW LIGHTNING ARRESTERS 
Standard for 20 Years 



Newark Engineering Mfg. Company 

221-225 Murray St., Newark, N. J., U. S. A. 

GEO. E. AUSTIN CO., Sales Managers 
253 Broadway, New York City 



n — m 1 rn ' n — n 




I 



The Narrow 
Right-of-Way 

has its efficiency fully 
developed by using a 
pole like this- 60 feet, 
Laced Channel, on 
the East St. Louis 8b 
Suburban Ry. Co. 
line -400 foot spans! 

1>estgn and Manufacture 
of Wire Supporting 
Structures Exclusi'bely 




ARCHBOLD^BRADY" 
COMPANY 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. 




February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



49 



Twin Terminal Rail Bonds 

The ideal bond for intenirban railroads. Can be 
attached to the outer surface of any rail head by 
four studs expanded into drilled holes. Secure 
against moisture, torsional stresses and vertical 
movements of joints — affording a larger contact area 
than any other type of terminal. 

The cost of installation is very low when it is 
considered that the Twin Terminal offers all the 
advantages of double bonding. 

We manufacture four forms of Twin Terminal 
Bonds, made to meet all possible conditions. 

The Conductor loops are made from fine copper 
wires, stranded together, making an extremely flex- 
ible and durable bond. The terminals are accurately 
forged from solid copper by our special process, with 
cylindrical studs having blunt, conical ends. The 
outer face of terminals is provided with bosses for 
expanding into rail. 

To meet the requirements of the Twin Terminal 
bonding, our four-spindle drills, operated by hand 
lever or motor power, provide accurate and ready 
means of drilling one-half inch holes in the rails. 
Easily handled and operated, fitted with positive 
automatic feeding device and clamping solid to rails, 
the work is done quickly and accurately. 

Catalog with full description of our Rail Bonds and 
."Npp'iances upon application at any of our offices. 

American Steel & Wire Company 

Cbloago, New York. Worcester, Cleveland, Pittsburgh. Denver. 
Export Representative: D. S. Steel Products Company, 30 
Church Street, New Yorlt. Pacific Coast Representative: U. 
S. Steel Products Company. San Francisco, los Angeles. Port- 
land. Seattle. 



If It's LIGHT Gauge, 
Riveted Culverts You Want 




"IMPERIAL" 

Corrugated Metal 

Culverts will fill the bill 



In addition to our standard "ACME" (Nestable) Cor- 
rugated Culverts, vfe make this common style of cul- 
vert, here illustrated, both in STEEL and of the same 
Anti-Corrosive NO-CO-RO Metal used in "ACME" 
(Nestable) Culverts. For those desiring this riveted 
type, either light or heavy gauge, in preference to 
"ACME" (Nestable) Culverts (made only in standard 
or heavier gauge), this is an excellent product, backed 
by our reputation for dependable goods. Printed 
matter promptly furnished. Catalog G-3. 



The Q^TQN QjLVERTSSiioGK 

Man C FACTU RBRS 

(^NT on.Ohio, U.S.A. 



Quality Manganese Special Work Frogs and Switches 




Ottr Facilities permit handling 

large and difficult orders 

in quick time. 



New York Switch & Crossing Co. 

Office and Works 
Hoboken, New Jersey 



TOOLS 



for all classes of electrical construction and repair 
work. Write for catalog. 

Mathias Klein & Sons cnn^s^,^"" Chicago 





" 


Street Railway Signal 






Co., Inc. 




' 


PHILADELPHIA, PA. 


f^ i 


The first signal having official 
A. E. R. A. aspects. 



Metal Grounds Corrode 
HYDROGROUNDS 

Cannot Corrode 

They absorb moisture and in- 
sure a perfect earth connection 

Orders Filled Promptly. 

The W* R. Garton Company, Chicago 




FEDERAL SIGNAL CO. 



[■ either < 



AC. 

or 
D.C. 



Manufacturers "| ( Automatic 

Engi ncers > for -^ Signalling 

Contractors j ', Interlocking 

No Interlocking Switches Are Safe Without 
Federal Switch Guards 

MAIN OFFICE and WORKS - - ALBANY, N. Y. 

103 Park Avenue, New York Monadnock Block, Chicago 

118-130 New Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 



50 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



A Great Combination 




No. I to sweep cross- 
ings 

2 to handle light 
dirt and snow 
in the frogs, 
switches, and 
curves. 

3 to remove ice, 
slush and mud 
from the same 
places and a 

chisel point on 
the end of the 
handle to 
loosen the ice 
and crust. 

No. I and No. 3 con- 
tain Flat Steel Tem- 
pered Wire, and noth- 
ing superior can be 
produced. Service- 
able all the year 
round. Your road is 
not complete without 
them. Write for 
Prices. 



J. W. PAXSQN CO., Mfrs. 

1021 N. Delaware Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 



HIGHEST QUALITY 

TRACK SPECIAL WORK 




WE MAKE THIS GRADE ONLY 

CLEVELAND FROG & CROSSING CO 
CLEVELAND, OHIO 




The "Superior Rail Joint" combines all the best features 
of suspended and supported Joints. Made of Rolled 
Cast Steel or Malleable Iron. 



IVfanganese Steel Track Work 



FROM THi: 
LARGEST LAYOUT 
TO THE 
SMALLEST INSERT 

(1) 

1560 Kienlen, St. Lonis, Mo. 

Co. Mfg. Co., St. Louis. 




SI. Louis Steel Foundry, 

Owned ;iiid operated by Curtis ■ 




Ramapo Iron Works 

Main Office, Hillburn, N. Y. 
New York Office: 30 Church St. 

Automatic Switch Stands, 
T-Rail Special Work, 
Manganese Construction, 
Crossings, Switches, Etc. 



SPECIAL TRACK WORK 
For ELECTRIC RAILWAYS 

THE AMERICAN f^^^f^cH^ CO. 

HAMILTON, OHIO 



Kilby Frog & Switch Co. 

BIRMINGHAM. ALA. 
Tongue Switches, Mates, Frogs, Curves and 
Special Work of all kinds for Street Railways. 



GEO. F». NICHOLS & BRO. 

OLD COLOXY BUILDING CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 

DESIGNERS AND BUILDERS OF 

Ellecfric Transfer Xables 

Our trniT^fcr tables arn nsod on nonrly ovpry important steam 
rnilroad sy.-^tfin in tills country and on many electric railways. We 
can fiirtiisli tiu-iu in eitiier tlie surface or the pit types, and to meet 
all requirements. 



FROGS, SWITCHES, CROSSINGS 
SWITCH-STANDS, RAIL BRACES 

The Cincinnati Frog and Switch Company 

Cincinnati, Ohi j 



G. C. REITER, CANTON, O. 

Manufacturer of 

Car Gongs of all kinds 

Rotary and Single Tap Gongs 



ESTABLISHED 18«2 

The Weir Frog Company 

Manganese Track Work 

Cincinnati, O. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



51 




I-T-E 

Circuit Breakers 

Best in 

Design, Construction, Material 

For 

Heavy Railway Service 

Write for Hand Book of the I-T-E Circuit Breaker 
which contains Circuit Breaker data for every Service 

The Cutter Company 

Philadelphia ' 



8507 



Scale and Economy Cannot 
Exist in the Same Boiler Plant 

Enter Scale — Exit Economy 

And that is true whether your plant is small 
or large, whether you have the most expen- 
sive boiler equipment in the world or the 
least expensive. 

As soon as scale forms on the heating 
surfaces efficiency decreases and coal bills 
increase. 

In fact, you can get as much work out 
of a small boiler that is clean as you can 
out of a large boiler with scale-filled tubes. 

Economy means continually clean boil- 
ers — and this can be accomplished only by 
continuous treatment of the water with 
proper reagents. 

This is the Dearborn Method. 

Dearborn Treatment is made to handle 
conditions shown by analysis of the water. 
Gallon sample required. 

Dearborn Chemical Company 

McCormick Building, Chicago 



The Babcock & Wilcox Company 

85 Liberty Street, New York 

WATER TUBE STEAM BOILERS 



Steam Superheaters 



Mechanical Stokers 



Works: BARBERTON, OHIO— BAYONNE, N. J. 



ATLANTA, Candler Building 
BOSTON. 35 Federal St. 
CHICAGO, Marquette Building 
CINCINNATI, Traction Building 
CLEVELAND, New England Building 



BRANCH OFFICES: 

DENVER, 435 Seventeenth St. 
HAVANA, CUBA, 116}4 Calle de la Habana 
LOS ANGELES, American Bank Building 
NEW ORLEANS, Shubert Arcade 
PHILADELPHIA, North American Building 



PITTSBURGH, Farmers' Deposit Bank Building 
PORTLAND, ORE., Wells-Fargo Building 
SALT LAKE CITY, 313 Atlas Block 
SAN FRANCISCO, 99 First Street 
SEATTLE, Mutual Life Building 



FOSTER SUPERHEATERS 



Greatly Incraati 

Efficiency and Power ol 

Steam Turbines. 

POWER SPECIALTY GO. 

Trinity Building, 111 Broadway 
NEW YORK 



Service and Durability — The Test of Economy 

AMERICAN VULCANIZED FIBRE 

will meet both requirements of this test if you will use it for 
Track Insulation. 

Write for our Bulletin "For Safeguarding Safety Signal Appli- 
ances." 

Send us blue prints of your fibre parts and let us quote you 
prices. 

AMERICAN VULCANIZED FIBRE CO., WILMINGTON, DEL. 



IMMEDIATE DELIVERY ON 

Fibre Track Insulation 

Order from our Chicago or Elsmere factory, whichever is nearer, 
and delivery will be made without delay. 

Include an order for Disfico Horn Insulation for repair work. 




Elsmere, Del. 



DIAMOND STATE FIBRE CO. 



Chicago, III. 



52 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



SPECIALTIES FOR 

POWER HOUSE 
LUBRICATION 



TURROIL 



TRADE MARK 



FOR 
TURBINE LUBRICATION 




W, 



GAS 
CYLINDER OIL 

TRADE MARK 

For High-Duty Gas Engines Using Natural, 
Producer or Furnace Gas. Get the Original 
and Successful Brand. Never Failed. 

BORNE, SCRYMSER COMPANY 

80 SOUTH STREET, NEW YORK 



If you don't know which Webbing 
—ask US 

Tell us your service requirements 
and we'll make you the tapes and 
Webbings you need. Hope Tapes and 
Webbings are making good in Elec- 
tric Railway service from Maine to 
California. Write for Sample Book. 

HOPE WEBBING CO. 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

396 Broadway New York 

Consumers' Rubber Co., 

829 Superior Ave. N. W., Cleveland 

Belden Mfg. Co. 

23d St. and Western Ave., Chicago 

T. C. White Co.. 

1124 Pine St., St. Louis 




71892 




Tapes and Webbings 

are Standard Materials 
produced under Specifi- 
cations oi Railway Motor 
Manufacturers. 

These specificationB 
cover permissible varla - 
tions in width and thick- 
ness, state requlreil 
breaking strength, specify 
particular yarns, requis- 
ite warp ends, picks pef 
inch filling to produce r«- 
quired strength and thick- 
ness. Extensively used 
by manufacturers of mo- 
tors because m.iterial anH 
price are right 

Representatives t Chicago — Mr. B. P. Bartlett, 1368-70 Grand 
Ave. St. Louis — W. D. Wooley. 103 North 11th St., Brown & Hall, 
620 Central National Bank Bldg. Cleveland, Ohio — R. S. Mueller, 
42.T Illsh Ave.. S. E. 



Anchor Webbing Co. 

Mill & Office, Wooosocket, R. I. 






S. 



SAFETY FIRST-ECONOMY NEXT 

Non-renewable fuses are an expense. A good, renewable fuse is an investment. 
The only good Renewable Fuse on the market is marked "Economy" 

Write for Catalog No. 2 and Bulletin 

ECONOMY FUSE & MFG. COMPANY, KINZIE AND ORLEANS STS., CHICAGO 



ANY TYPE OF BOILER 

The Murphy Automatic Smokeless Furnace 

burns slack and other low cost fuels with unexcelled economy and 
with practically no smoke. Strictly automatic in feeding and dis- 
tribution of coal and the removal of the ash. Send for a complete 
description. 
113 UNITS OF ANY SIZE 

Murphy Iron Works, 10 Walker St., Detroit, Mich. 

BUFFALO PITTSBURGH CHICAGO 



A. G. E. LABOR SAVING MACHINES 

For Armature Banding, Coil Winding, Taping, Pinion Pulling, 
Commutator Slotting and Pit Jaclcs, Armatura Buggiaa and 
Armatur* Ramoving Machines. 

Manufactured hj 

AMERICAN GENERAL ENGINEERING CO. 

253 Broadway, New York, U. S. A. 



JEFFREY 

Coal and Ashes Handling Machinery 

can be adapted to all types and sizes of Power Plants 

Write for Illustrated Bulletin No. 32-B. 

Jeffrey Manufacturing Co., Columbus, O. 




The MODERN WAY of handling 

ASHES is by the PNEUMATIC 

SYSTEM 

Write and let us tell you all about it. 

GREEN ENGINEERING CO. 

Stagar Buildinc Chleaso, III. 

Catalogue 8 — GECO Pneumatic Ash Hand- 
ling: Systems. 
Catalogue "H" — Green Chain Grate Stokers. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



53 











\V^' 



^'V..A.^- 







When a Machine "Shorts' 

1st. "Cut Out" the Machine 
2d. Use 




FIRE EXTINGUISHER 



Pyrene instantly quenches fires among 
the most inflammable substances. Re- 
fractory, smoldering fires yield to 
Pyrene. Pyrene neither injures in- 
sulation nor copper and quenches arcs as well 
as fires. Can be played on bare, "live" conduc- 
tors carrying high voltage, without danger to 
operator. Write for data on Pyrene efficiency 
in electric railway service. 

Pyrene Manufacturing Co., 1358 Broadway, N.Y. 

Aberdeen, 8. D. Charleston, W. \ 
Alton Charlotte, N. 0. 

Anderson. 8. O. Chicago 
Atlanta Cincinnati 

Baltimore ClevelaDd 

Blrmlncham Dajton 

Brldseport Denyer 

Boston Detroit 

BufTaio Dututb 

Distributors to Electrical Trade: Western Electric Co. 

Pacific Coast Distributors: Gorliam Fire Apparatus Co. 
San Francisco 1-oa Angeles Seattle 

Canadian Distributors: IVIay-Oatway Fire Alarms, Ltd. 

Winnipeg Toronto 

Distributors for Great Britain and the Continent: 

The Pyrene Co., Ltd., 19-21 Great Queen St., London, W. C. 

716)6 



Fargo, N. D. 


Philadelphia 


JacicsonvlUe 


Pittsburgh 


Louisville 


Richmond 


Memnhls 


St. Loula 


Milwaukee 


St. Paul 


New Orleans 


Rait Lalie City 


Olilahoma City 


San Antonio 


Phoenix 


York. Neb. 




9107 



CAMERON 
COMMUTATORS 

Any user of Cameron Commutators 
will tell you that they give splendid serv- 
ice. That's why they have been adopted 
all over the country. 

Hard Drawn Copper Bars insulated 
with Canadian Amber Mica are pressed 
together hydraulically. There are no 
loose bars to cause arcing brushes. Write 
for our booklet. 

Cameron Electrical Mfg. Co. 

ANSONIA CONNECTICUT 



IRCO 



FRICTION rr/iprC 

are the Standard 1 rll EiiJ 

For Electric Railway and Lighting 'Jse 

Economy and Efficiency Combined 

IMPERIAL RUBBER CO., 253Bioadway, New York, U. S. A. 



" !«= 



Railroad and Tram Car Specialties 

New Inventions developed, perfected 
and worked for the English market 

Messrs. G. D. Peters & Co., Ltd. 

Moorgate Works, Moorfields, LONDON, E. C. 



SKYLIGHTS 

without packing or filling substance — Of GLASS and 
METAL ONLY — ABSOLUTELY and PERMANENTLY 
PROOF AGAINST LEAKAGE. Send for details. 
WE BUILD THEM RIGHT. 



National Ventilating Co., 



339 E. 26th St., N. Y. 



JACKS 



Barrett Track and Car Jacks 
Barrett Emet^ency Car Jacks 
Duff Bail Bearing Screw Jacks 
Duff Motor Armature Lifts 



The Duff Manufacturing Co., Pittsburgh, Pa. 



54 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



The Need of the Hour 
is Efficiency 

This is the cry of every industry. 
In yours it is attained by using 

Sherwin-Williams 
Paints and Varnislies 



used according to our new Modern 
Method Car Painting System. 
Send for our new booklet, "Effi- 
ciency the Need of the Hour." It 
will tell you how to attain it in your 
Paint Shop. 

THESHERWIN-WlLUAimS CO. 

RAtLWAY SALES DEPARTMENT 
801 CANAL ROAD, CLEVELAN D, OHIO ' 



Sterling Insulating Varnishes 
Sterling Iron Enamel Paints 

There is a Ster- 
ling product best 
for every insu- 
lating purpose. 

The Sterling Varnish Co. 

Pittsburgh, Pa. 




^^^S\ INSULATING 

TRADE MARK 

A black, quick-drying protective varnish made 
especially for electrical wiremen and contractors and 
telephone and electric light systems. It has high insu- 
lating properties and is not affected by the extremes 
of heat or cold. It also repels moisture and resists 
the action of alkalis, gases and acids. 

STANDARD VARNISH WORKS 

New York Chicago London 

International Varnish Co. Limited, 

Toronto, Canada 



Do You Figure the 6ost of Insulation by 
the Pound or by the Year? 

It's easy to buy insulation by the pound and buy it cheap, but to prac- 
tice economy you've got to check up what it cost you by the year, in 
replacement cost and in loss of revenue from idle cars, etc. 
The yearly cost of "Micanite" is lowrer than that of the cheapest in- 
sulation you can buy. Write for bulletins. 



M tANiTF 



AeCISTEit&O 



MieaNiTE 

Commutator Insulators, 
Tubes, Washers, Rings, 
Segments, Sheets, Tapes, 
etc., made of imported mica. 



New York 
68 ehurch St. 



EMPIRE 

Linseed oil treated Cam- 
bric, Linen, Silk, Canvas, 
Duck and Papers. High 
puncture voltage, long life. 



LINOTAPE 

Linseed oil, coated tape 
both straight and bias cut 
for coil winding, cable 
splicing, bus bars, etc. 



KABLAK 

Black varnished Cambric 
Linen, Silk, Canvas, Duck 
& Papers, Flexible, efficient 
under high temperature. 



Mie© 



Untreated insulating fab- 
rics. Papers, Fibres, Linen 
Tapes, Sleeves, Shellacs, 
Cements and Varnishes 



Miea INSULATOR e©. 



Chicago 
542 So. Dearborn St. 




KiNNEAR 

Steel and Wood 
Rolling Doors 

For Car Barns and Power Houses 



Write for new Catalog " M " and Booklet 
"Car Barn Doors." 



The Kinnear Mfg.Co.,Columbus,0 

Boston Philadelphia Chicag( 



^1 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



55 



Holds its Cutting Edge 




Woodman 

Quality 

Punch 



The tool-steel die gives the long service and sharp, 
clean work that you require. 

The R. Woodman Mfg. & Supply Co. 

63 Oliver Street, Boston, Mass. 

E. G. LONG CO., 50 Church St., New York City 
Eastern Electrical and Export Representatives. 



947 



Stowe Ticket Punches — 

Best malleable iron castings — 

Hard tempered plungers — 

Tool steel dies— Visible — 

Music wire springs — 

Highest polish — Utmost durability — 

Prices the lowest — Ask — 

Samples free — Repairs at Cost — 

Stowe Ry. Punch Co — Newark, N. J. 




This 




Represents Cost 
of Deltabeston 
over Cotton Insulated Wire 



Represents the 

Savings Deltabeston 

Effects in the Long Run 

Which Will YOU Take ? 

The above is simply a graphic illustration of 
the "penny wise, pound foolish" policy of let- 
ting price stand in the way of using "DEL- 
TABESTON" MAGNET WIRE on your 
coils. "Deltabeston" — the wire with the tough, 
permanently flexible, pure asbestos insulation 
— saves coil failures — motor burnouts — stalled 
cars — rewinding expense. Because "Delta- 
beston" stands up where ordinary insulation 
breaks down. That's all. Proof, if you ask 
for it. 



D & W FUSE CO. 

Providence, R. I. 



u 



1912 



AMER. RY. SUPPLY CO.* 



AMERICAN RAILWAY SUPPLY CO., 134-136 Charles St., NEW YORK 




Get Our 
Price Lists on 

BADGES and 



"For your new cars and old ones, buy The 
Peter Smith Forced Ventilating Hot Air Heaters, 
or Hot Water System, from the Originators, who 
can furnish an acceptable guarantee." 

THE PETER SMITH HEATER COMPANY 

1759 Mt. Elliott Ave. Detroit, Mich. 



THE RAiimYSuPPLY&CuRTAIN Co. If 



CHICAGO 

CAR CURTAINS & FIXTURES 
FOR ALL PURPOSES 

CATALOGUE ON REQUEST 




Ventilation— Sanilaiion— Economy— Safely 



All Combined in 



THE COOPER FORGED VENTILATION HOT AIR HEATER 

Patented September 30, 1913. Ask for the full story. 

We Also Manufacture Pressed Steel Hot Water Heaters 
THE COOPER HEATER CO., CARLISLE, PA. 



'UTILITY" Electric Thermometer Control 
. SAVES 70% In Heating Current 

UTILITY Ventilators Represent the Highest 

Efficiency-^Various types to Meet 

All Conditions 

RAILWAY UTILITY CO. Chicago and New York 



56 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



SAFETY FIRST 




Always ready for use. 
Takes both tickets and cash fares. 

CLEVELAND FARE BOX CO. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO 



The 

International 
Fare Box 




ASSURES 

Full and 
Complete 

Fare 
Collection. 
Accurate 
Registra- 
tion. 
Increased 
Earnings. 



This 

Box 

Is 



Well Built— Fool Proof— Tamper Proof. Working Parts 
Are of Hardened Steel to Insure Long Service at Minimum 
Upkeep Expense. Registers nickels, pennies and dimes. 

Write for detailed information 

INTERNATIONAL REGISTER CO. 

IS South Throop Street CHICAGO, ILL. 



Hale & Kilburn 

Steel Interior Finish 



is the product of the 
largest works in the 
world devoted to all- 
steel car products. 
One of the most wide- 
ly used products is the 



H&K 

Walkover Seat 



used by prac- 
tically every 
leading railway 
because it saves 
in car weight, 
power and 
maintenance. 
Specify it. 



Hale& 

Kilburn 

Company 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Chicago 




"Watch Your Step" 

If it has 

Universal Safety Tread 

on it 

Proceed in Safety. 

If Not 

Be Careful 

Universal Safety Tread Co., Waltham, Mass. 



New York 



Philadelphia 



Chicago 




SIMPLEX 
Roller Bearing Trolley 



Base^ 



Safest— most economical. Tension INCRHASHS as pole 
goes Ul', decreases as i>ole comes DOWN. 
No more bent i>oles or knocked down wires. 
Full larticulars from 

THE TROLLEY SUPPLY CO. 

Canton, Ohio 



•z^^- 



MASON SAFETY TREADS— prevent illpplntr and thus ob- 
viate damage suits. 
KARBOI.ITH CAR FLOORING— for steel earn la aanltarT. 

fircpnMif and light In weight. 

STANWOOn STEPS— are non-sllppinn and seKcleanlnn. 

Above products are used on all leading Railroads. For details 

address _ 

AMERICAN MASON SAFETY TREAD CO. 
Main Offli-es: Branch Offlces : Boston. New York City. Gblca)ro, Phlla- 
Ixjwill, Mass. delphla. Kansas City. Clevpland. St. Lonls. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



57 




Eclipse and Acme 
Fenders Give Im- 
munity from Ac- 
cident Suits 



The function of any fender 

is to protect the human body 

from the first impact with car 

body. That the "Eclipse" does this successfully 

up to speeds of thirty miles per hour is being 

demonstrated daily throughout the country. 

The Eclipse Trolley Retriever 

is designed for any range of service. Retrieves 
in less than three inches. Compulsory set; weak 
spring controlled by thumb nut on face of casing. 
No tools required for winding or adjusting. 
Fool proof. Furnished with open or closed rope 
drum. Use knotted rope or ferrule, as preferred. 
Less parts than any other retriever on market. 

Will send sample for trial. 

ECLIPSE 

RAILWAY SUPPLY CO. 
Cleveland, O. 




Why Not Buy Trolley 
Base and Retriever 
All in One 




That's 
What You 
Get In 



^e WASSON 

Jlir'RetrieVing 

Trolley "Base 

It performs the double function. It combines 
the ordinary trolley base with a retrieving mech- 
anism operated by air. It's the "last word," the 
latest development in the field. It means maxi- 
mum efficiency in car operation, as far as the 
trolley can contribute toward it. It means rapid 
transit without fear of jumping trolleys. It 
means freedom from damaged or torn down 
overhead if the trolley should leave the wire. 
Try it out. If it does not "make good" it costs 
you nothing. Order one today. 

The Wasson Engineering & SupplyJCo. 

Milwaukee, Wis. 



The Right Metal in the Right Place 

is a blj? factor in keeping cars In service. Car axles 

need a bearing metal specially designed for car 

axles — tbat'8 Post's "Zero" Metal. Motors 

need a bearing metal specially designed 

for motora — that's Post's "Motor" 

Metil. Both are standard with 

large companies. Post's Metals 

are guaranteed made of 

Virgin raw materials 

only. 




7352 



For Armature 

Bearings use 

Post's "Motor" 

Metal 



E. L. POST & COm Inc. 

Sole Manufacturers 

50 Cliff Street New York 



UNION SPRING & MFG. CO. 

SPRINGS 

Coil and Elliptic 

M. C. B. Pressed Steel Journal Box Lids 

General Office: Oliver Bldg., 

PITTSBURGH, PA. 
Works: New Kensington, Pa. 

EO Church St., New York. 1204 Fisher Bldg., Chicago, III. 
Missouri Trust Bldg., St. Louis, Mo. 




Nichols-Lintern 
Car Ventilators 

will change a car's atmosphere every 
ten minutes 

or in fact, from six to ten times per hour. They 
are neat and inconspicuous in appearance and 
maintain constantly a refreshing circulation of 
pure air at the same time obviating drafts. Im- 
prove heat distribution and prevent stuffiness. 
Write for details. 

The Nichols-Lintern Company 

Cleveland, Ohio 

REPRESENTED BT : 
William R. Garton. Sales Engr.. 299 Broadway. New York, N. T. 
Henderson-Lee Co.. 11-17 So. Desplaines St., Gtiicago, 111. Frank 
P. Bodler, 903 Monadnock Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. S. I. Walles, 
Los Angeles, Cal. Allen Gen'l Supplies, Ltd., 205 Yonge St., 

Toronto, Canada. 
729-P 



58 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



Stackpole Carbon Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Motor and Generator 

Brushes 





---^ 






v 1 






|3T,CKP0ltB 


-=fl^ 


^P 


■i 



Metallic and Graphite Brushes 
Carbon Specialties 



St. Marys, Pa. 




This is the 
man . who 
developed the 

ACME 
TRACTION 
MOTOR 
BRUSH 

It is a distinctly 
high grade pro- 
duct — uniform 
— eliminates 
wear — Longest 
life and worthy 
of your choice 
if you want the 
best. 



Ask us — 

THE NUNGESSER 
CARBON & BATTERY CO. 

Cleveland, Ohio 




to IT QICTRKAUV 




"Hard Service" 

Railway Motor Gears and Pinions 

have for years consistently represented 
SUPERIORITY, and appeal to the man 
who considers EFFICIENCY as well as first 
cost. Supplied in four grades : Standard, 
Special, Treated, Hardened. 

THE VAN DORN & DUTTON CO. 

Gear Specialists 
CLEVELAND (Sixth City) 

NEW YORK LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO 



Wheel Condition No. 3 



If only the 
wheel tread 
needs truing 
this type of 




Pat. May 31, 1898; Sept. 
1, 1903; Aug. 2, 1904; Dec. 
29, 1908; June IS, 1909; April 21, 1911 



r W^heel Truini( BraKe Shoe 

will solve the difficulty cheaper than any other method 
and without removing the car from service. 

Wheel Truing BraKe Shoe Co. ^r,'£?iL 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^-=^-=== 


— it's the economical 


// it' a >v 


brush ! 


Wgood brush! 


If you want a brush that w^ill 
give good credit to your choice 


v^\ vmmrn 


— get Speer's type G. 


\ \ ^^1 


It's a big advance in the brush 


\\. W^ 


making art. 


XXjj,^ ^^gjj^P^ 


Write for samples and data. 




Speer Carbon Co., St. Marys, Pa. 


1 3926 





February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



59 



A Prominent Ry. Tested 
"Tool Steel" Pinions 
vs. Case-Hardened 



S 



Here are the results. This 
is the "Tool Steel" pini- 
on after 170,760 miles, 
worn .086" at the pitch 
line. 



K 



7 



c 



'^ 



This is the case-hardened^^ ' "^ 

pinionafterl23, 351 miles; "^^ 

worn .165" at the pitch .^ — ^ 

line. ^ - ^ 

Efificiency 2% to 1 in favor of "Tool 
Steel." We talk records because we 
believe they mean more than salesman's 
promises. 

The Tool Steel Gear & Pinion Co. 

Cincinnati, Ohio 




There's a BLISS 

for every motor 
— for every service 



We furnish gears and pinions for 
every style- and size motor in 
service. 

We have a grade for every 
service condition, each and every 
grade carries its own guarantee. 



B/iss Gears and Pinions 



E. W. Bliss Co. 

Brooklyn, N. Y. 




Smoother, Safer, 
More Economical 
Car Operation 




results from use of 

The ANDERSON 

Automatic SlaCK. Jidjuster 

Increases in mileage of car per year 
and therefore earning capacity of each 
car by lengthening time between in- 
spections. 

Increases speed of operation by in- 
suring maximum efficiency and posi- 
tive working of brakes at all times 
under all conditions. 

Decreases labor costs by eliminating 
the man in the pit. 

Write for full description. 

Anderson Brake Adjuster Co. 

Omaha, Neb, 

William R. Garton, Sales Engr., 299 Broadway, N. Y. 
Grayson Railway Supply Co., Southwestern Rep., St. Louis, Mo. 





A Road May be Proud of 
Its Braking Efficiency 



Yet it may be wrong to conclude that the type 
they used should be on your cars. Your oper- 
ating conditions are probably different. What 
is profitable for one line may be unsuited to 
many others. The easiest way to make sure 
of getting maximum braking economy and 
efficiency for your road is to consult special- 
ists. That is our business. Consult us. 

American Brake Shoe & Foundry Co. 

MAHWAH, N. J. 
30 Church St., New York McCormick Bldg., Chicago 

71605 3 



60 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



Edison Non-Acid 

Storage Battery Lighting 




Night service is made popular by the 
Edison Battery System 

of non-dimming, even illumination 
which is offered to Street Railway 
Companies in a Practical Form. 
Edison Storage Battery Informa- 
tion regarding Car Lighting, Elec- 
tric Street and Baggage Trucks and 
Railway Car Power should be in 
the Data File of every Electric Railway Engineer. 

Write For It. 

Edison IStorage Battery Co. 

221 Lakeside Ave., Orange, N. J. 





E .G.Ixmg ComDang 

EDWARD H. MAYS, President 

Office!, SO Church Street New York 

PRINGS 
^<1^ASTINGS 
^TE=^ORGINGS 

Peckham Truck Parts 
Diamond Truck Parts 

Car and Truck Accessories 

ELECTRICAL REPRESENTATIVES 
Union Spring & Mfg. Co. 

Leaf and Coil Springi 
MCB Prattmd SUal Joarnal Box Covn 



There's No Hidden Weakness in 
"Jones-Built" Cars 

When you specify "Jones-Built" cars you've 
specified quality construction then and there. 
Specifications aid us in turning out the type 
of car you want, but the quality of work- 
manship that goes into it varies no whit in 
all the cars we build. 

They're Built on Honor 
Through and Through 

We build cars for electric railways only, 
but we build them well, and have been do- 
ing so since cars for surface railways were 
introduced. Some of our cars are still in 
daily operation after a quarter century of 
service. Write for data. 

J. M. Jones' Sons Company 

Builders of Can for Electric Railways Exclusively 

Established 1839 Incorporated 1911 

Watervliet, N. Y. 



The **1H^cap*=Bxibe • Battery 



for 



STORAGE BATTERY STREET CARS 



TheElectric Storage R«TERYCa 

PHILADELPHIA 



TU LC 



WE WANT YOUR BUSINESS 

IT DOES NOT MATTER 

How Large or How Small Your System is 
IT DOES NOT MATTER 

Whether Your Cars have Old or New Equipment 

TULC WILL SHOW A SAVING ON ANY TYPE 
OF EQUIPMENT IF GIVEN A TRIAL. 



THE UNIVERSAL LUBRICATING CO. 



Schofield Building 



CLEVELAND, O. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



61 



IT has been truly said that "the alloy which 
may be best for use in Trolley Wheel serv- 
ice may be far from being the best for 
bearing use" and this is why the 

KALAMAZOO 

Trolley Wheels 



,^»/«OFTHf;. 




are so satisfactory, the rims of which are made of a soft but tough metal 
having long life without injury to the wire, and the bushing of bearing 
metal, a combii ation impossible in a one-part wheel. 

MADE BY 

THE STAR BRASS WORKS 

Kalamazoo, Mich. 



Bayonet Non-Detachable Trolley Harp 

Something new, yet tried and true 



Made to meet the demands for an inexpensive 
trolley harp. For those who consider price before the 
time-saving as well as money-saving features of our 
well-known detachable harp. 



SMOOTH, SYMMETRICAL. LIGHT WEIGHT. 
NO PROJECTING CORNERS. Its efficiency is 
only surpassed by our Detachable Trolley Harp. 




Largest and heaviest contact washers made. Kept 
flat against faces of wheel hub by the best contact 
spring made with uniform tension. Springs most 
easily attached and they stay attached. Protected 
from all injury by outside influence. 



Any kind of bearing you want — 25 styles and sizes 
to select from, half-inch solid steel to one-inch hol- 
low steel, any way you desire. 

Write for discounts and our plain harp circular. 



Bayonet Trolley Harp Co., Springfield, Ohio 

Eastern Representative: 
Wm. R. Garton, Sales Engineer, 299 Broadway, New York City, N. Y. 



62 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 




This Index Prevents 

Destination Display 

Errors 

Many a passenger has been sub- 
jected to an irksome wait because 
the car he should have taken passed 
him with an incorrect destination 
display. Had a proper destination 
index been provided even the dull- 
est motorman or conductor could 
make no such annoying error. 
That's one strong reason why you 
need 

THE CREAGHEAD 

DAY AND NIGHT 
CAR SIGN 

But the index is not the only advan- 
tage of the Creaghead. The handy 
crank arrangement means quick 
change of display — no time is lost. 
And the Creaghead never sticks — 
always works easily and freely, yet 
keeps the display tight and taut at 
all times. Lettering is always kept 
clean and legible — it shines out 
clear and distinct night and day. An 
illegible sign is worse than none. 
To insure good sign service inquire 
about the Creaghead. Write now. 



Creaghead Engineering Co. 



Cincinnati, Ohio 




Quadruple 
Protection 



— four operating movements — 
every one positive in action — is 
the multiple safeguard that saves 
life and limb to the public and 
dollars and cents to the electric 
railway that adopts 



PARMENTER 
FENDERS 



Parmenter Fenders not only 
scoop up man, woman or child 
with automatic precision, but also 
provide perfect protection against 
the shock of collision and the 
dangerous rebound following. 

Write for details of the 1914 
model with the yielding and lock- 
ing apron. 



Parmenter Fender 
& Wheel Guard Co. 

89 State St., Boston, Mass. 



71573 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



63 



Five Economy Factors 

in the 

Universal Trolley Wheel 

WHEEL — never needs lubrication. Big grease pockets keep it 
permanently supplied. These last as long as the wheel contact 
metal, and that gives twice the service of ordinary wheels. 

PIN — with patented interlocking grease pockets that regulate the 
lubrication. A time and money saver in any wheel, but doubly 
efficient when combined with the Universal. 

BUSHING — improved hard bronze that presents a wide bearing 
surface and prolongs its life. Slotted to feed the lubricant. 

CONTACT METAL — composition proven by test the best to 
resist wear. Easily replaced when worn. 

CONTACT SPRING— maintains perfect contact. Detachable 
in seven seconds without removing the pole from the car. 

THE PRICE makes you wonder why you never investigated 
the Universal before. 

Write for the full data. 



The Universal Trolley Wheel Co., Northampton, Mass. 

Automatic Ventilator Co., Sales Agent, 2 Rector St., New York 





"Change those 

Brushes — 

put on Le Carbone" 



A command like 
that will do more to 

— cut shop costs 

— cut commutator 
costs 

— cut brush costs 

— improve service, 

than any other sin- 
gle thing that can be 
done. 

Do it now. 

W. J. Jeandron 

173 Fulton Street 

New York 



64 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 




Double Skin Compromise Arch Type. 



* * > 



Most modern types of cars are equipped with 

PERRY VENTILATORS 

Over fifty thousand in operation 

— They ventilate — 

Special designs for Arch or Compromise Arch Roofs, eliminating all 
ungainly projections by methods impossible to other devices. 

PERRY VENTILATOR CO. 

NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 

Sales Manager: F. C. Stowell, 200 Devonshire St., Boston, Mass. 

1 * ♦ ♦ 




What you get out of your 
Electric Railway Journal 

depends upon the time and thought you put into the reading of it. 



Thought, time, energy and money are ex- 
pended in abundance to mal:e each issue of 
maximum value to the greatest possible num- 
ber of readers. You benefit by this expendi- 
ture in direct proportion to the attention which 
you give to your paper. 

A mind alert for suggestions will find in 
every issue food for thought and help in its 
daily tasks. This applies to the reading of 
the advertising pages, as well as to the read- 
ing of the text. 

Remember that electric railway progress 
is due as much to the efforts of the engi- 
neers engaged in developing new equipment 



for manufacturers as to those who buy and 
use what these manufacturers tell about in 
their advertisements. 

These engineers who give their talents to 
the manufacturing branch of the industry are 
always ready to give the benefit of their study 
and experience to their fellows in the field. 
An inquiry addressed to the advertiser is 
usually all that is required. It will receive 
prompt attention whether or not you are in 
the class of potential buyer at the time. 

Advertisers know the advantage of giving 
full and reliable information to everybody in 
the field who indicates his interest in any- 
thing relating to the advertised product. 



Make the Most of It 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



65 



9- '-^^ 



J^H^ 



HIGH 
EFFICIENCY 



Portable Air Compressors 

,..^_^___ equipped with electric or gas motor drive. 
For electric power house, repair shop and construction work 

Built in capacities ranging from 11 to 300 cu. ft. of free air per minute. 

Twenty-Five Types To Select From 



dif- 

ly 



These outfits will be found most efficient and economical where the floor space 
limited or the nature of the work requires that a supply of air be delivered m ' 
ferent places and under constantly changing conditions because they can be easi 
moved from place to place. They eliminate the necessity of extensive piping 
National Portable Outfits with Gas Motor Drive are especially adapted 
for construction work or where electric power is not immediately available. 



Catalog E-400 illustrates and describes these outfits together 
with many other types of National Air Compressors. You 
ought to have a copy. Better write for one today. | 

National Brake & Electric Co. 

Works at Milwaukee, Wis. 



SALES OFFICES 

New York 165 Broadway 

Chicago.. 827 Railway Exchange 

St. Louis 318 Security Building 

Pittsburgh Ninth and Penn Avenue 

London, England 14 Great Smith Street 




Guaranteed 
Mileage 




With the ^^^ 4< 

uncertainties of ^^^ 

traffic conditions, 
rolling stock, loads and 
trackage it might be consid 
ered a risk to guarantee wheel 
mileage. 

Knowing the composition and actual re- 
sults in service of F. C. S. Wheels, however, we do 
not hesitate to give users an iron-clad guarantee of 
wheel mileage and to protect the user in each case against 
deficient mileage (should such occur) by either a cash allow- 
ance or wheel replacements. 

Aren't F. C. S. Wheels worth investigating if we will do this? 

For safety and economy specify the F. C. S. Wheel. 

Griffin Wheel Company 

PLANTS- Chic > go, Detroit, Danver, Lot Angelet, SI. Paul, Taeoma, Kansas City, Boston 



66 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 




Standard Trucks 

For Safe, Long-time Service 



Opposite is 
"SHORT 
TRUCK. 



shown our Standard O-50 
WHEEL BASE" DOUBLE 



STANOARDMOTORTRUCKCOMPANY,FrlekBldg.,PITTSBURGH,PENN. 

Pacific Coast Agents: Ecc'es & Smith Co.. Inc. Offices. San 



Frames solid forged without welds, 1. e.. 
made from one continuous bar of open- 
hearth steel. Carrying capacity 50,000 
pounds at king pins, 34" Forged Steel 
wheels, 3% x 7" M.C.B. journals. Brake 
shoes hung on the equalizer bars (thus 
insuring uniform wearing of brake shoes). 
All wearing holes steel-thimbled and bolts 
case-hardened. This truck is used 
throughout the New England cities. New 
York, Detroit, Toledo, Oklahoma City, 
Seattle, Jacksonville, Kansas City, San 
Francisco, Cincinnati, Indianapolis and 
many other cities. 



Our STANDARD C-60-P "INTERBOR- 
OUGH" DOUBLE TRUCK is ideal for 
high-speed "Interborough" service. Car- 
rying capacity 60,000 pounds at king pins. 
Pressed steel channel side frames, end 
frames and transoms. Brake shoes hung 
on the equalizer bars. All wearing holes 
steel-thimbled and bolts case-hardened, 
36" Forged Steel wheels, M.C.B. Journals 
414 X 8". These trucks are in service in 
the following cities: — Cincinnati, Detroit, 
Pittsburgh, Youngstown, Vancouver, Se- 
attle, Oklahoma City and other cities. 
Can be safely operated at a speed of 60 
to 70 miles per hour. 



We make Standard Trucks for all kinds 
of electric railway service. 

New York Office! 170 Broadway. Works i New 
Castle. Pa. ChieaKO Offlpe: FlNlier BiilialiiK 

Francisco, Cal. : Los Anjreles. Cal. ; Portland. Ore. 2 



"Taylor-Made" Trucks 

Simplicity of Construction — Low Cost of Maintenance — Ease of Riding 



'*•>" f'x^,' 



-;t- '2r^ "(^ '"■^, 




Taylor Improved S. B. Truck for City and Interurban Service 

To obtain the latest developments in truck design and construction, 
SPECIFY TAYLOR TRUCKS. They have interchangeable wearing 
parts and many other TAYLOR advantages which you should know. 

Write for Truck Photos and data. 



We also manufacture T.M.C. 
Steel Tired Wheels and 

"TAYLOR-MADE" 

Elliptic and Coil Springs for 
every make of truck. 



TAYLOR ELECTRIC TRUCK CO. 



Main Office and Works: 
TROY, N. Y. 



Established 1892 

TROY, N. Y. 



CHICAGO OFFICE: 
First National Bank Bldgi. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



67 



THE "STANDARD" BRAND ON YOUR MATERIAL IS AN 
ASSURANCE OF EVENTUAL ECONOMY 



ROLLED STEEL WHEELS 
FORCINGS 



TIRES 



AXLES 



SPRINGS 

GEAR BLANKS 



STEEL TIRED WHEELS 



ROLL SHELLS 




RINGS 



CASTINGS 



RING DIES 
PIPE FLANGES 



STANDARD STEEL WORKS CO, 



Portland, Ore. 
Denver, Colo. 
San Francisco, Cal. 
City of Mexico, Mex. 
St. Louis, Mo. 



MORRIS BUILDING 
PHILADELPHIA 



Chicago, in. 
New York, N. Y. 
Richmond, Va. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 




BALL BEARINGS 




Type of Bearing Used on 
Above Car — Deflected Position 




for 



Electrical equipment supplied by the Railway Storage Battery 
Car Co. Car body built by the J. G. Brill Co. 



Cambria & Indiana Railway 
Storage Battery Car 

S K F Ball Bearings again demonstrate their supe- 
riority by their selection for service on the new 
storage battery car operated by the Cambria & 
Indiana Railway. 

In no type of car is the question of bearings more 
vitally important than in storage battery car service. 
The efficiency of S K F Bearings contributes mate- 
rially to the high speed and exceptionally long, range 
per battery charge possible to the above car. Write 
for figures on S K F economy in the above and simi- 
lar services. 



SKF- BALL BEARING BO. 'N^w'?^fLX" 



7 108-P 



68 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



The basic idea in designing railway equipment should be 



SAFETY FIRST 




To insure this feature in 
Baldwin Trucks, a stress dia- 
gram is made, and the principal 
parts are figured for strength 
and deflection, allowing the 
proper factor of safety. The 
calculations are corroborated 
by years of practical experi- 
ence. 

A safety first feature of Bald- 
win trucks is the brake work. 

The parts are bolted instead of pinned together; a sure preventive of their working 

loose and falling on the track. 

BALDWIN TRUCKS stand for "SAFETY FIRST." 

THE BALDWIN LOCOMOTIVE WORKS 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

REPRESENTED BY 
Charles RIddell, 625 Railway Exchange, Chicago, III. George F. Jones, 407 Travelers Building, Richmond, Va. 

C. H. Peterson, 1610 Wright Building, St. Louis, Mo. A. Wm. HInger, 722 Spalding Buildina, Portland, Ore. 

F. W. Weston, 50 Church Street, New York, N. Y. Williams, Dimond & Co., 310 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

J. A. Hanna, Niies, Ohio 




New End-Entrance Car built for the 
Stark Electric Railroad 

The novel idea of placing the door-location at the end 
of the above car to facilitate prepayment renders this 
example of Jewett construction of special interest. Ler 
us furnish estimates on your specifications. 

The Jewett Car Company 



71698 



Newark, Ohio 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



69 



Your Own 
Electric Railway Journal 



THESE are the advantages of being a personal 
subscriber for the Journal: You receive your 
own copy of the paper each week. You have it 
to read when you want it and as long as you want 
it. You can keep your own file of the paper for reference. 
If you are not a regular subscriber, you probably see 
the Journal from time to time. But, are there not times 
— and many of them — when you want to read the latest 
issue and some one else has it? Are there not many other 
times when you want to refer to an article in a back num- 
ber but cannot find that number? 

For less than 6 cents a week you can be a personal 
subscriber — you can get all the news of the field while it is 
still fresh and valuable — you can have a constantly grow- 
ing library of your own on all branches of electric rail- 
roading. 

You will never miss the subscription price, but you will 
miss a lot of things if you do not get the Journal. 



Better send your order to-day 
before it is forgotten 




! Electric Railway Journal, 239 W. 39th St., New York, N. Y. 



70 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 





NE Vv •, I N Y. lWORK,S 



Westinghouse 


Lamp Company 


Atlanta 


Los Angeles 


Baltimore 


Memphis 


Boston 


New Orleans 


Buffalo 


New York 


Butte 


Philadelphia 


Chicago 


Pittsburgh 


Cincinnati 


Portland 


Cleveland 


St. Louis 


Dallas 


Salt Lake City 


Denver 


San Francisco 


Detroit 


Seattle 


Kansas City 


Syracuse 


Member Society for Electrical De- 


velopment. 


Do It Electrically." 



Westinghouse 
Mazda Lamps 
Are Made in 
Westinghouse 
Factories 



Three modern up-to-date 
completely equipped lamp 
factories — owned and oper- 
ated by the Westinghouse 
Lamp Company — manufac- 
ture the millions of Westing- 
house Mazda lamps used 
each year in the United 
States. 

The enormous output of 
these plants enables us to 
offer you the best of service 
on lamp deliveries. 

Our large experimental 
laboratories give us the abil- 
ity to set — not merely keep 
—the pace in the rapid devel- 
opments in lamp manufac- 
ture. 

When you sign a contract 
for Westinghouse Mazda 
lamps you get satisfactory 
lamps and satisfactory serv- 
ice. 

The name "Westinghouse" 
is your guarantee. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



71 



MARKET 




A Complete Sign 

You can get most any type of Keystone Car Destination Sign — types 
for installation in boxes built in as a permanent part of the car; types for 
installation in side monitor windows, above doors in center-entrance cars, 
side windows, vestibule windows, on the surface of the deck, hood signs, 
route signs, and signs to meet many more conditions, regular or special, 
signs to be illuminated or otherwise. The line of Keystone Car Destina- 
tion Signs is complete. 

The illustrations above show front and rear views of standard Type I 
signs, well adapted for installation in side vestibule windows; a glazed 
sign, installed in a weatherproof steel box, illuminated, and having the 
well-known Keystone advantages of one piece curtain, removable curtain 
and mechanism, positive gear, and clutch drive, centering and destination 
indicators and many more. 

This type and many others are yours for the solving of your sign prob- 
lems in the best, jiiost efificient and cheapest manner. 

Tell us the conditions you have to face and let us recommend the 
Keystone Destination Sign that will best fill them— all without obligation 
on your part. 

Elixtric Service^ SuppcrES Ca 

Manufacturer of Railway Material and Electrical Supplies 



PHILADELPHIA 
1 7th and Cambria Sts. 



NEW YORK 
Hudson Terminal 



CHICAGO 
417 So. Dearborn St. 



72 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Februaky 6, 1915 



It Picks Tkem Up 
Instead of 
Crusning Them. 
Under! 

FONGER Tip-Tilting 

Automatic Fender 

Observe the photos. 

No. I shows child, unconscious of danger, 
crossing track in front of car. 

No. 2 shows overturnable shield automatically 
tripped by contact with child's body and thereby 
instantly filling the space between fender and 
street surface, making it impossible for child to 
become wedged beneath fender. 

No. 3 shows shield completely tripped, "scoop- 
ing up" the child. 

No. 4 shows the child safely landed in basket 
of fender. 

One of the decided advantages of the Fonger 
Fender is the manner in which it prevents a 
person being caught under it. The tip-tilting or 
overturnable shield guards against this by auto- 
matically and instantly tipping back and drop- 
ping to street, thereby "scooping up"' the person 
struck. 

By depressing a plunger with his foot, motor- 
man may quickly swing fender back under car 
in order to avoid contact with wagons or other 
obstructions. 

In normal running position, fender projects 
but 2 feet ahead of car, as shown in photo No. i. 

Trial set of these fenders sent on request free 
of charge and fitted to any type of car. 

Fonger Fender Company 

3852 Cottage Grove Ave. CHICAGO, ILL. 





February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



73 




FABRIKOID 

for Seat Covering 
and Curtains 



on new cars of 



V DU PONT 1^ 



Altoona & Logan 
Valley Electric Ry. 



the tough, weather- rec.u.s.pat.off. the non-splitting, non- 
proof Curtain Material peeling, Seat Covering 

Fabrikoid is absolutely impervious to moisture ; it can be easily and 
perfectly cleaned with soap and water. Dirt does not cling to it 
as to woven surfaces. Fabrikoid is more sanitary. It is extremely 
durable, does not crack or peel, yet is very pliable and easily applied. 
It is economical — in first cost as well as maintenance. Use it for 
curtains and seating. Fabrikoid saves money and betters service. 
Made in many weights, widths, patterns and colors. Write for 
samples and prices. • 

DUPONT FABRIKOID COMPANY 

Dupont Building, Wilmington, Del. 

Railroad Dept. Representatives: 

WENDELL & MacDUFFIE COMPANY 
63 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



74 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



Chilled Iron 
Street Car Wheels 

The fact that 97 per cent of all 
our freight cars in this country are 
equipped with Chilled Iron Wheels 
is convincing proof of their supe- 
riority. 

The Chilled Iron Wheel is a single 
service wheel and in STREET CAR 
SERVICE is superior to other types 
because of the harmony of its struc- 
ture with the parts with which it 
comes in contact, such as brake shoe 
and rail. 

No cutting action in Chilled Iron 
Wheels on the rail or brake shoe 
which is common in other types; 
therefore the rail lasts longer, the 
brake shoes yield 25 to 50 per cent 
more service and there is 10 per cent 
less power required. 

The Wonderful Single Service Chilled Iron Car Wheel 

ASSOCIATION OF MANUFACTURERS OF CHILLED CAR WHEELS 

1214 McCormick Building, Chicago 

Representing forty-eight wheel foundries throughout the United States and Canada. 
Capacity 20,000 Chilled Iron Wheels per day. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



75 




''^\j\nr\j\N'^ 



Six Spoke 

Gears 



6 -SPOKE GEARS for railway motor 
service have greatly eliminated the 
inherent defects in cast steel gears. 

The spokes are elliptical in section, 
and so proportioned as to reduce shrink- 
age stresses to a minimum. 

These gears can be furnished either 
split or solid in any grade previously 
supplied in four-spoke gears. 



Address Dept. E 

Nuttall 
Pittsburgh 

Made in U. S. A. 



76 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



BEMIS TRUX 

Built in a NEW Plant 

The Product of Ncaa^ and Improved Facilities 
THE BEMIS STANDARD SINGLE TRUCK 




Easy 
Running 



Built 
Any Wheel Base 



Steel Yokes or Pedestals, Either Regular Bemis Standard 

Brakes, or Special Non-Chattering Adjustable Brakes. 
Also Standard Heads. All parts drilled and Machined in Jigs. 

All parts Interchangeable. 



The Best Brake Pins on the Market 



CASE 

HARDENED 
yii DEEP. 



BRAKE Piroe Bf C^Se Tl BUeHlNGS, 

ABSOLUTELY SMOOTH HH^'^'^^^f tj P] COLO DRAWN 

AND l-'I gUSHiNG^IJ STEEL TUBING 

TRUE TO DIAMETER. **■ ** OF ArjY SIZE. 

SPECIAL PINS aOl_TS OR STUDS MADE TO QRDEPl. 

Bemis Car Truck Co. 



<^_FORGEO_J 

lilANGANEStJ 



TOUCH 
ALL WAY 
THROUOK 



. e_ 



t 



Springfield.Mass. 



t 



40D1FFE RENT SIZES OF 

CASE HARDENED PiN3 

CARRIEDIN STOCK 



SEND FOfl OflDEH 
CU(DC C IS3. 



t^ 



TEST WITH HAMMER, SAW, FILE OR CHISEL. 

Compare with any other pins. 
We cannot suffer by comparison. 

BEMIS CAR TRUCK CO., SPRINGFIELD, MASS. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



77 




As practiced in large oil-electric battery self-pro- 
pelled cars for steam railroad branch lines and fast 
interurbans. 

Continuous steel center sills should be used in all 
cars subject to buffing and drawbar stresses of train 
service and for protection against telescoping in 
collisions. Center sills are omitted from Niles cars 
only when for single unit service exclusively. 

The diamond rolled steel floor is for engine and 
baggage rooms only. Steel and Flexolith floors will 
be used in passenger compartments. 



Continuous steel angle top plates are better than 
continuous posts and carlines as they provide better 
upper members for the girder sides. 

Roof will be entirely of steel with sheets fastened 
to carlines outside and inside with 3" air space be- 
tween. The channel flanges provide better body of 
steel for rivets than thin special pressings and have 
the webs punched out. 

Over -, tons of electric batteries are carried on 
special trusses under car, independent of body 
frame. 




There are absolutely no 
special pressings or forg- 
ings in this car. It can be 
repaired or replaced from 
warehouse stock by your 
own mechanics with or- 
dinary tools. 



NILES 

Car and Mfg. Co. 

NILES, OHIO 



78 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



SAFETY FIRST 



A Collision 
— The Result 



Running at full speed (60 miles an hour) Coach No. 25 ran smack into Traction Engine 
stalled on the tracks. What happened is most convincingly told in the accompanying 
illustrations. 




THE COACH. Not a Passenger Injured. Damage to Coach Infinitesimal. 



i 

1 
i 


\ 


* 

> 


W 

^>-:* 






i 






\ ■ • ^ 


L 




^JMB 




i 

^ 




^ 

k 


Jl 


-■ ^ 




BBBH5ir^^^^?^*^^^^^^^^wv .■*^'' 





THE ENGINE. 
Most gratifying to the Designer and to the Builder of the 61-ft. Steel Coach. 

SAFETY FIRST 

ST. LOUIS CAR COMPANY, St. Louis 

Electric and Steam Railway Coaches, Steel Cars, Trucks and Journal Bearings, 
Curtains, Seats, Rattan, Bronze Trimmings, Miscellaneous Car Supplies. 

Eastern Representative: Pacific Coast Representative: 

WENDELL & MacDUFFIE CO. GUS KOCH 

6i Broadway, NEW YORK 797 Monadnock Bldg., SAN FRANCISCO 



FEBRUARY 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



79 



CAR DATA AND DETAIL TABLE 
Advertisers' Statistical Section 



THIS section constitutes a collective 
advertising plan on new lines, par- 
ticipated in by the following manu- 
facturers who availed themselves of this 
opportunity to advertise their 1914 salies 
of cars and car equipment. 



NAME 


ABBREVIATION 
OR TRADE NAME 


Auto UtiUties Mfg. Co. 


Peerless 
r American 


Brill Co., The J. G. 


Brill 
Kuhlman 




. Wason 


Cincinnati Car Co. 


Cin. Car 


Consolidated Car Fender Co. 


f H-B 
1 Prov. 


Consolidated Car-Heating Co. 
Curtain Supply Co. 
Edwards Co., The O. M. 


Consol. 
Cur. S. Co. 
Edwards 


Esterline Co., The 


Esterline 


Johnson Fare Box Co. 
Lord Mfg. Co. 


Johnson 
f Lord 
1 Earll 


National Brake Co. 


N. B. Co. 


New Haven Trolley Supply Co. 
Ohio Brass Co. 


Sterling 
O-B Co. 


Ohmer Fare Register Co. 
Prepayment Car Sales Co. 
Railway Improvement Co. 
Railway Roller Bearing Co. 
Sauvage-Ward Brake Co. 
Southern Car Co. 


Ohmer 

P. C. S. Co 

Rico 

Rollway 

S-W-B 

Southern 


Thayer & Co., Inc. 


Chil'wth. 



The table on the succeeding pages is based 
on information furnished by the adver- 
tisers in this section. 



80 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



Table of Advertisers in this Section whose eq 



Purchaser 


No. 


General Type 


Motor or 
Trailer 


Length 
of Car 
Body 


City 
or 
Int. 


AU-eteel, 
Semi-steel 
or Wood 


Body 


Pre- Door 
pay- Op. 
ment Mech. 


Com- 1 

pressor llrnket 
Air Haw 
Cleaners 


Albany Southern R R 


2 
1 
1 

5 
4 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
100 
3 
! 
1 
2 

? 
1 
10 
1 
2 
1 
2 
2 
4 
3 
1 
6 
1 

8 
6 
2 

10 
2 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
3 

12 
7 
2 
.5 
1 
3 

10 

62 

66 
1 

12 
228 

20 

200 
2 

8 
1 

1? 
4 
1 
1 
1 

9 
1 

2 
1 
10 
10 
2 
2 
2 

15 
2 
4 
3 
5 
6 
4 
1 
i 
1 
4 
1 
9 
1 
1 
6 

14 
2 

28 
1 
t 
1 
1 

12 

12 

a 

3 
3 
1 
I 
12 


Ps.Clsd 

Express 

Car 


Motor... . 

Motor. ... 


30-6 


Int. . . 
Int... 


Semi-steel., 
Semi-steel.. 


Brill 






, 


N.BCo 




Wason .... 
























Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Clsd 

Snow Plow 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Conv 


Motor. . 
Motor... 

Motor... . 
Motor... 
Motor..,. 
Motor... . 
Motor... . 


28- 
32- 
30- 
70- 
30- 
30- 8 
21- 
21- 
30- 


City.. 
Int. . . 
Int... 
Int... 
City.. 
City.. 
City. , 
City, , 
City.. 


Semi-steel. - 
Semi-steel., 
Semi-steel.. 
All-steel. . . 


Brill PCSCo.. 

Brill . - 


PCSCo.. 




























1 




Wood 








1 




Semi-steel., 
Semi-steel.. 
Semi-steel.. 
Semi-steel.. 


Wason 








Bartiesvillelnt Ry 


Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Conv 

Snow Plow 












Kuhlman,. 








Bav State St Ry 






Lord... 












Ps.Conv 

El. Loco 

Pass 

2-Way Dump 

Snow Plow 

Snow Plow 

Sweeper 

Ps.Clsd 

Express 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Exp 




City.. 














Motor... 
Trail 


30-0 
















City.. 
City. . 
City.. 
City.. 
City. . 
City.. 
City.. 
City.. 
City.. 


Semi-steel.. 
Steel 


Brill 




Consol . . 






Motor... , 
Motor. - . 
Motor..- . 
Motor... . 
Motor.... 
Motor.... 
Motor... . 


24^i0} 
31- 61 
30- 
27- 
21- 
45- 
29-6 










Wood 

Wood 


Wason 




















Wood .. . 












SemiHitecl.. 
Wood ... 




















BridKeton&MillvilleTr.Co 


Semi-steel.. 


Brill 








Brit. Columbia Elec Ry 












Motor . 




Int 










1 


Bryan & Cent. Texas Int. R.R 

Brvan&ColIecelnt.Ry 

Buffalo & Depew Ry 

Buff.&WilliamsvilleEl.Rv 




52-4 
45- 


Int... 
Int.. 


Ali-steel,., 








1 ■ ■■ 


Ps.Clsd 

Snow Plow 


Motor... 


Semi-steel.. 










s 
\ 










Ps.CUd 

El. Loco 

El. Loco 

Gasoline Mech. Drive.. 
Ps.Clsd 


Motor... 
Motor... 
Motor... 

Motor.'.!. 


41-10 

80-Ton. . . 

40-Ton,.. 
6.5- 
41-10 


City.. 
Int... 


Semi-steel. 


Kuhlman. . 


PCSCo.. 


prisco 










Int 














Int.. 
City. . 
City.. 
Int.,., 
Sub... 
Sub. . . 


All-steel... 










Butte Elec. Ry 


All-steel... 












Steel 












St.Bat 

Ps.Clsd 

El. Loco 

St.Bat 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Clsd 


Motor... 
Motor... 
Motor... 
Motor.... 
Motor... 
Motor... 


44^ 4 
67- 7 
S.l-Ton . 
18- 
44-8 

47- 
41- 

48- 
32-0 


Semi-steel.. 
All-steel . . 


Brill 








Canadian Northern R. R. (Montreal Tunnel & Ter.) 




















Carolina Trac Co 


City.. 
City. . 
Int... 
Int.., 
Int . . . 
Int. . 


Semi-steel.. 
Semi-steel.. 
Semi-steel. 
Semi-steel.. 
Semi-steel.- 


Brill 








Cedar Rap. & Marion City Ry 

Cfntervilie AlbiaASo Ry 










American. . 


















Central lil. Trac. Co 


Ps.Clsd 

St.Bat 

Express _. . . 

Gasoline, Mech. Drive 
Ps.Clsd 


Motor.... 
Motor. . . . 
Trail 


































Central N.Y. Southern R.R 




70- 
21- 
30- 
21-0 
44-4 
32- 

35- 

36- 
44- 6 
37-10 
37-10 

260-Ton.. 


Int. . 

City., 
City., 
City., 
Int. . . 


Ali-eteel. . . 













.Motor.... 
Motor... 
Motor.... 
Motor... 

Motor... . 
Motor... . 
Motor.., . 
Trail 

Motor... . 
Motor... . 
Motor... 


Wood 










Charleston Inf^r R R 


Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps.&Bag 

Flat 

Work 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Clsd 

Gasoline Mech. Drive.. 

El. Loco 

Ps.Clsd 


All-steel,., 
Semi-steel.. 
Semi-steel.. 


Cin. Car. . . 


















Chattanooga Trac. Co 


Brill 


















int.:: 

City.. 
City. . 
City. . 
Int. . . 


Steel 












Semi-steel.. 
Semi-steel., 
All-steel... 
All-steel . . 
All-steel . . . 










Chicago & West Towns Ry 










Cin Car 










Cin. Car.. 








Chicago Great Western K. R 






















C'hicaco Surface Lines 


32- 8 
29- 
37-lOi 
51- 




City. , 
City. . 
Int.. 
City. . 


Semi-steel., 

Steel 

Wood 


Brill 








CityRy.Co. (Davton). .. 


Cin. Car. . . 










Pass 

P8.Clsd 










Cleveland Ry 


Motor... 


Semi-steel., 




Conaoi. . 












Dump 


Motor . . 






Steel .... 






























Yd Loeo 


















Cleveland Southw A; Col Ry 










Wood 










Columbus, Del. & Marion Ry 


Flat 




32- 6 

32- 
40- 
40- 

33- 6 
28- 


Int.. 
Int... 
City.. 
City., 
City;. 
City.. 


Wood .... 










Work 




Wood 










Columbus Ry., Lt. & Pwr. Co 


Snow Plow 


Motor... . 
Motor... 
Motor ... 
.Motor.... 


Wood 

Wood 

Semi-steel . 
Semi-steel.. 

Semi-steel.. 
Semi-steel., 










Kuhlman. 
Cin. Car, 
Cin. Car.. 






Cooestoga Traction Co 


Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Clsd 

Work 


I'CSCo 


ixstd. 




PCSCo 




s 












3-Comp. Dump 

4-Comp. Dump 

EL Loco 

Ps.Clsd 




Motor .. . 
Motor... - 

Motor... , 
Motor... 


39- 9 
25- 81 
2.5-Ton 


Both. . 
Both. . 


Wason 








\ 




























21- 6 
.34- 3 
50-Ton,,. 
26- 6 
43- 
47- 6 
29- 
29- 

40- 8 

28- 3 
39- 2 
,50- 

31- U 

32- 
30-8 
20- 8 
23- 8 

41- 8 

29- 
60- 
71-0 


int... 




Cin. Car... 








Lord... 


Cumb. & Westernport El Ry 


Ps.Clsd 

El. Loco 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps.CUd 


Int... 
Int 


Semi-steel. 


Brill 








NBTn 














Dallas Consol. St Ry 


City.. 
City.. 
Int... 
Int... 
City.. 
City.. 
City.. 
City. . 
Int... 


Semi-steel., 
All-steel... 
Wood 


American. . 








\ 


Danville Trac & Pwr Co 
























Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Clsd 


Motor... 
Motor... 
Trail 


Steel 

.\ll-steel... 
Wood ... 


Cin. Car 












Cin. Car. . 




















NH.l'o 




Semi-steel.. 
Semi-steel.. 
Semi-steel.. 












Dcs Moines City Ry 
















Detroit United Ry 


Express 

Sw.I«;o 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Conv 

Ps.Clsd 


trail 

Motor... 
Motor... . 
Motor .. . 
Motor... . 










\ 














East Liverpool Trac & Lt Co 


Citv.. 

Int.. 

City. 

Int .. 

Both.. 

City.. 

Int 


Steel 










\ 


Easton Transit Co 


Steel 

Semi-steel., 
Wood 


Brill 

Brill 


PCSCo.. 


PCSCo.. 


,1 


N.H.lo 




N.B.Co 




Work 




Steel . . 












Elec. Short Line Ry 


P9.Clsd 

Pass 

Gas-electric 

Flat 


Motor... 

Trail 

Motor... 


Semi-steel.. 










«n(i> 














Int... 


All-steel . 


























Elmira Water, Lt. A R. R. Co 


Ps.Conv 


Motor... 




Int... 


SteeL 




PCSCo.. 


PCSCo.. 












Wood .... 










Work 




22-0 




Semi-steel.. 




























Empire United Rys 


p, cisd 


Motor.... 
Motor . 


2ft- 


City.. 
City 


Semi-steel.. 




PC,<?Cn. 'PCSCo.. 




\ 




Pa clsd 


PCSCo.. PCSCo..' 


N 




Freight 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps & Bag. 


Motor 




Int. . . 
Sub.. 
Sub . 

City.': 
City.. 


Wood 

All-steel .. 
All-steel . 

Wood 

.Semi-steel. 
AIMteel 


Kuhlman. 
Cin. Car... 








EphrataA Lebanon Bt Ry 


Motor... 


41- 6 
43- 
40- 
31- 6 
28-0 








\ 




Cin. Car... 
Cin. Car .. 








Bag kRx 








Ps Clsd . . . 


Motor ... 
Motor .. 










Ni>'" 




Ps.Clsd 











S.Bl'< 










1 





February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



fent was supplied for cars ordered during 1914 

I . I ~i ~ ~ ' ~r "■ ~ — 



81 



Thermo- 
stats 



Window 
Futures 



. . Edwards.. 
. . , Edwards, . 



Edwards.. 



Fare Regis- 
Boxes I ters 



Electric 
Sanitary Car 
Straps I Signals 



Coup- 
lers 



.., Consol. 



Consol . 



Ohmer. . 
Ohmer . . 



Ohmer. . 
Ohmer. . 



Sterling. 



Rico iConsoi.. 

Consol. . 



Rico. . . 



Edwards.. 



Rico 



Fenders 

and I Head- 
Whig ds: lishts 



Consol. . 



. .jConsoi. . 



I Johnson. 



Consol . . 



I Johnson. . 



Ohmer. . .|Rico. 



Rico. 



Ohmer . . 
Ohmer . . 



• - lOhmer. 



Rico. 
Rico. 



Consol. . 
Consol . . 



O-BCo... 



O-BCo.. 



Prov....| 

Esterline.' 

H-B.... 

H-B.... Esterline.. 



H-B. 



Air Trolley Venti- 
Sanders Catch's lators 



O-B.Co. Earll ... 
O-BCo'.; O^B Co. 

'.'.'.'.'.\d-BCd.'. 
'.'.'.'.'. Eatii...'. 



Anti- 
Slack I Climb- 
Adj't'rs era 



H-B. 



Edwards. 
! Edwards. 



Conaol . . 
Consol. , 



Consol . 
Conpo! , 



Consol . 



Ohmer. 
Ohmer . 



Ohmer . . 



Rico. 
Rico. 



Rico. . 



Rico. 
Rico. 



Rico. 



O-BCo. 



Esterline. 



Esterline 



S-W-B. Rico.': 
Peerless. S-W-B . 



Rico. 
Rico. 



Ball 

Bases Roller Doors Cases 

Beannga 



O-BCo.. 

jLord 

Lord.... 

O-BCo'.; 



Earll. 
Earil'.'. 



Peerless . I . . . 



Edwards. 



Edwards. 



Edwards. 



Edwards,. 
Edwards. 



Edwards. 



Johnson. 
Ohmer . . , 

Johnson.. 

Johnson . . 
Johnsop . . 



Consol. . . 
d-BCo. 

Consol. 
Consol . 



O-BCo.. 

aBCo'.; 



O-BCo.. 



H-B. 



H-B... 



Earn 
Earil,; 



Rico. . . 



Rico. 



Rico. 



H-B. 



Ohmer. 



Ohmer. 
Ohmer. 
Ohmer . 



Ohmer . 



Rico. 



Rico. 



Consol . . . 
Consol . . . 



Consol . . . 
Consol. . . 



Consol., 
Consol . . 

Consol . . 



Johnson - 
Johnson , 



O-BCo... 

6-BCo;; 
aBco;; 



H-B... 

PlOT... 



H-B. 



O-BCo 



O-BCo., 

Earii;;;; 



Lord., 



Peerless. S-W-B ; 



Part 
Peerless 



Rico. . . 
Rico.. . 



Rico. . 
Rico. . 



H-B. 
H-B. 



O-BCo... h-b;;;; 



v^§ o°- ■ 5?™ ■ ■ ■ ' co'iiaoi ; ; ; ' o-b co; ; ; 

u-BLo,..,Rico I Conaol... O-B Co... 



Ohmer . . 
i Ohmer. . 



Rico. , . 



Rico Consol ; 



Prov.. 



Esterline. 
Esterline.. 



Esterline. 



Esterline. 
Esterline. 



Esterline., 



Esterline. 



Earll. 



O-BCo., 



..;;; 



Prov... I Esterline. 
Prov Esterline. 



Esterline. 
Esterline. 
Esterline. 



... H-B. 



Earll... 
EarU. 

Earii;; 



Earll. 



Earll... 



Rico. 

Rico, 
Rico.. 



Rico. . . 



Peerless, 






Rico. 



Rico. 
Rico. 



Rico., 
Rico.. 



.. RoUway. 



;;;;;; 



Chil'wtJi.' 



.... Chil'wth , 
. . , . Chil'wth . 



ChU'wth . 

chii'Wi'h ; 



Chil'wth . 
Chil'wth . 



82 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



Table of Advertisers in this Section whose equip 



Purchaser 



EvansvilleSub.A Newb.Ry 

Fargo AMoorhead St. Ry 

Fitchburgft Leominster St. Ry 

Florence & Huntsville Int. Ry 

Fort Dodge, Dea Moines & Southern R. R . . . 

Fort William Elec. Ry 

Freeport Ry. * Lt. Co. ......-•■■■:■•■ •■ 

Gadsden, Bellevue & Lookout Mountam Ky . 

Gary, Hobart & Ea. Trac. Co 

Geneva, Seneca Falls & Auburn R. R 

GoldsboroSt.Ry 

Grafton Lt . & Pwr . Co 

Greeley & Denver R. R 

Guelph Radial Ry 

Hagerstown & Frederick Ry 

Harrisburg Rys ^ 

Havana Central R.R 

Havana Central R.R 

Hershcy Transit Co 

Hocking-Sunday Creek Trac. Co 

Homestead & Mifflin St.Ry 

Houston Elec. Co 

Hutchinson Inter Ry 

Idaho Rv., Lt. & Pwr. Co 

Illinois Central R.R 

Illinois Traction System •■ 

Indianapolis 4 Louisville Trac. Co 

Interborough Rapid Transit Co 

Ithaca Traction Corp 



Jackson Ry. & Lt. Co . 



Jacksonville Trac. Co. ■•;■•;■• v ' ni.' ' 
Jamestown, Westfield & Northwestern R.R. 



Janesville Trac. Co 

Jefferson Tract. Co 

Jersey Central Traction Co 

K«nBa« City, Clay County & St. Joseph Ry . 
Kansas City, Kaw Valley & Western Ry . . . 



Kansas CiW.Lawrence&TopekaElec.R.R. . 

Kansas-Oklahoma Trac.Co 

Keokuk Elec. Co 

Kingston ConBol. R. R ■ ■ ■ 

Lackawanna* Wyoming Valley R.R 

Lancast«r Trac. A Power Co 

Lawton Ry. & Lt. Co 

Lebanon ACampbelltownRy 

Lehigh Valley Tract. Co 



Michigan Railway . 



No. 



Lewisburg & Ronceverte Ry 

Lincoln Trac. Co 

London & Port Stanley Ry 

London St. Ry 

Long Island R.R 

Los Angeles & San Diego B'h Ry — 

Los Angeles Ry.... 

Macon Ry.&Lt. Co ■. 

Mahoning & Shcnango Ky. A Lt. Co 
Manhattan Bridge Three-Cent Lme 
Manhattan & Queens Trac. Corp . . . 

Mansfield Ry., Lt. A Pwr.Co 

Memphis St. Ry 



MeaabaRailway 

Miami Trac. Co .■ ■^; ■■■,;,■■■■ V^ ' \' 

Michigan Central R. R. (Detroit River Tunnel Co.) 



Michigan United Tiac. Co 

Milford AUxbridgeSt.Ry. 

Minneapolis, St. Paul A Sault Ste. Marie Ry ...... ^ . . 

Minneapolis. St. Paul. Rochestor A Dubuque El. Tr.Oo . 

Minneapolis A Northwestern Elec. Ry 

Missouri A Kansas Inter. Ry 

Missouri A N. Arkansas R. R 

Mobile ABaldwin Co. R.R 



Montreal A So. Counties Ry 
Morris (Jounty Trac.Co 



Motley County R.R 

Mt.ManaBeldElcc.Ry 

Mun.Rys.ofSanFrancisco. . 
New Bedford A Onset St. Ry . 
New Jersey A Penna. Tr. Co. . 



General Type 



10 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
3 
2 
2 



4 
3 
1 
3 
1 
3 
1 

10 
1 
1 
4 

30 
1 

10 
S 
5 
4 
1 

15 
6 
2 
1 
1 
1 
4 
1 
5 
1 
1 
4 
4 
1 
6 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

16 

2 

2 

2 

2 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

4 

2 

3 

4 

2 

5 

4 

1 

9 

20 

6 

1 

2 

25 

10 

1 

1 

4 

4 



4 
6 
4 
2 
1 
5 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 

10 
1 
1 
1 
128 
1 
4 
2 



Gondola 

Pa. Clad 

Ps.Conv 

Pass 

Pass 

Ps.Clsd 

Work A Snow Plow. 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Open 

Pass 

Ps.Open 

Ps.Conv 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Clsd 

Pass 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Conv 

Ps. Conv 

Ps.Conv 

Pa.ss .'. 

Work 

Flat 

Snow Plow 



Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Conv 

Ps.Conv 

Work 

Ga.s-electric. .. 
Hopper Bot... 

Pass 

Side Dump. . . 

Ps. Open 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Clsd 

Work 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Clsd 

Bagg 

Sweeper 

I Work 

I El.Loco 

Pass 

Ps.Clsd 

! Ps.Clsd 

! Flat 

! Line Car. . . . 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps.ABag... 

Express 

Gondola 

Flat 

Work 

Express 

Ps.ABag... 

Ps.Clsd 

Snow Plow . . 

Steel Hop . . . 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps. Open . . . 

Ps.Conv... 

Freight 

Work 

Work 

Line 

Private. . . . 
El.Loco... 
Ps.Clsd.... 



El.Loco 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps. Calif. Type. 
Ps. Calif. Type. 
Ps.Clsd 



Length 
Motor or of Car 
Trailer Body 



Motor.... 
Motor.... 

TraU 

Motor... . 
Motor... . 

Motor... . 
Motor... . 

Trail 

Motor... 
Motor... 
Motor... 
Motor... . 
Motor... 

Motor... 
Motor.. 
Motor.. 
Motor . 
Motor.. 
St. Bat. 



Motor... 
Motor... 
Motor... 
Motor... 

Motor... 

1 Trail'.'.'.' 

Motor.. 
Motor.. 
Motor.. 

Motar.. 
Motor.. 
Motor.. 



36- 
33- 
30- 8 



32- 
30- 
30- 



42- 6 



City 
or 
Int. 



All-steel, 
Semi-steel 
or Wood 



Motor... 

Motor... 
Motor... 
Motor... 

Motor... 
Trail. . . . 
Motor... 



Motor... 
Motor... 
Motor... 
Motor... 

Motor .. 
Trail... 
Motor... 



34- 

'21-6 
28- 
32- 

30- 6! 
25- 

31- 8 



32- 6 
21- 
26- 6 
30- 
28- 
71- 

'42-6' 

33- 
28- 8 
20- 8 
32- 
26- 
26- 6 
53- 6 
43- 
28- 3 
4.5- 

45-Ton.. 
30- 
33-10 
42- 2 
34- 
40- 
50- 
48- 
48- 



City.. 

Int.. 

Int., 

Int.. 

City 

City 

City.. 

Int... 

Int... 

City.. 

Int... 

City. . 

Int. . . 

City.. 

City., 

Citv. 

City. 

City. 

City. 

Int.. 



Int... 
City.. 
City.. 
City.. 

int.'!! 

int.!! 

City!! 

City.. 

City.. 

City. 

City., 

Int.. 

Int.. 

City. 

City. 

City! 
Int.. 
Int.. 

int!! 

Int.. 
Int.. 
Int.. 



Wood 

Wood 

Semi-steel. 



Semi-st«el. 
Wood. . . . 
Semi-steel, 



Body 



Pre- 
pay- 
ment 



American. 
Wason . . . 



Wood 

Wood 

Wood 

Semi-steel. 

Wood.!.. 
Semi-steel. 
Semi-steel. 
Semi-steel. 
Semi-steel. 
Semi-steel.. Brill 



Door Com- 
Op. pressor 
Mech. Air 
Cleaner 



Brill. 
Brill. 



Brakes, 
Hand 



N.B.Co.. 



N.B.Co. 
N.B.C0. 



PCSCo. 



PCSCo.. Lord 



Motor... 
Tral... 

Motor... 
Motor... 
Motor , . . 
Trailer. . 
Motor... 



All-steel. . 
Wood... 

Steel 

All-steel.. 

Ali-steel! 

Wood 

Steel 

Semi-steel., 
Semi-steel.. 
Semi-steel.. 

Wood 

Semi-steel.. 
All-steel. . . 
Semi-steel.. 
Semi-steeL. 
All-steel... 

.Ml-steei! ! . 
Semi-steel. 
Semi-steel. 

Steel 

Wood 

All-steel , . 
Wood,... 
Wood... 



Cin-Gar.. 
American. 



PCSCo.. 



Wason — 
Wason .... 
.\merican. , 



pcaco. 



American, 
Cin.Car.. 



Cin.Car. 



Pass 

Ps.Conv 

Sprinkler 

Pass 

Ps.ClBd 

p^gg 

Sprinkler 

Ps.Clsd 

St.Bat 

El.Loco 

Wreck Crane 

Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Clsd 

Eipress 

Ps.Clsd 

Pass -. 

Snow Plow 

Gasoline, Mech, Drive. 

Gafl-elec 

Gas-elec 

Pass 

Gas-elec 

Pass 

GasoUne 

Service 

Flat 

Flat 

Ps.Clsd 

Sweeper 

Gasoline, Mech. Drive, 

Express 

Ps. Calif. Type 

Flat 

P«.Ctod 

Ban 



Motor . 
Motor.. 



Motor,.. 
Trail. . . . 

Motor,., 
Motor.. 
Motor.. 

Motor,. 
Motor.. 
Motor,. 
Motor.. 
Trail... 



Motor.. 
Motor.. 
Trail... 
Motor.. 

Motor,. 



Motor,. 



30- 
40- 
50- 5 
21- 
26- 

31- 2i 
18- 
34- 
30- 8 
45- 

40- 
30- 
33- 
.50- 2 

25-Ton.. 

41- 
39- 

60-Ton . 
21-0 
22- 7 
50- 
.50- 
46- 
20- 
45- 
33- 3 
33- 
1»- 6i 
31- 6 
30- 3 

"49^6 

i2(^Ton. 

"67-6 
61- 
61- 
61- 
86- 8 

76^' 6' 



38-10 
70- 
22- 



Kiihlman. 
Brill 



Heaters 



NJ8.C0.. 



N.B.CO. 



Lord. 



Cin.Car., 
Cin.Car, 



Int... 
Int... 
City. . 
City.. 

City!! 
City.. 
Int. . . 
Both. , 
Both. , 
Both.. 
Both. . 
Both., 

City!! 
City. 

City! 
Int.. 
City. 
City. 
City. 
City. 
City. 
City. 
City. 
City. 
City. 
City. 
City. 
Int.. 
City. 



Int. . . 
Int... 
Int. . . 
Int. . 
Int.. 

int!! 

Int.. 
Int, . 
Int., 
Int.. 
City. 
Int.. 



w'dASt'r.i!!!!!!.... 
Wood 

Semi-steel.. American. . 
Semi-steel. . ■ .American. . 

Wood iWason.... 

All-steel-.. 

All-steel. ..ICin. Car... 

Wood iBrill 

Semi-steel.. jBrill 

Wood I 

Wood 
Wood 



Consol. 



Consol. 
Consol. 



Consol. 
Consol. 



N.B.Co.. 
N.B.C0.. Consol. 



Lord Consol... 

Lord Consol.. J 



N.B.Co 



Consol . 



Consol . 
Consol . 



N.B.C0. 



Wood,, 
Wood. 



Semi-steel., 
Semi-at€el. 

Semi-steel. 
Semi-steel. 
Semi-steel. 
Semi-steel. 
Compos. . 
Semi-steel. 
.Ml-steel.. 
Semi-steel. 

Wood 

Semi-steel. 
SflUn.Fr 
St'lUn.Fr. 

Steel 

Steel 

Wood 



American. 
American. 



Brill. 



N.B.C0. 



PCSCo. 



Southern . 

Brill 

Brill 



Motor.. 
Motor . 



Motor.. 



34-0 
36- 
28- 3 
70- 
38-0 
32- 4 
40- 
82- 
48-0 



Int.. 
City 
Int . 
Int, , 
City. 
Int.. 
Int.. 
Int.. 



All-steel, . 
All-steel.. 
All-steel. . 
All-steel., 
All-steel. 

All-steel! 
Steel.... 



Wason. 



Wood... 
Steel 



Wood 

All-steel... 

Semi-steel. 

I All-steel,., 

Semi-steel. 

I Semi-steel. 

AU-staol.. 

I Steel 



PCSCo. 



N.B.C0. 



Consol . 



Consol . . 



Consol. 



Lord. 



N.B.C0. 
N.B.'Co! 



Consol. 



Ni.Co.. 
Lord 



Consol. 
Consol. 



N.B.Co. 
N.B.Co. 



Cin.Car. 



an.Car. 
Brill... 



Consol 
Consol 



Consol 



Lord. 



N.B.C0. 
N.B.'Co! 



Conso 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



ment was supplied for cars ordered during 1914 



83 



Curtain 
Fixtures 



Thermo- 
stats 



Cur.S.Co. 
Cur.S. Co. 



■Cur.S. Co. 
<}ur.S.Co. 



Cur.S. Co. 
Cur.S. Co. 
Cur.S. Co. 



Window 
Fixtures 



Fare 
Boxes 



[■•■• 



3nr.S.Co.. 



3«r.8. Co. 
3ur.R.Co. 
V.S.Co. 

;ur!s.'co'.: 

hir.S. Co. 



Jur.S.Co.. 
iur.S.Co.. 



Johnson . . 
Johnson . . 



Regis- 
ters 



Sanitary 
Straps 



Consol. 



Edwards. 



. Edwards. 



Edwards. 



Consol. 



Johnson . 



Ohmer . 



Ohmer . 



Rico. 
Rico. 



. . Ohmer. 



nr.S.Co. 
ur.S.Co. 



lur.S. Co. 



ir.S.Co. 
ir.S.Co. 



ir.S. Co. 
ir.S. Co. 
ir.S. Co. 

ir^S.Co. 
ir.S.Co. 



ir.S.Co. 
ir.S. Co. 



ff.S.Co. 



T.S.Co., 
r.S.Co.. 



r.S.Co.. 



r.S. Co. 



Johnson. 



Edwards. 



■.S.Co. 



Edwards.. 

Edwards.. 
Edwards.. 



Edwards. 



Edwards. 
Edwards. 



Edwards. 



Edwards. 
Edwards. 



Edwards 



Sterling. 



Rico. 



Rico. 



Johnson . 



Ohmer . 
Ohmer. 



Ohmer. . 



Ohmer. 



Johnson. 



Rico. 



Rico. 



Electric 

Car 
Signals 



Coup- 
lers 



Fenders 

and 
Whlgds 



Head- 



. . Prov... 



O-BCo.. 



Consol. 



Consol . 



Consol. 
Consol. 



Consol. 



H-B... 



Prov. 
H-B.! 



Consol . . 
0-BCo.. 
0-BCo.. 
0-BCo. 
0-BCo.. 
0-BCo.. 



Consol. 



Consol. 



0-BCo.. 



0-BCo.. 
0-BCo.. 
0-BCo.. 
0-BCo.. 
0-BCo.. 



0-BCo.. 
O-BCo.. 



H-B. 



H-B. 
H-B.' 



Rico 

Rico 



Rico. .. 



Consol.. 



Consol. 



0-BCo.. 
0-BCo.. 
0-BCo.. 
0-BCo.. 
0-BCo.. 



H-B. 



Consol. 
Consol. 



0-BCo... 



Consol.. 



0-BCo.. 



0-BCo.. 



0-BCo. 
0-BCo. 
0-BCo... 
0-BCo. 



0-BCo.., 



Esterline. 
Esterline. 



Esterline. 
Esterline. 
Esterline., 
Esterline., 

Esterline.. 

"Esterline.. 
Esterline. 



H-B... 



H-B. 
Prov.... 



Esterline. 
Esterline. 



Esterline. 



EsterUne. 



Esterline. 



Prov.... 



Air 

Sanders 



Trolley Venti- 
Catch's lators 



EarU., 



Earil. 



Earn... 



Slack 
Adi't'iB 



EarU. 



Earll... 



0-BCo. 
0-BCo. 
0-BCo. 
0-BCo. 



EarU. 



EarU. 
EarU. 



Esterline. 



EarU. 



Anti- 
Climb- 
ers 



TroUey 



Ball 

or 

Roller 

Bearings 



SW-B.. Rico. 
S-W-B. 



Trap 
Doors 



Gear 

Cases 



RoUway. 
RoUway. 



Rico .... 
Rico . . 



Rico.. . 
Rico. . . 



ChU'wth . 
Chii'Wtii '. 



Rico... 



Rico 

Rico 

Rico 

Rico 

Rico 

Rico 

Rico 

Rico. . . 



Edwards. 



0-BCo. 
0-BCo. 



Rico. 



Rico. . . 



Rico 

Rico 



0-BCo. 
0-BCo. 



Edwards. 



Edwards.. 
Edwards, 



Chil'wth ' 



. . chU'Wth ■ 



84 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



Table of Advertisers in this Section whose equi 



Purchaser 


No. 


General Type 


Motor or 
Trailer 


Leneth 
of Car 
Body 


City 
or 
Int. 


AU-steel, 

Semi-fiteel 
or Wood 


Body 


Pre- 
pay- 
ment 


Door 

Op. 

Mech. 


Com- 
pressor 

Air 
Cleaners 


Brakes, Hca 
Hand 




50 
1 
200 
1 
1 
6 
6 
2 
2 

12 
1 
1 

16 
5 
2 

20 
3 
1 
5 
4 

14 
1 
4 
1 
2 
8 

24 
6 
2 
1 
2 

4 
4 

2 
5 
8 
2 

T 

5 

1 

50 

50 

1 

3 

4 

4 

3 

3 

3 

1 

3 

4 

15 

10 

1 

6 

1 

1 

12 

1 

1 

50 

32 

4 

1 

1 

12 
2 
1 
1 
8 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
5 
2 
2 
1 
3 
11 
41 
2 
1 
4 
10 
1 
1 
2 
1 
8 
2 
1 
6 
6 
11 
1 
1 
12 
10 
10 
2 
1 
4 


Ps.Clsd 


Motor. . . . 


47-8 


City.. 


Semi-steel., 


Southern.. 


PCSCo... 


PCSCo... 






N Y Central & H. R. R. R 


Wreck Crane 

Ps.Clsd 










Motor... . 
Motor,., . 
Motor... 
Motor... 
Motor,.., 
Motor... 
Motor... . 
Motor... 
Motor... . 


66- 2} 
130-Ton 


S.&E.. 


All-eteel . 






Conaol 




N.B.Co 

Conn 


New York New Haven & Hartford R. R 


El. Loco 
















45-0 
55- 6 
45- 

34-Ton. . . 
51- 

270-Ton.. 


int.'!; 
City.. 

int!!! 
Int. . . 


Wood 














Ps.Clsd 










Lord... 


tl.B.Co., Cons. 
N.B.Co.. Cons 
N.B.CO 




Ps.Clsd 


Semi-steel. 










EI.Ixwo 


Steel 












Ps.Clsd 

El.Ixwo 


Semi-steel., 










Norfolk & Western Ry 
















Ft. Loco 




All.«teel... 














Ft. Loco 


Motor.... 






W'd&Sfl.. 














Ps.Clsd 


Motor... 

Motor..!! 

Motor... 

Motor.... 

Motor... 

Motor.... 

Motor ... 


35- 5i 
42- li 
26- 
33-9 
60-0 
20- 8 
50-3 
50- 
38- 6 
36-0 
54- 8 
45-0 


City. . 
Int. . , 
City.. 
City.. 
Int.. 
City.. 
Int... 
Int... 
Int. . . 
Int. . . 
Int... 
Int. . . 


Semi-steel.. 

Wood 

Steel 










N.B.CO 




Ps.Smok 

Ps. Conv 










North Carolina Pub Ser. Co 










Cons 




Ps.Clsd 


Semi-steel- 
AlUteel... 
Semi-steel.. 
Steel . . . 










NJi.Co.. Cons 




Ps.Clsd 








Lord 




Ps.Clsd 


Wason 








N.B.C0.. Cons 


Ohio Elec Rv 


Ps.Clsd 




PCSOo... 


PCSCo... 






Express 


Wood 












Box Ft 


Wood .... 








r"- 




Box Ft 




Wood 














Ps.&Smoking 

Express 


Motor ... 
Motor... , 


Semi-steel.. 












Otseco & Herkimer R. R 










Lord 




Gondola 




































Ps.Clsd 


Motor... 
Motor... 


68- 1 
38-0 
65- 


Int.., 
City. . 
Int... 


All-steel... 










Cons 


Pacific Gas & Elec Co 


Ps. Calif. Type 


Semi-steel.. 
All-steel... 


























Pass 


St.Bat . . 














Parkersburg Marietta & Int. Ry 


Ps.Clsd 


Motor ... 
Motor,.. . 
Motor... . 


50^6 ' 

38-0 

22-0 


Int. . . 
City. . 
City. . 


All-steel. . . 
Semi-steel. 


Cin.Car... 


PCSCo... 


PCSCo 




Lord 




Ps.Clsd 








Ps.Clsd 










... 












PCSCo... 


PCSCo... 






Pennsylvania & Ohio Ry 


Pass.&Smok 

Ps.Clsd 


Motor... . 
Motor.... 
Motor,.. , 
Motor... 
Trail 


31- 8 
54- 6 
30- 

44- 6 
62-0 
62- 
25-0 
64-0 
35-0 

45- 2 
4.5- 2 
26- 
26- 
32-0 
21-0 
47-0 
50-0 
50-0 

50-Ton... 


int. . . 
Sub. . , 
City. 
Int... 
Int. . . 
Int.. 

int!!! 

Int... 
City. , 
City. , 
Citv. , 
City.. 
City, . 
City.. 
Int... 
Int. . . 
Int... 

int 


Wood 

AU-steel... 










Penn. R. R. (also 84 pass, coaches equipped with motora). . 










Com 


Peterborough Radial Ry 


Ps.Clsd 


Wood 










N3.Co.. Coni| 


Phila.&GarretsfordSt.Ry 


Ps.Clsd 










Lord ... 




Ps.Clsd 


All-steel. . . 
AUH.teel, . . 
Wood ... 










N.B.C0 . 




Parlor 












Ft. Loco 
















Ps.Clsd 


Motor... 
Motor.... 
Motor... . 
Motor... . 
Motor... 
Motor... 
Motor... 
Motor... , 
Motor... 
Motor.... 

Trail 

Motor... 


Wood 










N.B.CO 




Express 


Wood .... 










Pittsburgh Rys 


Ps.Clsd 


Steel 










N.iB.Co,.Ci)4 

N.B.Co..Con[ 

. . , . Con 




Ps.Clsd 


Steel 











Port Arthur Municipal Ry 


Ps. Conv 


Wood 










Ps.Conv. 


Semi-steel. 










Con,. 


Port Arthur Traction Co 


Ps.Clsd 












N.B.Co.. Con 

Con:, 






Semi-steel., 
Steej 












Bagg.AMail 

Ps.Clsd 


Brill 








Con 


Portland Ry. Lt.&Pwr.Co 










Lord .... r 




Ps.Clsd 

El. Loco 














Steel 














Ps.Clsd 
















Ps.Clsd 


Motor... 




















Ps.Clsd .. 


Motor... 
Motor... . 


34-0 
32- 
28-0 
33-0 
18- 
50- 
38-0 
21- 
.34- 
29- 
28-0 


Int. . . 
City 


Wood .. 










Lord 




Ps.Clsd 














Cit.v!! 
City.. 
City.. 
City.. 
City.. 
City.. 
City 


Wood ... 
















Trail 


Steel 
















Wood ... 












Puget Sound Trac, Lt. & Power Co. (Bellingham Div.) . . . 


Ps.Conv 


Motor.... 
Motor.... 


Semi-steel.. 
Semi-steel. 










N.B.CO 
Lord ' 


Puget Sound Trac, Lt. & Power Co. (Seattle Div.) 


Ps.Clsd 




Flat 


Wood 












Ps.Clsd 


Motor..., 
Motor.... 
Motor... 




























N.B.Co 
Lord... 


Richmond Light &R.R. Co 


Ps Clsd 


All-fiteel 




PCSCo... 


PCSCo.. 






Ps Clsd 










Rockland, Thomaeton & Camden St. Ry 






30- 


Int.. 
City 














Saginaw Bay City Ry 


Sprinkler 














N.B.CO 
N.B.CO. 


St John Ry 


Ps Clsd 


Motor... 


31- 


City.. 
City 


Wood 










St. Joseph Ry. Light, Heat & Power Co 


Pass 














Work 




















St. Joseph Valley Ry 






66- 


Int... 
Int... 
Sub. , 
Int... 
Int.., 
Both,. 
Both,, 
Both, , 
Both,, 
Both,. 
City , , 
Int . . , 
Int... 
Int. . . 
Int 


All-steel . 












St. Louis Southwestern Ry 


Gas-Elec 




All-steel 












St. LouLs Water Works Ry 




Motor... . 
Motor... . 
Motor,.. , 
Motor.... 
Motor... . 
Motor... 
Motor... 


39-0 
51- 
51-0 
36-0 
40-0 
46- 
40- 
20-0 
31-8 
59- 8 
58- 7i 
50-0 
50-0 












( 


St. Paul Southern Ry 


Ps Clsd 


Semi-steel 










N3.C0. 


















Ps Open 


Wood 










i43.C0j«i| 






Semi-steel.. 
Semi-steel. 


Brill 










Ps Conv 










!!!..:. 911 






Semi-steel. 
Wood 


Brill 








HI 




Flat 










'•"•''11 


ealtLake&Utah R.R 


Ps.Clsd 


Motor ... 
Motor... 

Trail 

Motor... 
Motor,... 


All-steel .. 












Ps Clsd 


All-steel 










N3.C«!^" 




Ps Clsd 


\ll-steel 












Ft 


All-steel .. 














El Loco 














San Antonio Trac. Co 


Work 














Lord 

Lord 

N3.C0.. 
























Ps. Calif. Type 

Ps Clfld 


Motor ... 
Motor... 
Motor.... 


50-0 
39-4 
35- 
34-0 
30- 6 
42-0 
24-0 
49- 


City.. 
City.. 



City!! 
City. . 

int!!! 
City.. 












Santa Barbara & Sub. Ry 


Semi-steel. 
Wood 


Brill 
























FhS 


Wood 














Ps Clsd 


Motor... 


Semi-etecl.. 


Brill 








N.B.CO. 


















Motor.... 
Motor.... 


Wood 


Brill 












Ps.CM 




PCSCo... 


PCSCo... 




N-B.Co 
N.B.CO. 












Pa Clad 


Motor... . 
Motor... 
Motor.... 
Motor.... 
Motor... . 
Motor... 


38- C 
30- 1 
51-0 
39-0 
38-0 
28-0 
46- 8 




j 










Rtfttr Rclt Floe St Rv 


Ps Conv 


Int. . . 
Int, . . 
City.. 
Int. . . 
City. . 


Serai-steel. 
Wood 


Brill 


PCSCo... 


PCSCo... 


Lord... 










N.B.CO. 




Ps Clsd 


Scmi-steel., 












Pg Clsd 














Ps Clad 


AU-steel.... 










N.B.CO. 




Pass 














Gas*eleo 


Motor 


Int, . . 
City.. 
City,, 
City.. 
Int... 
Int.. 
City.. 


Steel 














I^ Op«n 


Motor... 
Motor... 
Motor... . 


38-10 
28- 
30- 
65- 


Wood ... 














Pa Clad 




Rrill 


PCSCn 


PCSCo... 
PCSCo... 


Lord... 






Pa Conv 


Srmi-steei.,lWason IPCSCo... 




N.B.CO. 




Pass 


Steel 














Wood 

Semi-steel.. 


iCiihimu. . PCSCo... 


PCSCo.'. 




NJi.'C!i|^H 




Pa Cbd 




33-2 


































11 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



85 



mt was supplied for cars ordered during 1914 



Thermo- 
stats 


Window 
Fixtures 


Fare 
Boxes 


Regis- 
ters 


Straps 
Sanitary 


Electric 

Car 
Signals 


Coup- 
lers 


Fenders 

and 
Whigds 


Head- 
lights 


1 

Air Trolley 
Sanders ' Catch's 


Venti- 
lators 


Slack 
Adj'fra 


Anti- 
Climb- 
ers 


Trolley 
Bases 


Ball 

or 

Roller 

Bearings 


Trap 
Doors 

i 


Gear 
Cases 




Edwards. 








Consol 








;F.iirll 






Rico . 








Chil'wth. 






































Edwards. . 








Consol 














S-W-B. 


Rico 








Chil'wth . 
















































































rinhn 














Rico... 
Rico. . . . 


O-BCo.. 










Edwards.. 








Consol . ItT-T* Cn 














O-BCo. 
















O-BCo. . 
















O-BCo.. 


, 








Edwards.. 















































































































































Edwards.. 








O-BCo... 
0-BCo... 


O-BCo 






O-BCo 








Rico 










Edwards.. 




Ohmer. . . 




O-BCo 






O-BCo 


































Earll 


















Edwards.. 


Johnson. . 








O-BCo... 
O-BCo 




Esterline. 


O-BCo 
























Rico 


O-BCo. . 
Consol 


Earll 






Rico. . . . 


0-B Co- 














Ohmer. . . 
































O-BCo... 


O-BCo 






0-B Co PBorloan 




Rico... 






















O-BCo 










Rico 
























O-BCo 




















































































































Earll 



























































































Edwards.. 




Ohmer... 


























Edwards.. 








Johnson. . 












EstCTlinp 






















































































RoUway. 












Sterling.. 


Rico 


Consol... 
Consol . . . 
Consol... 


O-BCo 






O-BCo 








Rico. 














O-BCo 






O-BCo 
























Sterling. . 




O-BCo 






O-BCo 
























Ohmer... 


































Ohmer. .. 
































Edwards.. 
































Chil'wth . 
















H-B 
























Edwards.. 










O-BCo 








Earll 






Rico. . . 






Edwards.. 












Rico 




O-BCo 














Rico 






















O-BCo 








































Esterline 






















Edwards.. 




Ohmer. . . 


Rico 





























_, 








































Sterling . . 
















Peerless. 
Pewless. 
















Edwards. . 


. 


Sterling . . 












































































0-B Co" 




































O-BCo 


























Edwards.. 









Consol . . . 


O-BCo 














.. . 













































Edwards . 
Edwards. . 





































Ohmer . . . 








































































Rico 


















iUco 
















































Edwards, . 
Edwards,. 




Sterlini; . . 




Consol . . . 
Consol . . . 


0-13' Co... 
O-BCo. . 
O-BCo 


H-B.... 
H-B 












Rico. . . , 
Rico . 








Chil'wth . 


Johnson. . 


Sterling . , 




ChiPwth.. 




















Rico 


























































O-BCo 














Rico 












Edwards.. 
























Rico . 












Edwards.. 








Consoi... 






Esterline. 




O-BCo 






Rico. . . . 
















O-BCo 
























































(■ 




Johnson.. 






Consol 








Lord 






8-W-B 












C (onsol... 






Rico 






H-B... 






Earll 
















r 


1 Johnson. 




Consol... 


O-BCo 


















































































Rico 






































Lord... 







































































































































■; 


























Consol 
















Rico 




































































































































































































































Edwards." 


















Earil 




























* 
























Edwards.. 






























Edwards 




;:::::;■■ 




































■:::::::: 














H-B.::; 


Esterline.. 
Esterline.. 


O-BCo.. 




















Edwards.. 




f?terling. . 
Sterling.. 


Rico 


Consol 






Earll 






Rico 












. Johnson . 


Consol . . . 




H-B 




Earll 








































Rico 














































"1... Edwards.. 




Sterling,, 


Rico 


Consol 




H-B 








Peerless. 


S-W-B.. 


Rico . . 
























Earll 
















































i.'lwards.. 




Ohmer. . . 














































Esterline, 
Esterline.. 










Rico! ! ! 
















Ohmer! '. . 


Rico 






Prov.... 












Rico. . . . 

















Ohmer!!! 


Rico 








Esterline-! 










Rico. . . . 
Rico... 








Chil'wth . 


•ixd::: 






Ohmer!!! 




Consoi!!! 




h-b!!!! 












flico. . . . 

Rico 

Rico.... 

















Ohmer!!! 






O-BCo... 


H-B 



























































































86 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Februaky 6, 1915 



Table of Advertisers in this Section whose eq 



Purchaser 


No. 


General Type 


Motor or 
Trailer 


Length 

of Car 
Body 


City 
or 
Int. 


All-steel, 

Semi-steel 
or Wood 


Body 


Pre- 
pay- 
ment 


Door 
Op. 
Mech. 


Com- 
pressor 

Mr 
Cleaners 


Brakes 
Hand 




1 
4 
3 
5 

1 

1 

1 
50 

2 
12 

2 

1 

3 

2 

2 

6 

2 

1 
26 

2 
10 

5 
60 

6 

6 

1 

1 

5 
85 
68 
18 

6 

2 

1 
10 

3 

6 

3 

1 

2 ■ 

5 

4 

3 

1 

2 

4 

1 

1 

3 

3 

6 

1 

2 
20 

1 

4 
10 

4 

1 

1 


Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Clad 

Gaaoline, Mech. Drive. 
Pa CM 


Motor... . 
Motor.... 


28- 
41-0 
10- 
34-5 
70- 
45-0 
28- 
24-0 
40-0 
26- 
29-0 
29-0 
20- 8 


City.. 
Int... 
Int...i 
City.. 
Int... 
Int... 
City.. 
City.. 
City.. 
City.. 
City.. 
City. . 
City.. 




Brill 






N.B.CO 






Cin.Car... 












All-steel... 














Motor... . 












N B Co 




Gasoline, Mech. Drive. 


All-steel . . 














Trail 

Motor... 
Motor.... 
















Ps.Clsd 


All-8t«el... 














Ps.Conv 


Semi-st*el.. 
Wood 


Brill 


PCSOo.. 


PCSCo.. 








Snow Plow 














Wood . .. 


















Wood 












WinRCar 




Wood 
















Motor.... 


Semi-steel.. 


Brill 








Lord... 


Toledo*: Western R.R 


Cars 














Ps.Clsd 


Motor ... 

Trail 

Motor... . 


51- 
45- 
4ft- 
28-3 
26-0 
53-0 

32- 8 
30- 6 
48-0 
27-4 

33- 
31-61 
35-0 
70-0 
30- 8 


Int... 
Park.. 
Int. .. 
City.. 

aiy.. 

Int... 
City.. 
City.. 
Int... 
Both. . 
City. . 
Int... 
City. . 
Citv 


Steel 











N.B.Co 


Toneka Rv . . 


Pass 


Semi-steel.. 














Ps CIsd 


































Tnil 

Motor... . 
Motor.... 
Motor.... 
Motor... 
Motor.... 


Wood ... 














Rail Trucks 

Ps Clsd 


All-steel. . . 














Semi-steel.. 
Semi-steel.. 


Brill 

Brill 


PCSCo.. 


PCSCo.. 


TjirH 


N.B.Co 




Ps.Clsd ■ 


PCSCo.. 


PCSCo.. 


N.B.Co 


Twin City Rapid Transit Co 












Ps.Clsd 

Ps.Clsd 

Snow Plow 


Semi-steel.. 
Wood .... 


American. . 


PCSCo.. 






N3.Co 


TfnionSt Rv ..... 








Lord .. 




Wood 






























Tlninn Pacific R R 


Gasoline, Mech. Drive. 




All-steel. 














Motor.... 


Semi-steel.. 


Brill 










United Rva of St Louifl . . 


Pass . ... 














Ps. Clsd 


Motor... 
Motor... . 
Motor... . 
Motor.... 
Motor.... 


36- 
36- 
21- 
41-0 
51- 
51-2 
.50- 8 
21- 9 
30-0 
30- 8 

60-Ton... 
68- 
61- 
30- 6 
56- 
46- 
36- 

35-Ton. . . 


City. . 
City. . 
City. . 
Int... 
Int. . . 
Int... 
Int. . . 

int.!; 

Int... 
Int... 
Int.. 
Int... 
Int... 
Sub. . . 
Both.. 


Semi-steei.. ' American.. 'PCaCo..'PC.SCo.- 








Ps Clsd 




1 








Ps.Clsd 














Walla Waila Valley Ry .... 




Semi-steel. ' 








N.B.Co 




Ps.Clsd 


All-steel.. .. 


Cin.Car... 










Ps & Bag . . . 


All-steel... 
All-steel. . . 
Wood .... 


Cin.Car... 












Ps.Clsd 


Motor... 










Lord... 


Washington Ry & Elec. Co 


Work 














El.I,oofl 

Ps.Conv 

El Loco 


Motor... . 
Motor... . 
Motor.... 
















Semi-steel.. 
All-steel 


Wason.... 










"Waterloo Cedar Falls & Nor Rv 










N.B.Co 






All-steel.., 














Observ 




Ali-st«el 
















Motor... 
Motor... . 
Motor.... 
Motor.... 
Motor... . 

Motor 

Motor.... 
Motor.... 


Wood 












Wfflt Penn Trac Co . . 


Ps Clsd 


Semi-steel. 














Ps Clsd 
















Wood 














El. Loco 
















Ps Clsd 


40-0 
27-0 
47-0 
55-0 


Int... 
City.. 
City.. 
City.. 
Int 


Steel 

Semi-steeL. 
Semi-steel.. 
All-steel 


Cin. Car. . . 










"Wichita Falls Trac. Co 


Ps.Clsd 










NJB.Co 




Ps Clsd 


Brill 










'Willamette- Pacific Rv 


Gasoline, Mech. Drive. 
Ps Clsd 






























Pass 




33- 

34- 
28-0 
30-0 
46- 
46- 
85-0 


City.. 








Conaol.. 




N.B.CO 




Ps Clsd 


Motor.... 
Motor.... 
Motor — 

Trail 

Trail 


Int... 
City. . 
City. . 
Int... 
Int... 
Int... 
















Ps Clsd 


All-steel . 




















PCSCo.. 


PCSCo.. 




N.B.Co 


Yakima VallevTranBD Co 




Wood 








N.B.Co 


York RyB 


Pass 












N.B. Cc 


Yuma Valiev Rv 


Gasoline, Mech. Drive. 


AU-ateel . 


















■ i 







illll 



List of Articles and Specifications wh 

describing some of the i 



NAMB OP ROAD 

Albany, Southern R.R. 
BartlesviUe Interurban Ry 
Boston Elevated Ry. 
Cambria & Indiana Ry. 
Central N. Y. Southern B. R. 
Charleston Interurban R. R. 
Charlottesville & Albemarle By. 
Chicago Elevated Rys. 



Chicago, Mil. & St. Paul n. R. 
Chicago & West Towns By. 
City Railway, Dayton, O. 
Cleveland Ry. 

Dallas Cons. Elec. St. By. 
Easton Transit Co. 
Editorial 



El- Paso Elec. Ry. 
Empire Dnitcd Railways 
Evanston Ry. 

■Geneva. Seneca Palls & Auburn Ry. 
Ilniiston Elec. Co. 
Ithnea Street By. 
JackponvlUe Traction Co. 
Jersey Central Traction Co. 
Manhattan Bridge 3 cent Line 



Memphis Street By. 
Michigan By. 



TITLE OF ARTICLE PAGE NO. 

New All-steel Cars (or 224 

A single Truck fully enelosed car 85 

Center Entrance trailers 87 

Storage Battery Car (or 1356 

Gasoline Motor Cars for 1409 

Specifications, 12 Closed Cars 1126 

Rolling Stock 906 

New Steel Cars (or 84 

Pressed Steel Cars (or 1234 

Specifications, 128 Cars 508 

Locomotives 1153 

Rolling Stock 468 

Specifications. 20 Pass. Cars 290 

Center Entrance Motor Cars 455 

Specifications. 200 Closed Cars 944 

Speclflcatlons, 15 Closed Cars 1084 

Speclflcations, 9 Single Truck Cars 803 

The All-steel Car 3 

Car Design in 1914 11 

Corrosion of All-Steel Cars 415 

Hybrid Stcel-Dnderframe Car 374 

Life of All-steel Cars 507 

Somnolence In Car Design 294 

Spcclllcations, 6 Closed Cars 1018 

Specifications, 12 City Cars .148 

Specifications, 10 City Cars 439 

Vestibule Prepayment Cars for 174 

Combination Car for Central New York Line 1408 

Specifications. 10 Closed Cars 1369 

Specifications, 10 Open & Closed Cars 191 

Speclflcatlons, 15 Closed Cars 1485 

Specifications, 5 Closed Cars 240 

Boiling Stock 384 

Specifications, 6 SemlConvertlMe Cars 1425 

Specifications, 25 Motor & Trailer Cars 954 

All-steel Cars for 1087 



ISSUE 

Aug. 1. 19 

July 11, 19 

Jan. 9, 19; 

Dec. 19. 19 

June 20, 19 

Nov. 14, 19 

Oct. 17. 19 

Jan. 10. 191 

Dec. 5. 19 

Feb. 28, 19! 

Nov. 21, 19l 

Sept. 12. 19; 

Jan. m. 19! 

Feb. 28, 19' 

Oct. 17, 19 

Not. 7, 19i 

Apr. 4. 19i 

Jan. 2. 19 

Jan. 2, 19 

Sept. 5, 19 

Aug. 29. 10 

Sept. 19. 18 

Feb. 7. 10 

May 2, 16 

Sept. 19. 18 

Feb. 21, 18 

July 25. 18 

June 20, IC 

June 1.1. 16 

July 25. If 

June 27, It 

Aug. 1. ir 

Ang. 2a, It 

June 20, If- 

Apr. 2.' 

May 1'' 



^TiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiffliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHii!!^ 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiMiiiii 



i 

1 February 6, 1915] 

lient was supp 


diei 


ELECTRIC 

d for 


RAILWAY JOURNAL 

cars ordered 


du 


irir 


»g 


19 


14 


87 


j 

tain ' Thermo- 
ures stats 


Window 
Fixtures 


Fare 

Boxes 


Regis- 
ters 


Sanitary 
Straps 


Electric 

Car 
Signals 


Coui>- 
lers 


Fenders 

and 
Whlgds 


Head- 
lights 


Air 
Sanders 


Trolley 
Catch's 


Venti- 
lators 


Slack 
Adj'frs; 


Anti- 
Climb- 
ers 


Trolley 
Bases 


Ball 

or 

RoUer 

Bearings 


Trap 
Doors 


Gear 
Cases 


Co 

















































H-B.... 






Earll.... 








































































Earll... 

































































0-BCo... 














Rico 


















Ohmer... 




{0-BCo... 




















. 




■.O) 










Rico 


Consoi ... 


Lord... 






Earll... 






Rico 


















» 




























































Rollway4 
















































































I.Co. 
















H-B.... 




























































1 Co. 1 














Proy. . . . 






EarU... 
























Rico 








Ester line.. 




















1 Co. 












Consoi . . . 




















































































































































Sterling. . 




Consoi . . . 


























; Co 




Edwards 






Rico 


Consoi . . . 




H-B.... 






Earll... 






Rico 










; Co 










Consoi . . . 
























'.Co. 


Con8oI... 


Edwards.. 


Johnson. . 








' 


H-B lEsterline. 




















; Co. 






Rico 


Consoi . . . 










Esrll... 






Rico 


























































































































tCo.. 














O-BCo... 




























Edwards . 




Sterling' 




Consoi... 


























tco' 




Edwards 


Consoi . . . 






Esterline.. 




O-BCo.. 






Rico.... 
Rico 


O-BCo. 








).Co. 




Edwards 




Sterling. . 




Consoi... 
























i.Co.. 










Rico..... 






H-B.... 


Eaterline.. 
























































!.Co.. 




Edwards. . 










0-BCo... 




















Edwards 




;.Co.. 














0-BCo... 
























I.Co., 


Consoi . . . 


Edwards, 




Ohmer . . . 


Rico 


























ChU'wth 




Consoi . . . 








0-BCo.. 








Rico . 




























0-BCo.. 


















I.Co. 
















ProT.... 
































































Edwards. 


















Earll.... 




























































Ohmer . . . 
































Conaol... 










Consoi... 






































Consoi... 












































































0-B Co. . . 








Earll.... 
















::::: ::::::::: 




































U f,,. 


Edwards.. 




Ohmer... 









































Rico 




0-BCo... 














Rico 
















Ohmer . . . 














































Eaterline.. 












Lord.... 




























Earn.... 




















Johnson.. 


































Rico 






Prov.... 








Peerless. 














ConBol... 








Consoi . . . 


b-BCo..'. 
OB Co... 












Rico. . . . 
Rico. . . . 


O^BCo.! 












Edwards.. 




Ohmer... 







































































1 








! 


1 - . [ 















llilllilllllilillllllll 



IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII^ 



lave appeared in Electric Railway Journal 

ars listed in this table 



NAME OP ROAD 

Michigan United Traction Co. 
Morris County Tr. Co. 
Municipal Rys. of San Francisco 
New York Municipal Ry. Corp. 



Editorial 

New Orleans Ry. & Light Co. 

-Niagara. St. Catherines & Toronto Ry. 

-Niagara. St. Catherines & Toronto Ry. 

Pacific Electric Ry. 

Pennsylvania R. R. 

Phlla. & Garretsford St. Hy. 

Pittsburg Railways 

Portland Eugene & Eastern R. R. 

Puget Sound Traction, Light & Power Co. (Puget 

Sound DIv.) 
Puget Sound Traction, Light & Power Co. (Seattle 

Division) 
Puget Sound Traction. Light & Power Co. (Seattle 

Division) 
Richmond Light & R. R. Co. 
St. Louis Southwestern Ry. 
Scranton Railway 
Spokane. Portland & Seattle Ry. 
Sunset Central R. R. 
Third Ave. Ry. 

Trenton Bristol & Phlla. St. Ry. 
Trenton & Mercer County Tr. Corp. 
Union Electric Co. 
United Railways & Eleo. Co., Baltimore 



Utah Light & Ry. Co. 
Washington Virginia Ry. 



TITLE OF ARTICLE 

New Steel Cars for 

Specifications, 10 Closed Cars 

Specifications, 125 California Type Cars 

The New York Municipal Car — Trucks, Brake, 

Riggings and Draft Gear 

The New York Municipal Car — Body 

The New York Municipal Car — Design 

The New York Municipal Car 

New Cars for 

New Int. Cars for 

Spcclflcations, Int. Cars 

Specifications,. 24 Int. Cars 

Passenger Coaches, Motor Equipped 

St)eciacations. 5 Int. Cars 

Center-Entrance, End-Exit Cars for 

One Man Near-Side Cars 

LIght-Weight Cars for 

Single End Cars 

Specifications, 12 Closed Cars 

Speoiflcations, 32 Closed Cars 

Specifications, 8 Gas-Elec. Cars 

Specifications, 10 Closed Cars 

Gas Electric Motor Car 

Gasoline Cars for 

Single Truck Convertible Car 

Specifications. Single Track Convertible Cars 
Specifications. 5 Closed Cars 
Specifications, 10 Closed Cars 
Specifications, 6 Closed Cars 
Specifications, 85 Semi-Convertible Cars . 
Enclosed Cars for 
Specifications, 24 City Cars 
Specifications. 5 Closed Cars 



miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiii^^ 



PAGE NO. 


ISSUE 


106 


July 18, 


1914 


1237 


May 30. 


1914 


856 


Apr. 11, 


1914 


1378 


Dec. 26. 


1914 


1326 


June 13, 


1914 


1261 


June 6. 


1914 


1243 


June 6, 


1914 


270 


Feb. 6, 


1915 


246 


Jan. 30, 


1915 


751 


Mar. 28. 


1914 


164 


Jan. 16. 


1915 


860 


April 18. 


1914 


1181 


May 23, 


1914 


808 


Apr. 11. 


1914 


85 


July 11, 


1914 


1110 


Not. 14, 


1914 


1022 


Oct. 31, 


1914 


905 


Apr. 18. 


1914 


1036 


Oct. SI, 


1914 


818 


Mar. 14. 


1914 


1369 


June 13. 


1914 


881 


Oct. 15. 


1914 


144 


Jan. 17, 


1914 


3.50 


Feb. 14, 


1914 


Ml 


Mar. 28, 


1914 


148R 


June 27. 


1914 


191 


July 25, 


1914 


1181 


May 23, 


1914 


1425 


June 20, 


1914 


1065 


May 9. 


1914 


86 


Jan. 9, 


1915 


697 


Mar. 21, 


1914 


1237 


May 30, 


1914 





88 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



For the 200 New Cars 

Ordered by the 

N. Y. Municipal Railway 

EDWARDS 
SASH FKTURES 



The superior efficiency of their service as demonstrated 
on the cars of other roads throughout the country natur- 
ally led to the selection of Edwards Sash Fixtures for 
the new lines in Metropolitan New York. For no service 
are requirements more exacting. In no service is 
efficiency more important. Under the most trying con- 
ditions Edwards Sash Fixtures are trouble-proof and 
rattle-proof. 

Take advantage of this service by specifying Edwards 
Sash Fixtures. 




13-0 lock and phantom view of stop bar in operative position 



EDWARDS ALL-STEEL TRAP DOORS 



Write for 
Catalogs 




are the trap doors of permanent satisfaction. Why? Because they don't 
swell, warp and stick in wet weather as wooden doors often do. They 
are noiseless in operation and are virtually trouble-proof. Being made 
of steel they are much stronger and more durable than wood. And — 
reckoning in the fixtures required with wood doors — they are cheaper. 

The efficiency and convenience of a trap door is greatly enhanced 
by the installation of EDWARDS TRAP DOOR LOCKS, which arej 
provided with a powerful starting lever. The pressure on the foot! 
plunger unlocks and raises the door, and the pressure exerted will raise f 
a person standing on the door. These locks are positively automatic and] 
eliminate the hand lift, both on the top of the door and in the platformJ 
and sill. Get acquainted with O. M. EDWARDS SERVICE and write 
for data on all our products. 

THE O. M. EDWARDS COMPANY, INC. 

SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



Window Fixtures. 
All Metal Sash Balances. 
Metal Sash and Mouldings. 
Top, Bottom and Side Weather Stripping^ 
Metal Extension Platform Trap Doors 
All Metal Shade Rollers. 

719 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



89 



CONSOLIDATED 

Car Equipment Specialties 




"EO. 0.5. par. OFfK-^ 



The Electric Heater Wire Tliat Won't Corrode 

The use of this wire in Consolidated Heaters retains all the efficiency 
of our old heater coils but yields a much longer life. The new Con- 
solidated Heaters are thus the acme of coil maintenance economy as 
well as heater efficiency. 




Buzzer 

Signal 

System 



A dependable system for signalling conductor and 
motormen. 

[ Does away with dry batteries, is always reliable and 
gives a clear, distinct signal. 
Operates directly from trolley voltage. 
More than lo.ooo equipments in use. 
Write for bulletins and list of roads using the system. 



Ele ct ro- Pneumatic 
Door Control 




Controlled by push buttons. 

The engine fits snugly in the door pocket and does 

not occupy valuable space in the car. 

Door is always under the control of the gateman and 

can be closed without slamming, in i]/^ seconds. 

Write for bulletins and for list of roads using this 

control. 



CONSOLIDATED CAR -HEATING CO. 



ALBANY 

T171-P 



NEW YORK 



CHICAGO 



90 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 




February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



91 



On the Big Car Orders 
Last Year 



— Boston Elevated, 100 Cars. 

— Chicago Surface Lines, 228 
Cars. 

— Munic. Rys., San Francisco, 
125 Cars. 

— New York Municipal Rail- 
way, 200 Cars. 

— on these and on the small 
car orders for the year our 
hand brakes were specified 
to the tune of more than 



Two thousand five hundred sets. 



This does not take into con- 
sideration the hundreds of sets 
of Peacock Improved brakes 
that were ordered and applied 
to old cars which formerly car- 
ried antique hand brakes. 

It points out the modern 
tendency toward efficiency in 
hand brakes by the roads that 
study and practice efficiency 
methods. 

It is a tribute to the product of 
the 



National Brake Co. 

888-890 Ellicott Sq., Buffalo 



92 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



Fare Collecting 
Devices should 
not be CAR 
Equipment 



The Rooke Register 
is MAN Equipment 

The subject of car equipment now being uppermost, it is 
opportune to consider fare collection as applied to car. 
equipment. 

Most systems become a part of the car and may be rightly 
considered car equipment. 

The Rooke System is not car equipment, but rather man 
equipment, and that is why it is more flexible to meet oper- 
ating and loading needs than any system which becomes 
part of the car. 

The only inflexible part of the Rooke Register is fare 
registration. 

In this it is always thorough and accurate, based upon a 
man-to-man exchange between conductor and passenger. 

In other respects, too, the Rooke System is far in advance 
of car equipment devices because there are no charges for 
interest, depreciation or maintenance connected with it — 
no appliances necessary to operate it. 

Every cent paid for the Rooke System is paid for Service, 
and any improvement which may later be made in the sys- 
tem immediately becomes a part of your system, at no extra 
cost. 

The system is leased on a basis whereby we take care of 
all repairs and replacements. 

In other words, the uncertainty of eventual cost is entirely 
eliminated in the Rooke System. It is a known uniform 
charge which amounts to only a percentage of the actual 
money it saves. 

You install the system, on all types of cars you operate, 
without the expenditure of a penny and without loss of a 
minute in preparing the cars to receive the system and with- 
out friction from employees or the public. 

Get all the facts — and the viewpoints of users. 

Write us for them. 

Rooke Automatic Register Co. 

Providence, R. I. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



93 



Our 1914 Cars 












Recently q noted financier stated that there were three requisites for 
a man's success: honesty, education and thrift. These same requisites 
can be applied to the success of a manufacturing institution; 
HONESTY to cover good workmanship and materials; EDUCA- 
TION to cover versatility of construction and THRIFT to get the 
business. Our honesty is proven by our duplicate orders; our educa- 
tion is proven by the different types of cars that we have constructed; 
our thrift is proven by the record we have made by not having our plant 
closed a single day for the past two years, for the want of orders. 
Let us have your specifications and inquiries. 

Southern Car Co., High Point, N. C. 



94 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



42 



Per Cent 



of the all-steel cars order- 
ed during 1914 for elec- 
tric traction service were 
'^Cincinnati" Cars. 

It is a noteworthy fact 
that the Cincinnati Car 
Co. was awarded orders 
for a majority of the cars 
of this type built — in 
this — the most impor- 
tant year in the advance 
of all-steel cars. 



The Cincinnati Car Co, 



Winton Place 

Cincinnati, Ohio 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



95 



Note Inactive 
Position of 
loosely mounted 
rings in 
lowering 
curtain 




Note Holding 
Position of 
loosely mounted 
rings in 
raising 
curtain 




The passenger may seize 

any part of the curtain 

AND 

The Ring Fixture 

TAKES HOLD when the passenger LETS GO 
And LETS GO when the passenger TAKES HOLD 

The Result: 

The curtain stays in the groove when being raised or lowered 
Remains level and holds fast in any set position 

THOSE ARE THE REASONS WHY 
83% of All the Cars Purchased by Electric Railways in 1914 
Were Equipped with The Ring Fixture ! 

(See Pages 80-87 Statistical Section of this issue) 



Write for This Bulletin 
{It shows you "How" and ''Why") 

Ask for "C-3" 




The action of this fixture in operation is as near the 
automatic as can be obtained. 

In pulling down the curtain the loosely mounted 
rings simply roll back away from the groove and 
allow the pull to overcome strong roller spring tension. 
(See illustration at left.) 

On the raising of the curtain, loosely mounted rings 
assume a wedging position, thus neutralizing the up- 
ward pull of the roller spring and tending to keep the 
curtain squarely in grooves. 

This wedging action is sufficiently strong to hold 
curtain in any set position. 

The Curtain Supply Co. 

322 West Ohio Street, Chicago 

48 Church Street, New York 



96 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 




No Prepayment Car 

is complete 

without a 

JOHNSON 

Registering 
Fare Box 



IN PROOF OF THIS:— 

Sixty leading railway systems are more efficient. 
Sixty leading properties load their cars 20% faster. 
Sixty leading operating boards are enthusiastic. 
Sixty sets of leading railway executives are satisfied. 
Sixty leading operating engineers are convinced. 
Sixty big "leaks" have been stopped up tight. 
Sixty leading systems are getting increased receipts. 
Sixty leading roads are giving us repeat orders. 



JOHNSON FARE BOX COMPANY 



30 CHURCH STREET 
NEW YORK 



JACKSON BOULEVARD AND ROBEY STREET 
CHICAGO 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



97 



The 
Ohmer System 



Throw your burden of worry about fare protection upon 
our shoulders. 

" We have concentrated our attention for years on such 
matters. The Ohmer System is the result. It is a plan 
which has made good in the Electric Railway industry. It 
stands for an idea based on truth and applied practically 
to the relation between manager and man. 

We can tell you ofiE-hand how the general plan can be 
applied, but we want to know just what your local diffi- 
culties are, so we can go into every detail with you. You 
will be under no obligation to us whatever for anything 
we do, and you will possibly be able to add something to 
your knowledge of the subject from our experience. 

Our methods are being applied successfully to meet 
the most difficult situations. 

The continued and growing success of our business, 
and the rapidly increasing number of our clients are proof 
that we can help you if you will let us. 

We manufacture a large variety of practical fare ac- 
counting mechanisms, but more important than the 
mechanism is the basic idea of the Ohmer System. 

Let's get together and co-operate. 



Ohmer Fare Register Co. 

Dayton, Ohio 



98 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



The Three Big Dayton Leaders 




NO. 1 

Dayton Computing Fare Recorders 

for City, Suburban and Interurban 

Service . 

Made in the following standard 

sizes : 

4-fare, 6-fare, 8-fare, lo-fare, 12- 

fare, 15-fare, i8-fare, 20-fare and 

24-fare. 




All Dayton Recorders are guaran- 
teed right in design and construc- 
tion. 

The double-dial fare indicators are a valuable feature, as they constantly 
attract attention when fares are being registered, making both public 
and private inspection easy and effective. 

By the Dayton System every fare is indicated as paid, is registered and 
recorded as indicated and is as effectually checked and verified by the 
double system of recording as money paid in bank, 

NO, 2 

The Dayton standard DB registering 
Fare Box is a masterpiece of mechanical 
construction — right in design — superior 
in material and construction — supreme 
in service. 

Every Dayton Fare Box is guaranteed to 
be practically infallible and indestructible 
under normal conditions of use and will 
give years and years of service at the 
very minimum of maintenance cost. 
Ask us to send you a sample box for 
your examination and trial. 

NO, 3 

The Dayton Combination Fare Box-Re- 
corder is the full and logical develop- 
ment of the fare box method of fare- 
getting and fare handling: 

All cash fares registered through the fare box. 

All fares indicated and registered. 

Indisputable records obtained of the fare collections. 

No figure drudgery. 

No arguments in settlement. 

No money-losing errors in trip sheet footings and extensions — but full 

collections, full settlements, and a square deal for both company and 

employees. 

Write today for information regarding the type of 
fare register equipment in which you are interested. 



The Dayton Fare Recorder Company 

Dayton, Ohio 




Jo S 2i E* 




February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



99 






Get the Concrete Facts 

on 

Coasting Recorders 

1. How you cannot afford to 
operate cars without Coast- 
ing Recorders. 

2. How they will pay for them- 
selves out of their own econ- 
omies effected. 

3. How we will finance the 
purchase of Coasting Re- 
corders during- the present 
financial condition. 

Another prominent railroad adopts 

COASTING RECORDERS 

Northern Texas Traction Co., Fort Worth, Texas 
Stone & Webster, Management 
Just placed an order for a complete equip- 
ment of Coasting Recorders for all its 183 Cars 

Railway Improvement Company 

61 Broadway, New York 

Chicago Los Angeles London 




100 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



Peerless 
Ventilators 



For 




Patented Arch 

Roof Model 

Type 4 



Arch and Monitor Roof Cars 




Its positive 
exhaust freedom 
from down drafts 
makes the Peerless 
the modern venti- 
lator for the mo- 
dern car. 



mftsi^fl^S,-. 



//ow io^roperly yeni,iciLeJ%n,toTp, 



<^ofCs, 



Simply Close Up the Deck 

Sash and Install the 
Peerless Ventilator as Shown 

The change is quickly and easily accom- 
plished — The cost per car very low — 
The result : Proper ventilation auto- 
matically provided at all times without 
the discomforts of down drafts, or dust, 
dirt, rain, snow, etc. 





The adoption of the Peerless by our 
foremost Electric and Steam roads 
for both old and new cars is the 
best evidence of its efficiency. 

Complete information upon request. 

Auto Utilities Mfg. Co. 

SOLE MAKERS 

514-524 Insurance Exchange Bldg. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 



Patented Monitor Roof Type 4 
Phantom View Showing Interior Construction 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



101 



Add this to 



Your 

Statistical 

Table 



The individual consumption 
of "Bound Brook" Bushings 
by the electric railways 
during- 1914 is not listed in 
the table published in this 
issue of the "Electric Rail- 
way Journal" because our 
bushings are handled 
through the intermediary of 
so many supply houses. 

Practically all of the large 
roads* listed in the table 
are, ho w^ ever, users of 
"Bound Brook" Bushings, 
and during 1914 their pur- 
chases of these high efficiency 
bushings aggregated over 
1,000,000 bushings. 

All genuine Graphited 
"Oil-less Bearings" have al- 
ways been made at Bound 
Brook, N. J., in the United 
States of America. 

Insist on the genuine. 





Specify the NEW "Bound 
Brook" Bushing — its new 
feature is your protection 



Trade Mark Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 



Graphite Lubricating Co. 

Bound Brook, N. J. 



102 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



SAFETY FIRST © 

\L 




® STOP, LOOK, LISTEN! ® 

"Safety First" Card Supplied to Chicago School Rooms 

"Safety First" on the Chicago Surface Lines 

is more than a figure of speech. A very comprehensive Safety Publicity Cam- 
paign has been and is being conducted with great energy and ability by Mr. H. L. 
Brownell, Safety Inspector of the Chicago Surface Lines. 

But not only upon publicity do the surface lines depend for safeguarding the 
public. Many will be taught to avoid danger, but some will run before approach- 
ing cars — some will be struck — and only the Safety devices applied to the car 
can save the life at hazard. That is why the Chicago Surface Lines back up 
their campaign by having their cars 



Completely Equipped with 

H-B LIFE GUARDS 

That is why the traction systems of New York, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Buffalo, 
Newark, are completely equipped with H-B Life Guards. That is why over 
100,000 cars in the United States are equipped with Providence Fenders or 
H-B Life Guards. That is why over 200 foreign roads use H-B Life Guards. 
The public is awakened to the need for adequate protection from street car 
accidents. H-B Life Guards afford maximum protection at a minimum cost to 
you. Write for data. 



The Consolidated Car Fender Co., Providence, R. I. 

Manufacturers of The Providence Fender and H-B Life Guard 

Wendell & MacDuffie Co., 61 Broadway, New York 

General Sales Agents 



7198 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



103 





Tomllnson Automatic Couplers — Patented 



O-B Car Equipment 
Materials 



were designed by practical and 
experienced men. 

Before designing, careful inves- 
tigations were made of the require- 
ments of the trade. Suggestions 
were obtained from many railway 
men. 

Thorough tests in service were 
made on every device before it was 
offered for sale. 

The result — a line of devices 
thoroughly in keeping with the 
O-B watchword 

"Quality First" 
Look in Catalog No. 14 for Full Details 



THE OHIO BRASS CO., 
Mansfield, Ohio 





Electric Signals 





Lighting Regulator 
Pat Applied For 




Whistle Valve 




Trolley Base — Patented 



Diaphragm Sander Valve — Pat. 



Trolley Wire PIck-Up 
Pat. Applied For 



104 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



1914 Was a Wonderful Year for 



Railway 




DEN 

TRADE HARK RU. 




\i Headlights 




SR-95, SM-9S— For city 
and suburban cars 




SE-95 — For city and 
suburban cars 




1200 Per Cent More Railwa ys are using Golden 
Glow "Safety Illumination" headlights now than 
twelve months ago. The successes achieved in that 
time by Golden Glow headlights have been unpar- 
alleled in the records of front-end illumination. 

Now Over i6o Progressive properties are lighting their road- 
ways for hundreds of feet ahead by Golden Glow lamps, and 
have discarded wasteful and inefficient apparatus. 

A Year Ago Only a Few had realized the econoiiiy and effi- 
ciency of this equipment. The advance of Goldeii Glow 
installation has witnessed the relegation of arc lights and 
incandescents giving only 35 feet of light to the storeroom or 
to "useless stock." 

The List of Purchasers of Golden Glow headlights fo r new cars 
is only a small portion of the number who adopted them during 
1914. The great majority purchased Golden Glow lamps last 
year to bring existing rolling stock up to date. 

During January, 1915, the shipments of Golden Glow lamps, 
and the orders for February and March delivery, total exactly 
47 per cent, of the entire 1914 business. 



tXT'Co. 



=EsterlinE 

219 East South Street, Indianapolis 



L-128 — For locomotives 



Will Your Property 

in 191 5 be one to secure 
greater illumination and 
to save real money — 
elimination o f repair 
costs, reduction of main- 
tenance, prevention of 
accidents, increase of ef- 
ficiency — by the adoption 
of Golden Glow? 

Send for Catalogue and 

Trial Offer. Represent 

tatives in all principal 

cities. 




T-128 — For interurban 
cars 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



105 



Are Your Cars on the List ? 

55% 

of all city and interurban passenger motor cars purchased during 
1914 — in the United States and Canada — were equipped with the 

Chillingworth Seamless 

Drawn Steel Gear Case 

Doesn't this Record Indicate Merit ? 




CHILLINGWORTH JERSEY CITY PLANT 
is the largest plant in the United States devoted 
exclusively to the manufacture of Gear Cases. 

We are Gear Case Specialists and will solve your 

problems if you will submit them. 

Convince Yourself 

By an examination and test — which you can do without spending any more money 
than you are now paying for steel cases — you have nothing to lose and every- 
thing to gain in the investigation of a case we claim will eliminate bracket and 
rivet trouble — ask those who are using hundreds of them. We will send you 

a list, if requested. 

Thayer & Company, Inc., Agents 

111 Broadway, New York City 



U. S. Metal and Mfg. Co., New York. 

Allen General Supplies, Canada. 

H. F. Keegan & Company, Chicago. 



REPRESENTATIVES: 



Grayson Railway Supply Co., St. Louis. 
W. R. Garten Company, Chicaco. 
Union Electric Company, Pittsburgh. 



106 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 




While you 
are urging 
your men 
to coast 
more 

dorft forget that 

ROLLWAY BEARINGS 

increase coasting time 

Many roads have found that the coasting time 
records of their cars equipped with Rollway Bear- 
ings have been much better than those of cars 
having plain bearings. The difference is of 
course due to the large degree in w^hich Rollw^ay 
Bearings reduce friction. 

This means a considerable saving in power 
consumption. 

Besides, Rollway Bearings effect a very sub- 
stantial saving in lubrication. 

They cut the cost of wheel maintenance, too, 
by reducing flange wear. 

In the aggregate these savings amount to a 
figure you can't afford to overlook. Let us prove 
it by quoting facts on Rollway Bearings from 
actual service records. 




Railway 
Roller Bearing Co. 

Syracuse, N. Y. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



107 



Take Your Choice 

from the two latest and most improved Hand Power Brakes yet designed 

Lord Differential Staffless Brake 



The old mechanical prin- 
ciple of the differential has in 
its application to car brak- 
ing solved the most exacting 
of modern car design re- 
quirements. 



Adequate power 
for heaviest cars. 



furnished 



Only 63/^" space taken from 
dash sheet on platform ; be- 
neath crown piece chain 
alignment can be confined 
to a depth varying from 
1" to S". 




A vertical wheel application 
without bevelled gearing. 

Power mechanism above 
platform, away from mud 
and dirt. 

An automatic pawl in lieu of 
ordinary ratchet dog greatly 
increases efficiency of opera- 
tor. 

An automatic stop which is 
adjustable. 

Pressed steel case; bronze 
bearings; light in weight, 
yet inexpensive. 



Giant Perfected Brake 

A geared brake furnished with two-to-one, three-to-one and four- 
to-one ratios. 

Weighs only 45 pounds. The lightest yet strongest geared brake 
yet designed. 



Requires less space 
below platform 
than any other 
geared brake. 
Automatic oiling 
provision for both 
pinion and gear 
shafts; an exclu- 
sive feature. 
Patented method 
of quick take-up 
of chain has 
proved to be rnost 
effective of vari- 
ous quick take-up 
schemes. 




No lost motion when applying 
brakes by reason of novel pat- 
ented automatic stop. (A pawl 
in gear drum operates through 
spiral cast in roof of housing 
against stop block.) 
More power at a given gear 
ratio than any other geared 
brake. 



Three types of drum are 
ofifered ; also a new special de- 
sign for installation at center 
of stepless, center entrance 
cars. 



Lord Manufacturing Company 

105 W. 40th St., New York City 

We sell Service 
Call on our engineers to assist in solving your brake problems 
"THE RAILWAYS BE PLEASED" 



108 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 




When Studying the Statistical Table 

note the representative class of roads for the cars of which — both city and 
interurban — S. W. B. Automatic Shim Slack Adjusters were specified. This 
includes the 200-car order of the New York Municipal Railways, for which 
the very severe service requirements demand the highest type of equipment. 
The 

S. W. B. Automatic Shim Slack Adjuster 



The S. W. B. automatically takes care of 
brake-shoe clearance and wear on the rigging. 
This means: Shoes last longer — saving 
shoes and mechanics' time. Brakes are sure 
to ac.t quickly — no excessive slack to take up. 
Cars "handle" all alike — motormen always 
know where to "find their brakes." Increased 
life of brake rigging — due to shorter brake 
travel. 



As slack occurs the metal shims drop into 
place under the fulcrum of the brake lever, 
maintaining the correct gap between brake 
shoe and wheel. 

The S. W. B. Slack .\djuster does away 
with brake adjustment troubles completely. 
Write for proof. 



The Sauvage-Ward Brake Co., Inc. 

Whitehall Bldg., New York 



7186 



February 6, 1915] ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 109 




PREPAYMENT 
PROGRESS 



In calling attention to the following list, it is pointed out 
that the present remarkable success of the Prepayment - 
system has been the result of much work, inventive genius 
and unstinting expenditure whenever necessary to experi- 
ment, to improve on old models or to acquire new ideas. 
The list of United States patents which follows is evi- 
dence of liow securely the strength of the Company's 
position is maintained. 

PREPAYMENT PATENTS. 

Date of Issue. Number Date of Issue Number 

May 17, 1898 604,128 Oct. 26, 1909 937,870 

Feb. 14, 1899 619,350 Oct. 26, 1909 938,037 

Oct. 16, 1900 659,699 n„„ g ,909 939 899 

M?;.1^.'i^::;:::::::::::::::;:: ZfA no.so: i^,:::::::;:::::::::-::: ; 
^^'^:::::::::::-::::::l^ {:": iM^lS:::;::::::::::::::::: ^1^;^^^ 

Jan. 7, 1908 875,740 Feb. 15,1910 949,131 

Oct. 20, 1908 901,786 I-eb. 15,1910 949,717 

Oct. 20, 1908 901,787 Feb. 22,1910 949,877 

Oct. 20, 1908 901,902 Feb. 22, 1910 949,878 

Oct. 20, 1908 901,903 March 1, 1910 951,040 

Oct. 27, 1908 902,368 April 12,1910 954,592 

Oct. 27, 1908 902,381 April 12.1910 954,908 

Oct. 27, 1908 902,405 May 10, 1910 957,639 

Nov. 24, 1908 905,100 July 5, 1910 963,722 

Dec. 1, 1908 905,665 Aug 16,1910 967,245 

Dec. 29, 1908 908,199 Nov. 29, 1910 .• 976,924 

Feb. 9, 1909 911,987 Nov. 29, 1910 976,926 

Feb. 9, 1909 912,019 Aug. 29, 1911 1,001,942 

Feb. 16, 1909 912,792 Aug. 29, 1911 1,001,943 

March 2, 1909 913,773 Aug. 29, 1911 1,001,944 

March 2, 1909 913,853 Aug. 29, 1911 1,001,988 

April 6, 1909 917,607 , Aug. 29, 1911 1,001,989 

April 13, 1909 918,344 Aug. 29, 1911 1,001,990 

April 27, 1909 920,062 Aug. 29, 1911 1,002,027 

May 4, 1909 920,183 Aug. 29, 1911 1,002,028 

May 18, 1909 922,395 Aug. 28, 1911 1,002,029 

.May 18, 1909 922,430 Aug. 28, 1911 1,002,030 

June 8, 1909 924,420 Aug. 29, 1911 1,002,031 

June 22, 1909 925,786 Aug. 29, 1911 1,002,180 

Aug. 17, 1909 931,724 Jan. 16, 1912 1,014,907 

Aug. 24, 1909 931,224 July IS, 1913 1,067,681 



Sept. 14, 1909 934,350 Sept. 23, 1913 1,073,930 

Oct. 5, 1909 935,853 Jan. 27, 1914 1,085,255 

Oct. 5, 1909 935,929 March 3, 1914 1,088,936 



In addition to the above, there are forty-six applications cov- 
ering further improvements pending in the Patent Office at 
Washington — further evidence that we are constantly investing 
energy and capital in the interests of our customers and the 
electric railway industry as a whole. 

The Prepayment Car Sales Company owns or controls the 
patents which cover all forms of practical fare prepayment 
cars, and grants a license to Car Builders and Railway Com- 
panies for the building and operation of such cars. 

Prepayment Car Sales Company 

50 Church Street, New York 



110 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



Cut Down Overhead Charges 
on Your Cars 




Bayonne Car Roofing on Car uf Pacific Klectric Railway, Los Angeles, Cal 



with 



ROOFIHG 



26" to 120" wide 



It's waterproof. 
It's not ordinary duck, painted. 
It's specially prepared CANVAS — treated. 

Paint cracks, peels off, exposing the fabric beneath to the deteriorating 
effects of sun, snow, rain. 

BAYONNE CAR ROOFING LASTS. It defies the elements. 
For over eight years BAYONNE Car Roofing has been giving satis- 
faction. It is used on many of the largest steam and electric roads, 
which have adopted it after severe tests. 

Cut down the overhead charges on your cars by adopting BAYONNE 
CAR ROOFING. 

Specify it for your new cars — USE it when remodelling. We will 
be glad to send you a sample book and to quote prices. When writing 
please specify Price List J-40. 

John Boyle & Co., Inc. 

112-114 Duane Street New York City 70-72 Reade Street 

Branch House, 202-204 Market St., St. Louis, Mo. 
Wide Cotton Duck 



7142 



Largest Stock and assortment in United States 
Also headquarters for Cheesecloth and Bunting 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



111 



We are having quite a run on our 

Journal and Motor 
Brass Bearins^s 



and of course we are pleased to see the way 
they have taken a hold on the trade. 

But it stands to reason, doesn't it, that the 
quality and efficiency of these bearings is the 
basis of their success just as that is true of 
any other successful product. 

If you are not already taking advantage of 
the superior economy of Columbia Journal 



and Motor Brass Bearings, now is a good 
time to begin. Certainly, investigate their 
service records ; study them from every angle. 
The first thing to do is to send for the Colum- 
bia Bulletin. 

Probably there will be some of your old 
bearings that you prefer to nurse along awhile 
before replacement. In that case the 



Columbia Rebabbitting Moulds and Lathe Chucks will 
help you get a lot more Service out of your old bearings 

With this outfit you can quickly, easily and economically repair your old wornout 
bearings, restoring to them their original efficiency. 





Columbia Rebabbitting Mould 



Columbia Lathe Chuck 



Get Columbia Bulletins 
on these Columbia Shop Cost Cutters: 



Axle Straighteners. 

Bearings for Armatures and Axles. 

Armature Stands, Armature Buggies. 

Car Hoists, Car Replacers. 

Brake Appliances, Handles, Forgings for 

Ringing, etc. 
Babbitting Moulds. Lathe Chucks. 
Coil Winding Machines for field and 

armature coils 



Coils for Armatures and Fields. 

Coil Taping Machines for Armature 

Leads. 
Rolls for Flattening Leads of Armature 

Coils. 
Car Trimmings, Car Signs — Day and 

Night. 
Banding and Heading Machines. 
Pinion Pullers, Trolley Poles— Steel. 



Commutators, Controller-Handles, Door 

Locks. 
Gear Cases— All Steel and M. I., Pit 

Jacks. 
Grid Resistances, Signal or Target 

Switches. 
Trolley Wheels, Tension Stands. 
Track Special Work, N. W. Cartridge 

Fiuo. 



Columbia Machine Works & Malleable Iron Co. 

Atlantic Ave. and Chestnut St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 



112 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 




Installed July, 1912 
Maintenance to Date: ZERO 

Two and a half years' service and not a dollar spent for maintenance since the 
above steel crossing foundations were laid. What would the same length of 
time have done to wooden tie construction? 

I NTERN ATION AL 
STEEL CROSSING FOUNDATIONS 



mean that your crossings are supported in 
their entirety; the rocking and sagging of 
wooden tie construction is entirely eliminated 
and the consequent breaking avoided ; the 
great bearing area reduces maintenance 
charges to a minimum far below the best pos- 
sible performance of wood ties. In the extra 
life added to the crossing, International steel 
crossing foundations save double their cost. 



These foundations are saving money and bet- 
tering service for leading railways throughout 
the country and some of the largest roads are 
rapidly extending their use on their lines. 
Make a trial installation on your hardest 
worked crossings. Send details of require- 
ments and get list of users. See what they 
say. 



International Steel Tie Company 

General Sales Office and Works : Cleveland, Ohio 



REPRESENTATIVES 



Parrott & Company, 

San Francisco, C'al. 

Los Angeles, Cai. 



Western Eng'g Sales Co., R. 

Seattle, Wash. Salt 

Portland, Ore, 



t Cooper Co., 
ake City, Uuh 



J. E. Lewis & Co., 
Dallas, Texas. 



Maurice Jov, 
Philadelphia. 



William II. Ziegler, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 



February 6, 19151 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



113 




The McGUIRE-CUMMINGS 
Car ^Building Service 

can demonstrate its value to you not only from the Engi- 
neering and Construction standpoint but in the highly 
imnortant essential — COST. 



I 



Send us your inquiry for whatever you 
have in contemplation, and we shall be 
pleased to place at your disposal an advisory 
and co-operative service the decided value of 
which has been acknowledged by hosts of 
our clients. 

The McGuire-Cummings' method of 
building cars is: 

1st: To carefully analyze the traffic con- 
ditions and problems to be met, and to then 



design the cars to fully suit the individual 
requirements in each case. 

2nd: To produce only well built cars of 
substantial construction, based on the most 
advanced engineering practice — cars which 
will render maximum of service at a mini- 
mum of cost. 

You may find it decidedly profitable to 
confer with us relative to your 1915 require- 
ments. 



McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Company 

General Offices — Harris Trust Building, Chicago 

Builders of City and Interurban Cars and Trucks, Work Cars, Sprinklers, Snow Sweepers 
and Plows, Baggage and Express and Combination Cars. 




114 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 




FOR SALE 

10 — 42' Kuhlman Interurban Cars, Baldwin Trucks, 4 

West. 121 Motors. 
30— Brill 20' Closed Cars, G.E. 1000 Motors, Brill 21-E 
Trucks. 

2 — Jackson and Sharp 18' Bar Bodies. 
20 — Jones 20' Closed Cars, G.E. 52 Motors, Bemis Trucks. 
10 — Wason 10 Bench Open Cars, G.E. 1000 Motors, Bemis 
Trucks. 

5 — Brill 10 Bench Open Cars, West. 12A Motors, Brill 
21 E Trucks. 

8— Brill 14 Bench Open Cars, West. 56 Motors, Brill 22-E 
Trucks. 

4 — Brill 30' Express Cars, Brill 22-E Trucks. 

9 — Brill 30' Express Cars complete, 4 G.E. 1000 motors, 
AA-1 Air Brakes, Brill 27-G Trucks. 

8 — Brill 22' Closed Cars, West. 68 Motors, Peckham 
Trucks. 

1 — Jackson and Sharp 20' Car Body. 
20 — G.E. 80 Railway Motors complete. 
12 — G.E. 54 Railway Motors complete. 
60 — G.E. 1000 Railway Motors complete. 
60 — G.E. 800 Railway Motors complete. 
40 — West. 12A Railway Motors complete. 
32 — West. 49 Railway Motors complete. 

8 — West. 38B Railway Motors complete. 
10 — West. 112 Railway Motors complete. 

4 — West. 68-C Railway Motors complete. 

4 — West. 68 Railway Motors complete. 
12 — G.E. 73 Railway Motors complete. 
24 — G.E. 87 Railway Motors complete. 
20 — G.E. 57 Railway Motors complete. 

3 — West. 101 -B2 Armatures, brand new. 

3 — West. 93-A2 Armatures, brand new. 

3 — West. 93A Armatures, brand new. 
22 — G.E. 80 Armatures, brand new. 

2 — G.E. 87 Armatures, brand new. 

2 — G.E. 73-C Armatures, brand new. 

4 — G.E. 67 Armatures, brand new. 
18 — G.E. 57 Armatures (second-hand), two turn. 
30 — G.E. 57 Form A Motor Casings. 
22— K6 Controllers. 
44 — K11 Controllers. 

28— K2 Controllers. ; 

62— K10 Controllers. 
30— K14 Controllers. 
28 — B29 Controllers. 

2 — Sets Brill 27G Trucks, 4' 6" wheel base. 

6 — Brill 21 E Trucks, 7' 6" and 8' wheel base. 
10 — Dupont Trucks, 7' 6" wheel base. 

All of the above apparatus Is in first class condition for 
Immediate service. For further particulars apply to 

W. R. KERSCHNER CO., Inc., new y^rk, n?y! 



MACGOVERN AND COMPANY, 

INC. 

FRANK MACGOVERN, Pres. & Gen. Mgr. 

114 LIBERTY STREET NEW YORK CITY 

'Phone, 3375-3376 Rector 

60 CYCLE ROTARY CONVERTERS 

2—1000 K\V. Gen, Elec, type IIC, 6 phase, 360 RPM., form P, 
600 volts DC, with AB-BI Transformers, 2300 V. pri- 
mary; also switchboard panels and instruments. 

2— 500 KW. Gen. Elec., type HC, form P, 6 phase, 12 pole, 
600 RPM., 575 volts DC., with AB-BI Transformers, 
2300 V. primary; also switchboard panels with instru- 
ments. 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY. 

THIS IS OF NBCBSSITY ONLY A PARTIAL LIST— 
SBND FOR CATALOG 



An Unusual Bargain 

One double truck, single track snow plow, 
length over all 40 ft., width 8'6", height 
lo'p", truck centers I3'8" wheel base 4'. 
Plows raised and lowered by hand or com- 
pressed air. 

Equipped with two K-14 controllers, rheo- 
stats and cable, one main reservoir, brake 
cylinder and brake valves, air cylinders and 
valves for operating plows. 
Price $1,000, F.O.B. Rensselaer, New York. 

Albany Southern R. R. Co. 

Rensselaer, N. Y. 



HAROLD R. WILSON MACHINERY CO. 

423 Pine Street, St. Louis Cars of All Kinds 

By Far the Best 2nd Hand Cars Ever Offered 




Will Alter to Salt— Overbanl and Repaint 

8 complete motor cars like above cut, in perfect condition; each 
42 feet 6 inches long; seat 50; 4 motors; complete equipment. 
Extremely low price to move quickly. Write for our new list. 

A C & D C UNITS-MOTORS-ROT ARIES-ENGINES-BOILERS 



FOR SALE 

Two Snow Plows: One Sprinkler: Cars, Motors, Ralls, 
Generators. Everything for Track, Rolling Stock, Power 
Plant bought and sold. Send us your requirements. 

Write for our Lists and Catalogs. 

Railway & Power Equipment Co. 

Charles F. Johnson P. O. Box 155 Ellicott Sq., Buffalo, N. Y. 



COMPLETE ARMATURES FOR SALE 

FOR ALL THE STANDARD 
STREET RAILWAY MOTORS 

GET OUR PRICE WE CAN SAVE YOU MONEY 

America'* Createsi Repair Works 

CLEVELAND ARMATURE WORKS, Cleveland, 0. 



If you are seeking new methods for 
your departrnent you need to read the 
Electric Railway Journal regularly. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



115 




150 K.W. Motor Generator Set 

1—220 H.P.. 3 phase. 60 cycle, 2080 volt. 514 R.P.M.. General Elec- 
tric induction motor, direct coupled to 150 K.W General Electric, 
550 Tolt. CLE, compound wound generator. Instant shipment. 

Booster Set 

Generator — West'gh'se 70 K.W., 350 volt. 200 amp. series wound. 
Motor— West'gh'se 105 H.P., 575 TOlt, 950 R.P.M.. type "SA" shunt 
wound. 

Complete with coupling and panel. 

60 Cycle, Rotary Converters 

2 — General Electric 1000 K.W., 600 v.. 360 H.P.M., type "HC," comp. 
wound. 6 phase. Complete with air cooled 2300 t. trans., react- 
ances and panel)?. 

2 — General Electric 500 K.W., 575 volt, 600 K.P.M., type "HC," comp. 
wound. 6 phase. Complete with air cooled trans., 2300 v. react- 
ance.s and panels. 



1 — 300 K.W. Westinghouse. 600 volt D.C., 370 rolt A.C.. 600 K.P.M. 

with oil cooled G.E. trans. II.UOO v. primary 
1 — 200 K.W. Westinghouse, 000 volt D.C.. 370 volt a.."'.. 720 R.P.M. 
Also following transformers ; 

3 — 125 K.W. G.E. 2400 volts prim., 370 volts sec. 
6 — 75 K.W. Ft. Wayne. 10.000-9000-185-370 v. 
3 — 175 K.W. Stanley. 10,000-2300 volts. 

25 Cycle, Rotary Converters 

1 — 500 K.W. General Electric, 3 phase, 25 cycle, 600 volt D.C.. 370 

volt A.C.. 375 R.P.M. 
2 — 300 K.W. Genl. Elect., 3 ph., 25 cycle, 750 R.P.M., 600 volts. 
1 — 250 K.W. Genl. Elect.. 3 ph., 25 cycle, 500 R.P.M.. 600 volts. 

Can also furnish transformers — ali voltages. 

Railway Car Equipment 

8 — West. 112 Motors, 75 H.P., newly rewound. 

5 — Type M. Single End Control for 4 motors. 75 H.P. ea. 

2 — K. 14 controllers. 



ARCHER & BALDWIN, 114 Liberty Street 



ROOM 302 
'Phone Rector 4337-433S-4339 
SEND FOR CATALOG— JUST OUT 
ENGINES— BOILERS— MOTORS— CONDENSERS— ETC. 



New York 



1 CARS 


FOR 


SALE 


OPEN and CLOSED 
MOTOR and TRAIL 




Write for P 


ice and Full Particulars to 


ELECTRIC 

Qmmon wealth BUo. 


EQUIPMENT CO. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



Try Journal " Positions Wanted " 
columns for high grade positions. 

Try Journal " Positions Vacant " 
columns for high grade assistants. 



POSITIONS WANTED 



( AR painter — A competent and thoroughly all 
around mechanic, best of references, good 
worker, efficient in handling men, or will 
work under good fireman, desirous of making 
change. Can give good recommendation from 
past and present employers. Box 678, Elec. 
. Ky. Jour. 

LECTRICAL engineer and superintendent, 
t technical graduate, with 15 years' practical 
Lexperience, engineering, construction and 
roperation; railway, lighting and power sys- 
|tems. Now with large company, desires 
tchange. Al references. Box 675, tlec. Ry. 
|Jour. 

CPERIENCED man wishes to change posi- 
r tion. Has qualified as general superintend- 
[ ent, superintendent, constructing and oper- 
■ ating engineer. Age 45, 24 years' experi- 
f ence. Identified with two very large and 
[ conspicuous engineering, constructing and 
f o[)erating developments. First — Hydro-elec- 
rtric, transmission, transformation and dis- 
; tribution, 8 years. Second — High tension, 
I transmission, transformation for large elec- 
[ trie railway, 6 years. Now holding a very 
[important position with one of the largest 
Mlluminating comi>anies. Specially qualified to 
I handle engineering, construction, mainte- 
1 nance, and operation of an extensive trans- 
t.mission and distribution system, either for 
[railway or lighting purposes. Very success- 
[ ful on organization, efficiency and economy. 

Sixteen years' record as a producer of re- 
[ suits. References, present and past employ- 
[ers. Box 656, Elec. Ry. Jour. 

RADUATE civil engineer. Experienced in 
ttrack, overhead, car equipment and building 
I construction, and maintenance drafting, esti- 
I mating, valuation, car schedules, and traffic 
[data. At present supt. track and overhead. 
JDesires change. Box 676, Elec. Ry. Jour. 

\N, 37, accustomed to handling material ac- 
I counts, job costs, payrolls, distribution 
[sheets, etc., wishes position with street or 
linterurban electric road. Address Box 673, 

Elec. Ry. Jour. 

MANAGER — General superintendent, purchas- 
ing agent. Position with medium sized rail- 
way or combined railway and light plant. 
Good practical experience in construction and 
operation. Good references. Box 663, Elec. 
Ry. Jour. 

MASTER mechanic open for immediate en- 
gagernent. Lone experience, reliable and un- 
questioned ability. Best references. Box 
671, Elec. Ry. Jour. 



POSITIONS WANTED 



POSITION wanted by young man with valuable 
electric railway experience embracing all 
activities of way department, together with 
valuation work. Investigations of traffic Con- 
ditions, service, and fare regulations, etc. 
Best of references. Box 664, Elec. Ry. Jour. 

PRACTICAL engineer, many years' experi- 
ence, seeks position as General Supt., supt. 
motive power or master mechanic; wide ex- 
perience all branches both mechanical and 
electrical from power house to track^ includ- 
ing operation; expert in car design and 
maintenance; best references. Box 662, 
Elec. Ry. Jour. 

STOREKEEPER^ thoroughij; acquainted with 
all electric railway material and accounts, 
desires change. Can cut the mustard in re- 
gard to efficiency and economy. Box 674, 
Elec. Ry. Jour. 

SUPERINTENDENT of equipment or master 
mechanic desires position. At present in 
charge of a first class road but desires to 
change. Have had 18 years' experience on 
city elevated and high speed interurljan. 
Good organizer and equipment manager, 
thoroughly up to date on all types of equip- 
ment. Best of references. Box 661, Elec. 
Ry. Jour. 

YOUNG man desires position as auditor of 

electric railway company. At present so 

employed. Best of references. Box 679, 
Elec. Ry. Jour. 



POSITIONS VACANT 



WANTED — A salesman who has had experi- 
ence in selling friction tape and insulating 
compounds. Address Box 677, Elec. Ry. 
Jour. 

WANTED — Bookkeeper, young man, to take 
charge of set of books of street railway 
company; must have had previous experi- 
ence and be able to furnish satisfactory 
references. Give both in application. Ad- 
dress Box 668, Elec. Ry. Jour. 

WANTED — Good experienced foreman _ on 
heavy catenary or trolley construction. 
Apply in person or by writing, giving ex- 
perience, to M. J. Griffith, Supt. Const., 
Gibbs & Hill Consulting Engrs., Bluefield, 
West Virginia. 



FOR SALE 



Chestnut Poles For Sale ' 

We furnish A, B, C and E grades in any 
length, 20' to 75' and stubbs, chestnut poles 
and R.R. ties, locust posts and hardwood 
lumber and timbers. A good stock of poles 
on hand. Can make prompt shipments. Ad- 
dress Lewis Lumber Co., Relief, N. C. 



For Sale 

Two Briggs 10-bench, single truck. Open Car 
Bodies, fitted with 2-motor cables and mount- 
ed on Peckham 9-A extension truck, 7.ft. 
wheel base, 33" wheel. One Jackson & 
Sharpe single truck Closed Car Body, length 
over corner posts 20 ft., longitudinal seats, 
fitted with 2-motor cables and mounted on 
Peckham 9-A extension truck, 7 ft. wheel 
base, 33" wheel. Above cars can be in- 
spected at Kennebunk, Maine. Atlantic 
Shore Railway. 



POLES AND PILING 



NEW CYPRESS. 



PRICES LOW. 




RAILS— EQUIPMENT— TANKS— ETC. 



Armature Coil Taping 
Machine 

Saves Time, Labor and Money 

A boy can tape 40 
coils for Westinghouse 
12A Armature in an 
hour. Further par- 
ticulars gladly fur- 
nished. 




Geo. M. Griswold Machine Ce. 

New Haven, Conn. 



116 



(Acetylene Service to Commutator Truing Devices) 



[February 6, 1915 



READY-REFERENCE INDEX 

to products manufactured by advertisers in this issue of Electric Railway Journal 



Over 300 different products are here listed. 

The Alphabetical Index (see eighth page following) 
gives the page number of each advertisement. 

As far as possible advertisements are so arranged 
that those relating to the same kind of equipment or 
apparatus will be found together. 



This ready-reference index is up to date, changes 
l)cing made each week. 

If you don't find listed in these pages any product 
of which you desire the name of the maker, write or 
wire Electric Railway Journal, and we will promptly 
furnish the information. 



Acetylene Service. 

Prest-O-Llte Co., Inc., The 

Advertising, Street Car. 
Collier, Barron G., Inc. 

Air Cleaner. 

Lorcl Manufacturing Co. 

Alloys and Bearing Metals. 
(See Bearings and Bearing 
Metals.) 

Alloys, Steel and Iron. 
American Vanadium Co. 

Amusement Devices. 
Este Co., The J. D. 

Anchors, Guy. 

Garton Co.. W. R. 
Johns-Manville Co.. H. W. 
Ohio Brass Co. 
Western Electric Co. 
Westinghouse Elec. & M. Co. 

Antl-Cllmbers. 
Railway Improvement Co. 

Automobiles and Buses. 
Brill Co., The J. G. 

Axle Stralghteners. 

Columbia. M. W. & M. I. Co. 

Axles — Car Wheel. 

Bemis Car Truck Co. 

Brill Co., The J. G. 

Cambria Steel Co, 

Carnegie Steel Co. 

Cincinnati Car Co. 

Hadfield's, Ltd. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co. 

National Tube Co. 

Niles Car & Mfg. Co. 

St. Louis Car Co. 

Standard Motor Truck Co. 

Standard Steel Works Co. 

Taylor Elec. Truck Co. 

Westinghouse Elec. & M. Co. 
Babbitting Devices. 

American Gen'l Eng'g Co. 

Columbia M. W. & M. I. Co. 

Badges and Buttons. 

American Railway Supply Co. 

International Register Co. 

Western Electric Co. 

Woodman Mfg. & Sup. Co., R. 
Bankers and Brokers. 

Coal & Iron National Bank. 

Halsey & Co., N. W. 
Batteries, Dry. 

Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 

Nungesser Carb. & Bat'ry Co. 

Protective Signal Mfg. Co. 

Stackpole Carbon Co. 

Western Electric Co. 
Batteries, Storage. 

Edison Storage Battery Co. 

Electric Storage Battery Co. 

Western Electric Co. 
Bearings and Bearing Metals. 

American General Engrg. Co. 

Columbia. M. W. & M. I. Co. 

General Electric Co. 

Long Co., E. G. 

More-Jones Brass & M. Co. 

Post & Co., E. L. 

St. Louis Car Co. 

Taylor Elec. Truck Co. 

Westinghouse Elec. & M. Co. 
Bearings, Center. 

Baldwin Loco. Works. 
Bearings, Ollless, Graphite, 

Bronze & Wooden. 

Graphite Lubricating Co. 
Bearings, Roller and Ball. 

Railway Roller Bearing Co. 

S K F Ball Bearing Co. 
Bells and Gongs. 

Brill Co., The J. O. 

Electric Service Supplies Co. 

National Tube Co. 

Protective Signal Mfg. Co. 

Relter, G. C. 

St. Louis Car Co. 

Trolley Supply Co. 

Western Electric Co. 
Belt Conveyori. 

Jeffrey Mfg. Co. 



Belting. 

Jeffrey Mfg. Co. 

Benders, Rail. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co. 
Watson-Stillman Co. 
Zelnicker Sup. Co., W. A. 

Blowers. 
General Electric Co. 
Westinghouse Elec. & M. Co. 

Blow Torches for Soldering and 
Brazing. 
Prest-O-Lite Co., Inc., The. 

Boilers. 
Babcock & Wilcox Co. 

Boiler Cleaning Compounds. 
Dearborn Chemical Co. 
Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 

Boiler Coverings. 
Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 

Boiler Tubes. 
National Tube Co. 

Bond Testers. 
American Steel & Wire Co. 
Lord Manufacturing Co. 

Bonding Apparatus. 
Prest-O-Lite Co., Inc., The. 

Bonding Tools. 
American Steel & Wire Co. 
Elec. Ry. Improvement Co. 
Elec. Service Supplies Co, 
Ohio Brass Co, 
Prest-O-Lite Co,, Inc, The, 

Bonds, Rail. 

American Steel & Wire Co, 

Elec, Ry. Improvement Co. 

Electric Service Supplies Co. 

Electric Ry, Equipment Co, 

Garton Co.. W, R, 

General Electric Co, 

Johns-Manville Co,, H, W, 

Lord Manufacturing Co, 

Ohio Brass Co. 

Western Electric Co, 

Westinghouse Elec, & M, Co, 
Book Publishers. 

McGraw-Hill Book Co., Inc, 
Boring Tools, Car Wheel. 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co. 
Braces, Rail. 

Kllby Frog & Switch Co. 

Weir Frog Co, 
Brackets and Cross Arms. (See 

also Poles, Ties, Posts, Etc.) 

American Bi-idge Co, 

Creaghead Engineering Co, 

Electric Ry, Equipment Co, 

Electric Service Supplies Co, 

Int'l Creosoting & Constr, Co. 

Ohio Brass Co. 

Lindsley Bros. Co. 

Western Electric Co. 
Brake Adjusters. 

Anderson Brake Adjuster Co. 

Sauvage-Ward Brake Co. 
Brake Shoes. 

Amer, Brake Shoe & Fdy, Co, 

Barbour-Stockwell Co, 

Brill Co., The J, G, 

Columbia M. W. & M, I, Co, 

Long Co,, E. G, 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg, Co, 

St, Louis Car Co, 

Taylor Elec, Truck Co, 

Wheel Truing Brake S, Co, 
Brakes, Brake Systems and 

Brake Parts. 

Allls-Chalmers Mfg. Co, 

Anderson Brake Adjuster Co. 

Brill Co., The J, G, 

Columbia M, W, & M, I, Co, 

General Electric Co, 

Jones' Sons Co,, J, M, 

Long Co., E, G, 

Lord Manufacturing Co, 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg, Co, 

National Brake Co, 

National Brake & Elec, Co. 

St. IjouIs Car Co, 

Taylor Elec, Truck Co. 

U. S, Metal & Mfg. Co. 

Westinghouse Trac. B. Co, 



Brazing and Welding Processes. 
Davis-Bournonviile Co. 
Electric Railway Improv. Co. 
Falk Co,, The, 
Goldschmidt-Thermit Co, 
Indianapolis Switch & Frog Co, 
Oxweld Acetylene Co, 
Prest-O-Lite Co,, Inc.. The, 
Westinghouse Elec, & M, Co, 

Bridges and Buildings. 
American Bridge Co, 
Brown Hoisting Mach. Co. 

Brooms, Track, Steel or Rattan. 
Paxson Co,, J, W. 
Western Electric Co, 
Zelnicker Sup, Co,, W, A. 

Brushes, Carbon. 

Dixon Crucible Co., Jos, 
General Electric Co. 
Jeandron. W. J. 
Morgan Crucible Co, 
Nungesser Carb, & Bat'ry Co, 
Speer Carbon Co, 
Stackpole Carbon Co, 
Western Elec, Co, 
Westinghouse Elec. & M. Co, 

Bumpers, Car Seat. 

Elastic Tip Co, 
Elec, Service Supplies Co, 
Imperial Ruliber Co, 
Massachusetts Chemical Co, 
Walpole Tire & Rubber Co, 

Bunkers, Coal. 

American Bridge Co, 

Brown Hoisting Machinery Co, 

Bunting. 

Boyle & Co,, Inc, John, 
Bushings, Fibre. 

Diamond State Fibre Co, 
Bushings, Graphite and Wooden. 

Graphite Lubricating Co. 
Bushings, Rubber. 

Imperial Rubber Co, 
Buttons. (See Badges and 

Buttons.) 
Cables. (See Wires and Cables.) 
Carbon Brushes. (See Brushes, 

Carbon.) 
Car Equipment. (For Fenders, 

Heaters, Registers, Wheels, 

etc. — see thoses headings.) 
Car Trimmings. (For Curtains, 

Registers, Doors, Seats, etc. — 

See those headings.) 
Cars, Passenger, Freight, Ex- 
press, etc. 

American Car Co, 

Brill Co,, The J. G, 

Cambria Steel Co. 

Cincinnati Car Co. 

Jewett Car Co. 

.Tones' Sons Co., J. M, 

Kuhlman Car Co,. G. C, 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co. 

Nile.s Car & Mfg. Co. 

St, Louis Car Co. 

Southern Car Co, 

United Electric Car Co. 

Wason Mfg, Co, 
Cars, Prepayment. 

Prepayment Car Sales Co, 
Cars, Self-Propelled. 

Electric Storage Battery Co. 

General Electric Co, 
Castings, Composition of Cop- 
per. 

Anderson M. Co., A. & J. M, 
Castings, Gray Iron and Steel. 

Amer, Brake Shoe & Fdry, Co 

American Bridge Co, 

American Gen'l Eng'g Co. 

Bemis Car Truck Co. 

Columbia M. W, & M, I, Co. 

Falk Co.. The. 

Hadfield's, Ltd. 

Jeffrey Mfg. Co. 

Jones' Son Co., J. M, 

Long Co,, E, G, 

St Louis Car Co, 

St, Louis Steel Foundry, 

Standard Steel Works Co, 

Union Spring & Mfg. Co. 



Castings, Malleable and Brass. 
Amer, Brake Shoe & Fdry. Co. 
American Gen'l Eng'g Co. 
Bemis Car Truck Co. 
Hadfield's, Ltd. 
Jeffrey Mfg. Co. 
Long Co., E, G, 
St, Louis Car Co, 

Catchers and Retrievers, Trol- 

ley. 

Eclipse Railway Supply Co. 

Elec. Service Supplies Co. 

Long Co., E, G. 

Lord Manufacturing Co. 

New Haven Trolley Sup. Co. 

Trolley Supply Co. 

Wasson Engr'g & S, Co, 

Wood Co,, Chas, N. 
Ceiling, Car. 

Keyes Products Co, 

Pantasote Co, 
Checks, Employees'. 

American Ry. Supply Co, 
Chemists. 

Little, Arthur D,, Inc, 
Cheese Cloth. 

Boyle & Co., Inc., John, 
Circuit Breakers. 

Cutter Electrical & Mfg, Co, 

Garton Co,, W, R, 

General Electric Co, 

Western Electric Co. 

Westinghouse Elec, & M, Co, 
Clamps and Connectors for 

Wires and Cables. 

American Gen'l Eng'g Co, 

Anderson M, Co,, A. & J, M, 

Elec. Engrs, Equipment Co, 

Elec. Service Supplies Co, 

General Electric Co. 

Klein & Sons. Mathias, 

Ohio Brass Co, 

Western Electric Co, 

Westingiiouse Elec, & M, Co. 
Cleaners and Scrapers, Track, 

(See also Snow-Plows, Sweep- 
ers and Brooms.) 

Brill Co,, The J. G, 

Cincinnati Car Co. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg, 

Ohio Brass Co. 

Van Dorn & Dutton Co, 

Western Electric Co, 
Cleats, Car Wiring. 

General Electric Co, 
Clusters and Sockets. 

General Electric Co. 
Coal and Ash Handling, 

Conveying and Hoisting 

chlnery.) 
Coasting Clocks. 

Railway Improvement Co. 
Coll Banding and Winding Ma 

chines. 

American Gen'l Eng'g Co 

Columbia M. W, & M. I. Co. 

Electric Service Supplies Co. 

Garton Co,, W, R, 

Western Electric Co. 
Colls, Armature & Field. 

Cleveland .\rmature vC'orks 

Columbia M. W. & M. I, Coi 

D & W Fuse Co. 

Electric Operations Co. 

General Electric Co. 

Mica Insulator Co. 

Westinghouse Elec, * M, C 
Colls, Choke & Kicking. 

Electric Service Supplies Co. 

General EJiectric Co, 

Lord Manufacturing Co, 

Westinghouse Elec, & M, Co. 
Coin Carriers. 

Etter, Chas, F. 
Coin-Counting Machines. 

International Register Co. 

.iohnson Fai-e Box Co. 
Commutator Slotters. 

.American General Eng'g Co, 

Gener.ai Electric Co. 

Westinghouse Elec. & M, Co, 

Wood Co,. Chas. N. 
Commutator Truing Devices. 

American General Eng'g Co, 

General Electric Co. 



Cm 



(See 
Ma. 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



117 




"He Done Witch 
Himself" 



is the verdict of a post-mortem 
in Middle Congo when the 
cause of death is unknown. 

Every race has a stock 
phrase to throw aside any sub- 
ject which it cannot master. 

Just as shop men will explain 
away some unknown motor 
trouble by the old reliable "It's 
cranky," when as a matter of 
fact the poor machine is throw- 
ing out symptoms of improper 
brush application. 

That is why we insist that 
brushes should be prescribed 
for you, not merely sold to you. 

In our organization brush 
engineering is inseparable from 
brush selling. 

But it is up to us to prescribe 
the Morganite brushes you 
need — that's good commuta- 
tion insurance. 




Factory, Brooklyn 

AGENTS: 

Lewis & Roth Co., 312 Denckla Bldg., Philadelphia 



389 



Electrical Engineering & Mfg. Co. 
First National Banlc Bldg., Pittsburgh 



The Highest Development 

In Very Small Indicating Instruments 
for Direct Current 

is marked by the 




>fODET. 280, SinRle 

RanKe Portable 

Voltmeter 

(One-quarter Size.) 



Miniature 

Precision Instruments 

PORTABLE 

Volt-Meters, Mtlli voltmeters. 

Volt- Am meters. Ammeters, 

Mil- Ammeters 

are supplied in single, double and 
triple rauEes. the Triple Rauffe 
Volt-Ammeter comprising six In- 
struments In one. This group also 
includes BATTERY TESTERS. 

SWITCHBOARD 

Voltmeters, Volt-Amme- 
ters, Ammeters, Mil- 
Ammeters 

This new line of instruments rep- 
resents the finest development of 
small size pivoted moving coil, 
permanent magnet type of in- 
struments. 

They embody characteristics which 
have made the well-known Wes- 
ton Standard famous throughout 
the world. They are accurate. 

dead boat and extremely sensitive. 

They may be left continuously in circuit at full load and are 

shielded against external electrical and magnetic influences. 

They are substantially constructed and have the longest scale 

ever provided In Instruments of similar size. 

The prices are surprisingly low for Instruments of such quality. 

The seveiiil models and ranges offer a selection from over 300 

different combinations. They are listed in BULLETIN NO. 8. 

WHICH WILL BE MAILED UPON REQUEST. 

Weston Electrical Instrument Co., Newark, N* J. 




MODBL. 267, Switch 
board Ammeter. 

(One-quarter Size.) 



New York St. Louis Detroit 

Chicago Denver Cleveland 

Philadelphia Wan Francisco Buffalo 

Boston Atlanta 



Richmond Winnipeg 
Toronto Vancouver 

Montreal Berlin 

London 



50,000 is the answer 




ANTI-PLUVIUS 

(Trade Mark) 

Puttyless Skylights 



Patented 



About 50,000 square 
feet of "Anti-Plu- 
vius" Puttyless Sky- 
lights are a feature of 
the Harvard Road 
Shops of the Cleve- 
land City Railway. 
You can investigate 
them there or send 
for our catalog. 



The G. Drouv^ Co. E^^^SS^^, 



118 



(Commutators or Parts to Hose, Pneumatic and Fire) 



[February 6, 1915 



READY-REFERENCE INDEX 

to products manufactured by advertisers in this issue of Electric Railway Journal 



Commutators or Parts., 
American General Eng'g Co. 
Cameron Electrical Mfg. Co. 
Cleveland Armature Works. 
Columbia M. W. & M. I. Co. 
Garton Co., W. R. 
General Electric Co. 
Long Co., E. G. 
Mica Insulator Co. 
Western Electric Co. 
Westinghouse Elec. & M. Co. 

Compressors, Air, 

AUis-Chalmers Mfg. Co. 

Curtis & Co. Mfg. Co. 

General Electric Co. 

National Brake & Elec. Co. 

Westinghouse Trac. B. Co. 
Condensers. 

AUis-Chalmers Mfg. Co. 

General Electric Co. 

Westinghouse Machine Co. 
Conduits. 

Fibre Conduit Co. 

Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 

Standard Underground Cable 
Co. 

Western Electric Co. 
Conduits, Flexible. 

Tubular Woven Fabric Co. 
Controller Regulators. 

Electric Service Supplies Co. 

Lord Manufacturing Co. 
Controllers or Parts. 

Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co. 

American General Eng'g Co. 

Columbia M. W. & M. I. Co. 

Electric Service Supplies Co. 

General Electric Co. 

Johns-Manville Co.. H. W. 

Lord Manufacturing Co. 

Kerschner Co., Inc., W. R. 

Westinghouse Elec. & M. Co. 
Controlling Systems. 

General Electric Co. 

Westinghouse Elec. & M. Co. 
Converters, Rotary. 

Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co. 

General Electric Co. 

Western Electric Co. 

Westinghouse Elec. & M. Co. 
Conveying and Hoisting Ma- 
chinery. 

American Bridge Co. 

Brown Hoisting Machy. Co. 

Green Bng. Co. 

Hadfield's, Ltd. 

Jeffrey Mfg. Co. 
Cord, Bell, Trolley, Register, etc. 

Brill Co.. The J. G. 

Electric Service Supplies Co. 

Garton Co., W. R, 

Imperial Rubber Co. 

International Register Co. 

Long Co., E., G. 

Lord Manufacturing Cof V 

Roebling's Sonfe Co.. J6hn A. 

Samson Cordage Works. 
Cord Connectors &, Couplers. 

Electric Service Supplies Co. 

Samson Cordage Works. 

Wood Co., Chas. N. 
Cotton Duck. 

Hoyle & Co., Inc., John. 
Couplers, Car. 

Brill Co , The J. G. 

Cincinnati Car Co. 

Long Co., E. G. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co. 

Ohio Brass Co. 

Westinghouse Trac. B. Co. 
Cranes. (See also Hoists.) 

Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co. 

Brown Hoisting Mchy. Co. 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co. 

Thew Automatic Shovel Co. 
Creosotlng. (See Wood Pre- 

servatlves.) 
Cross Arms. (Sec Brackets.) 
Crossing Foundations. 

International .Sttel 'J'ie Co. 

Crossing Signals. (See Signals, 

Crossing.) 
Crossings, Track. See Track 

Special Work.) 
Crushers and Pulverizers. 

Jeffrey M'tr Ct 
Culverts. 

American Rolling Mill Co. 

Atlas Metal Works. 

Bark River B. & Culvert Co. 

California Corr. Culvert Co. 

Canton Culvert & Silo Co. 

Coast Culvert & Flume Co. 

Corrugated Culvert Co. 



Delaware Metal Culvert Co. 
Dixie Culvert & Metal Co. 
Hardesty Mfg. Co., R. 
Illinois Corrugated Metal Co. 
Independence Cor. Culvert Co. 
Iowa Pure Iron Culvert Co. 
Kentucky. Culvert Co. 
Lee-Arnett Co. 
Ijone Star Culvert Co. 
Lyle Corrugated Culvert Co. 
Michigan Bridge & Pipe Co. 
Montana Culvert Co. 
Nebraska Culvert & Mfg. Co. 
Nevada Metal Mfg. Co. 
New England Metal Cul. Co. 
North East Metal Cul. Co. 
Northwestern Sheet & I. Wks. 
O'Neall Co., W., Q. 
Ohio Corrugated • Culvert Co. 
Pennsylvania Metal Cul. Co. 
Koad Supply & Metal Co. 
Sioux Falls Metal Culvert Co. 
Spencer, J. N. 
Spokane Corr. Cul. Co. 
Tennessee Metal Culvert Co. 
Utah Corr. Culvert & Flume 

Co. 
Virginia Metal & Culvert Co. 
Western Metal Mfg. Co. 

Curtains and Curtain Fixtures. 
Brill Co., The J. G. 
Curtain Supply Co. 
Dupont Fabrikoid Co. 
Edwards Co.. Inc., The O. M. 
Electric Service Supplies Co. 
Pantasote Co. 

Railway Supply & Curtain Co. 
St. Louis Car Co. 

Cushions, Field Coll. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co. 

Walpole Tile & Rubber Co. 
Cutting Processes. 

Prest-O-Lite Co.. Inc., The. 
Derailing Devices. (See also 
Track Work.) 

Cleveland Frog & Cross. Co. 

U. S. Metal & Mfg. Co. 
Despatching Systems. 

Northey-Simmen Sig. Co. 

Simmen Automatic Ry. SIg. 
Co. 

Western Electric Co. 

Detective Service. 

Drummond's Detective Ag'y. 

Wisch Service, P.' Edward. 
Disinfectants. 

Gardner & Co. 
Door Operating Devices. 

Electric Service Supplies Co. 

Prepayment Car Sales Co. 
Doors and Door Fixtures. 

Brill Co., The J. G. 

Edwards Co., Inc., The O. M. 

General Electric Co. 

Electric Service Supplies Co. 

Hale & Kilburn Co. 
Doors,- Asbestos. 

Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 
Doors, Folding Vestibule. 

Electric Service Supplies Co. 

Prepayment Car Sales Co. 
Doors, Steel Rolling. 

Kinnear Mfg. Co. 
Doors, Trap. 

Edwards Co., Inc., The O. M. 
Draft, Rigging. (See Couplers.) 
Drills, Track. 

American Steel & Wire Co. 

Elec. Service Supplies Co. 

Long Co.. E. G. 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co. 

Ohio Brass Co. 
Dryers and Purifiers, Oil. (See 

Purifiers and Dryers. Oil.) 
Dryers, Sand. 

Zelnicker Sup. Co., W. A. 
Engineers, Consulting, Contract- 
ing and Operating. 

Archbold-Brady Co. 

Arnold Co. 

Burch. Edw. P. 

Bylleshy & Co.. H. M. 

Ford, Bacon & Davis. 

Grelms Corpor.ation. H. E. 

Gulick-Henderson Co. 

Herrlck, Albert B. 

Hovey, M. H. 

Hunt & Co., Robert W. 

.lackson, D C. <Sr Wm. B, 

Little. Arthur D., Inc. 

Neller. Rich & Co. 

Richey, A. S. 

Roosevelt & Thompson. 

Sanderson & Porter. 

Sargent & Lundy. 



Scofield Engineering Co. 
Stone & Webster Eng. Corp. 
White & Co., J. G. 
Woodmansee & Davidson, Inc. 

Engines, Gas and Oil. 
Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co. 
Westinghouse Machine Co. 

Engines, Steam.* 
Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co. 
W^estinghouse Machine Co. 

Fare Boxes 
American General Eng'g Co. 
Brill Co., The J. G. 
Cleveland Fare Box Co. 
Dayton Fare Recorder Co. 
International Register Co. 
Johnson Fare Box Co. 

Fences and Fence Posts. 

American Steel & Wire Co. 

Fencing Wire. 

American Steel & Wire Co. 

Fenders and Wheel Guards. 
Brill Co., The J. G. 
Cincinnati Car Co. 
Cleveland Fare Box -Co. 
Consolidated Car Fender Co. 
Eclipse Railway Supply Co- 
Electric Service Supplies Co. 
Fonger Fender Co. 
Lord Manufacturing Co. 
McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co. 
Parmenter. F. & W. G. Co. 
Star Brass Works. 
Western Electric Co. 

Fibre. 
Amer. Vulcanized Fibre Co. 
Diamond State Fibre Co. 
Westinghouse Elec. & M. Co. 

Fibre Tubing. 
Diamond State Fibre Co. 
Fibre Conduit Co. 
Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 

Field Colls. (See Coils.) 

Fire Extinguishing Apparatus. 

Electric Operations Co. 

Imperial Rubber Co. 

Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 

Pyrene Mfg. Co. 
FIreproofing Materials. 

Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 
Flooring Composition. 

Amer. Mason Safety Tread Co. 

Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 

Western Electric Co. 
Forging & Punching Machinery. 

Bliss Co., K. W. 
Forglngs. 

Bliss Co., E. W. 

Standard Motor Truck Co. 

Standard Steel Works Co. 
Frogs, Track. (See Track Work.) 
Furnaces. (See Stokers.) 
Fuses and Fuse Boxes. 

American General Eng'g Co. 

Columbia M. W. & M. I. Co. 

D & W Fuse Co. 

General Electric Co. 

Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 

Lord Manufacturing Co. 

Western Electric Co. 

Westinghouse Elec. & M. Co. 
Fuses, Refillable. 

Columbia M. \V. & M. 1. Co. 

Economy Fuse Mfg. Co. 

Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 
Gaskets. 

Diamond State Fibre Co. 

Imperi.ii Rubber Co. 

Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 

Power Specialty Co. 
Gas Producers. 

Westinghouse Machine Co. 
Gates, Car. 

Brill Co., The J. G. 

Cincinnati Car Co. 

Jewett Car Co. 
Gauges, Oil and Water. 

Ohio Brass Co. 
Gear Blanks. 

Carnegie Steel Co. 

Diamond State Fibre Co. 

Standard Steel Works Co. 
Gear Cases. 

Bemis Car Truck Co. 

Columbia M. W. & M. I. Co. 

Electric .Service Supplies Co. 

Jeffrey Mfg. Co. 

Kerschner t^o.. Inc., W. R. 

Thayer & Co., Inc. 

Westinghouse Elec. & M. Co. 



Gears and Pinions. 

American Gen'l Eng'g Co. 
Amer. Vulcanized tibre Co. 
Bemis Car Truck Co. : 

Bliss Co., E. W. , 

Columbia M. W. & M. I. Co. 
Diamond State Fibre Co. 
Elec. Service Supplies Co. 
Garton Co., W. R. 
General Electric Co. 
Hadfield's, Ltd. 
Kerschner Co., Inc., W. R. 
Long Co., E. G. 
Nuttall Co., R. D. 
Tool Steel Gear & Pinion Co. 
Van Dorn & Dutton Co. 

Generators, Alternating Current. 

AUis-Chalmers Mfg. Co. 
General Electric So. 
National Brake & Electric Co. 
Western Electric Co. 
Westinghouse Elec. & M. Co. 

Generators, Direct Current. 

Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co. 

Dick, Kerr & Co. 

General Electric Co. 

Jeffrey Mfg. Co. 

National Brake & Electric Co. 

Western Electric Co. 

Westinghouse Elec. & M. Co. 

Gongs. (See Bells and Gongs.) 

Gongs, Rotary Foot. 

Reiter, G. C. 

Graphite. 
Dixon Crucible Co.. Joseph. 
Morgan Crucible Co. 

Greases. (See Lubricants.) 

Grinders and Grinding Wheels. 

Hadfield's, Ltd. 

Railway 'Track-work Co. 

U. S. Metal & Mfg. Co. 

Western Electric Co. 
Grinders, Portable, Electric. 

Railway Track-work Co. 

U. S. Metal & Mfg. Co. 

Western Elec. Co. 
Grounds. 

Lord Manufacturing Co. 
Guards, Cattle. 

American Bridge Co. 
Guards, Trolley. 

Electric Service Supplies Co 

Lord Manufacturing Co. 

Ohio Brass Co. 
Harps, Trolley. 

American Gen'l Eng'g Co. 

Anderson M. Co., A. & .1. M. 

Bayonet Trolley Harp Co. 

Elec. Service Supplies Co. 

Garton Co., W. R. 

Hensley Trolley & Mfg. Co. 

More-Jones Brass & Metal Co. 

Nuttall Co., R. D. 

Star Brass Works. 

Univers.il Trolley Wheel Co. 

AVcstern Electric Co. 
Headlights. 

Electric Service Supplies > - 

Garton Co., W. R. 

General Electric Co. 

Jones' Sons Co., J. M. 

Long Co., E. G. 

Ohio Brass Co. 

St. Louis Car Co. 

Trolley Supply Co. 

Westinghouse Elec. & M. ' 
Headlining. 

Keyes Products Co. 

Pantasote Co. 
Heaters, Car (Electric). 

Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 
Heaters, Car, Hot Air. 

Cooper Heater Co. 

Smith Heater Co.. Peter. 
Heaters, Car, Hot Water. 

Cooper Heater Co. 

Smilli Heater Co., Peter. 
Heaters, Car, Stove. 

Electric Service Supplies 0^ 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co. 
Hoists and Lifts. 

Curtis & Co. Mfg. Co. 

Duff Mfg. Co. 

Ford. Chain Block & Mfg. C%| 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co. 

Van Dorn & Dutton Co. 
Hose Bridges. 

Ohio BnisH Co. 
Hose, Pneumatic & Fire. 

Imj>erial Kubl>er Co. 

.Tohns-Manville Co., H. V 

NIchols-Lintern Co. 



FebrIjary 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



119 




Artnalac is Permanently 
Plastic — Never Hardens 
nor Crumbles — 

— Write for Data. 



High Speeds and 

High Temperatures 

Can't Force 

ARMALAC 

Out of an Armature 



Once an armature winding has been thoroughly 
treated with Armalac, the highest operating tem- 
peratures — the greatest speeds — the most severe 
expansion and contraction strains — cannot force it 
out of armature. Armalac is permanently mois- 
ture-])roof — a permanently efficient insulator — a 
permanent guard against costly "shorts" and shut- 
downs. 



©ofpofeTlre ^Ihxttcr Cb. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co.'s Products 

Walpole, Mass. 
Pioneers in Insulation Engineering 



VTA 1 /< ,^ Adjustable ^^^ 

IN (J. 14 0f^ ^-^z^ igM 

with the new auxiliary ^VBS^^^I 
foot — adjustable without ^fl^l^^^l 
tools — is preeminently ^«^^^l 
THE SPEED JACK (aP"* 
FOR EM ERGENC Y ^ f " 
Write for full details in ^B^^ 
the Buckeye Catalog. ^^HH 
Get your copy now. ^I^Hl 

The Buckeye Jack ^^j^^HI 


r 

1 


^J 71388 




GAR SEAT BUMPERS 

VARIOUS SHAPES 

Elastic Tip Co. 

370 Atlantic Ave. 
BOSTON, MASS. 




Samson Bell and Register Cord 

Solid braided cotton, extra quality. All sizes and colors. 
More durable, more economical and better looking than 
leather or rawhide. Send for samples and full information. 
SAMSON CORDAGE WORKS BOSTON. MASS. 2 




The OSCILLATOR makes 

Your Highway Crossing 
Signals Infallible 

It's simple — trouble-proo f — automatic — positive 
— inexpensive. Requires no track circuits or 
bonding. Costs little to install — practically noth- 
ing to maintain. Write for details. 



The Protective Signal Mfg. Co. 

Denver. Colorado 

-WILLIAM R. GARTOJf, 

General Sales Managrer, 

290 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

W. R. Garton Co., 1117 So. Desplaines St., 
Chicago. The Allen General Supplies, Ltd., 205 
Yonge St.. Toronto. John S. Black Co., 908 
Hennen Bldg., New Orleans. Benton C. "' 
7184 Kansas City, Mo. 




120 



(Hydraulic Machinery to Sash Fixtures, Car) 



[February 6, 1915 



READY-REFERENCE INDEX 

to products manufactured by advertisers in this issue of Electric Railway Journal 



Hydraulic Machinery. 
Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co. 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co. 
Watson-Stillman Co. 

Hydrogrounds. 
Brach Supply Co., L. S. 
Lord Mfg. Co. 

Impregnating Apparatus. (See 
Vacuum Drying Apparatus.) 

Inspection. 
Hunt & Co., Robt. W. 

Instruments, Measuring, Testing 
and Recording. 
General Electric Co. 
Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 
Western Electric Co. 
Westinghouse Elec. & Mfg. Co. 
Weston Elec'l Instrument Co. 

Insulating Cloth, Paper and 
Tape. 

Anchor Webbing Co. 
Diamond State Fibre Co. 
Garton Co., W. R. 
General Electric Co. 
Hope Webbing Co. 
Imperial Rubber Co. 
Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 
Lord Manufacturing Co. 
Massachusetts Chemical Co. 
Mica Insulator Co. 
Okonite Co., The. 
Sherwin-Williams Co. 
Standard Paint Co. 
Walpole Tire & Rubber Co. 
Western Electric Co. 
Westinghouse Elec. & M. Co. 

Insulations. (See also Paints.) 

Anderson M. Co., A. & J. M. 

Diamond State Fibre Co. 

Electric Service Supplies Co. 

Garton Co., W. R. 

General Electric Co. 

Imperial Rubber Co. 

Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co. 

Okonite Co., The. 

Sherwin-Williams Co. 

Standard Varnish Works. 

Sterling Varnish Co. 

Walpole Tire & Rubber Co. 

Western Electric Co. 

Westinghouse Elec. & M. Co. 
Insulators, Including 3d-Rall. 
(See Line Material.) 

Anderson M. Co., A. & J. M. 

Creaghead Engineering Co. 

Electric Ry. Equipment Co. 

Electric Service Supplies Co. 

Garton Co., W. R. 

General Electric Co. 

Hemingray Glass Co. 

.Tohns-ManvlUe Co., H. W. 

Macallen Co., The. 

Newark Engrg. Mfg. Co. 

Ohio Brass Co. 

Western Electric Co. 

Westinghouse Elec. & M. Co. 

White Co.. T. C. 
Insurance, Fire. 

Marsh & McLennan. 
Inventions Developed and Per- 

fected. 

Peters & Co.. G. D. 
Jack Boxes. (See also Tele- 
phone Apparatus and Parts.) 

Electric Service Supplies Co. 

Western Electric Co. 
Jacks. (See also Cranes, Hoists 
and Lifts.) 

American Gen'l Eng'g Co. 

Brill Co., The J. G. 

Buckeye Jack Mfg. Co. 

Columbia M. Wks. & M. I. Co. 

Duff Manufacturing Co. 

Watson-Stlllman Co. 
Joints, Rail. 

Carnegie Steel Co. 

Falk Co. 

Hadfleld's, Ltd. 

Rail Joint Co. 

Track Specialties Co. 

Zelnicker Supply Co., W. A. 
Journal Boxes. 

Bemis Car Truck Co. 

Brill Co., The J. G. 

Long Co., E. G. 

McCfulre-CummlngB Mfg. Co. 

Railway Roller Bearing Co. 

S K F Ball Bearing Co. 

Junction Boxes. 

Standard Underground Cable 
Co. 
Laboratory. 

Little. Arthur D., Inc. 



Lamp Guards and Fixtures. 
Anderson M. Co., A. & J. M. 
Electric Service Supplies Co. 
General Electric Co. 
Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 
Westinghouse Elec. & Mfg. Co. 

Lamps, Arc and Incandescent. 
(See also Headlights.) 
Anderson M. Co.. A. & J. M. 
General Electric Co. 
Lord Manufacturing Co. 
Western Electric Co. 
Westinghouse Elec. & M. Co 
Westinghouse Lamp Co. 

Lamps, Signal and Marker. 
Nichols-Lintem Co. 
Ohio Brass Co. 

Lathes, Car Wheel. 

Niles-Bement-Pond Co. 
Lifters, Car Step. 

Consolidated (Jar Fender Co. 
Lightning Protection. 

Anderson M. Co., A. & J. M. 

Brach Supply Co., L. S. 

Electric Service Supplies Co. 

Garton Co., W. R. 

General Electric Co. 

Lord Mfg. Co. 

Newark Engrg. Mfg. Co. 

Ohio Brass Co. 

Western Electric Co. 

Westinghouse Elec. & M. Co. 
Line Material, (See also Brack- 
ets, Insulators, Wires, etc.) 

American Gen'l Eng'g Co. 

Anderson M. Co., A. & J. M 

Archbold-Brady Co. 

Creaghead Engineering Co. 

Diamond State Fibre Co. 

Dick. Kerr & Co. 

Elec'l Engrs. Equipment Co. 

Electric Ry. Equipment Co. 

Electric Service Supplies Co 

Garton Co., W. R. 

General Electric Co. 

Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 

Macallen Co. 

Newark Engrg. Mfg. Co. 

Ohio Brass Co. 

Western Elec. Co. 

Westinghouse Elec. & M. Co. 

White Co., T. C. 
Lock Nuts. (See Nuts.) 
Lockers. Metal. 

rCdwards Co., Inc.. The O. M 
Locomotives, Electric. 

Halrlwin Locomotive Works. 

ISrill Co.. The J. G. 

General Electric Co. 

Internal Combustion Co. 

Jeffrey Mfg. Co. 

Jones' Sons Co., J. M. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co. 

Westinghouse Elec. & M. Co. 
Lubricants. Oil iS. Grease. 

Borne, Scrymser Co. 

Dearborn Chemical Co. 

Dixon Crucible Co., Jos. 

Galena-Signal Oil Co. 

Universal Lubricating Co. 
Lubricating Engineers. 

Galena .Signal Oil Co. 
Lumber. (See Poles, Ties, etc.) 

Machine Tools, 
Niles-Bement-Pond Co. 
Watson-Stillman Co. 

Mats. 

Imperial Rubber Co. 

Johns-Manville Co.. H. W. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co 

Walpole Tire & Rubber Co 
Meters. (See Instruments.) 

Mica. 

Long Co., E. G. 

Macallen Co. 

Mica Insulator Co. 
Motormen's Seats. 

Klec. Service Supplies Co. 

Wood Co., Chas. N. 
Motors, Electric. 

Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co. 

Dick, Kerr & Co, 

General Electric Co, 

National Brake & Elec. Co. 

Western Electric Co. 

Westinghouse Elec. & M. Co. 

Nuts and Bolts. 

Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co. 

Barbour-Stockwell Co. 

Long Co., E. G. 

Standard Motor Truck Co. 

U. S. Metal & Mfg. Co. 
Oils, (See Lubricants.) 



Oscillators, Signal. 

Protective Signal Mfg. Co. 
Ozonators. 

General Electric Co. 

Westinghouse Elec. & Mfg. Co. 

Packing. 

Diamond State Ii^bre Co. 

Electric Service Supplies Co. 

Garton Co., W. R. 

Imperial Rubber Co. 

Jobns-Manville Co., H. W. 

Post & Co., E. L. 

Power Specialty Co. 
Padlocks. 

Edwards Co., Inc., The O. M. 
Paints and Varnishes. (Insulat- 
ing.) 

General Electric Co. 

Imperial Rubber <Jo. 

Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 

Long Co., E. G. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co. 

Mica Insulator Co. 

Sherwin-Williams Co. 

Standard Paint Co. 

Standard Varnish Works. 

Sterling Varnish Co. 

Walpole Tire & Rubber Co. 
Paints and Varnishes. (Pre- 
servative.) 

Dixon Crucible Co., Jos. 

Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 

Long Co., E. G. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co. 

Sherwin-Williams Co. 

Standard Paint Co. 

Sterling Varnish Co. 

Walpole Tire & Rubber Co. 
Paints and Varnishes for Wood- 
work. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co. 

Sl'i-erwin-Williams Co. 

Wiilpole Tire & Rubber Co. 
Park Attractions. 

Este Co., The J. D. 
Paving Material. 

Am. Brake Shoe & Fdy. Co. 

Barrett Mfg. Co. 

International Creo. & Con. Co. 

U. S. Metal & Mfg. Co. 
Paving Pitch. 

Barrett Mfg. Co. 
Pickups, Trolley Wire. 

Electric Sei'vice Supplies Co. 

Ohio Brass Co. 
Pinion Pullers. 

American General Eng. Co. 

Columbia Mach. Wks. & M. I. 
Co. 

General Electric Co. 

Wood Co., Chas, N. 
Pinions, (See Gears.) 
Pins, Wood & Iron, 

Elec. Service Supplies Co. 

National Tube Co, 

Ohio Brass Co, 
Pipe. 

.\ationaI Tube Co. 
Pice Fittings. 

National Tube Co. 

Power Specialty Co. 

Standard Steel Works Co. 

Wat.son-Stillnian Co. 
Planers. (See Machine Tools.) 
Platforms, Extension, Car. 

Edwards Co., Inc., The O. M. 
Poles, Metal Street, 

Electric Ry. Equipment Co. 

Garton Co., W, R. 

National Tube Co. 

Poles, Ties, Posts, Piling and 
Lumber. 

Garton Co.. W, R, 

International Creo. & Con. Co. 

I..indsley Bros. Co. 

Page & Hill Co. 

Valentine-Clark Co. 

Western Electric Co, 
Poles and Ties, Treated. 

International Creo, & Con. Co. 

Lindslev Bi-os. Co. 

Page & Hill Co. 

^■alentine-ClaI•k Co, 

^\'estern Electric Co, 
Poles, Trolley. 

Anderson M. Co,. A, & J, M 

Bayonet Trolley Harp Co. 

Columbia M. W. & M. I. Co. 

Elec, Service Supplies Co. 

Garton Co,. W, R. 

Long Co,, E, O. 

Lord Manufacturing Co. 

National Tube Co. 

Nuttall Co., R. D, 



Potheads. 

Okonite Co., The. 
Pressure Regulators. 

General Electric Co. 

Ohio Brass Co. 
Pumps. 

Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co, 

Watson-Stillman Co. 
Punches, Ticket. 

.^m. Itailway Supply Co. 

Bonney-Vehslage Tool Co. 

International Register Co, 

Lord Manufacturing Co. 

Stowe Railway Punch Co. 

Wood Co,, Chas. N, 

Woodman Mfg, & Sup. Co., R. 
Punching Machinery. 

Watson-Stillman Co. 
Rail Grinders. (See Grinders.) 
Rail Welding. (See Brazing and 

Welding Processes.) 
Ralls, New. 

Cambria Steel Co. 
Rails, Relaying. 

Zelnicker Supply Co., W. A. 
Rattan. 

Brill Co.. The J. G. 

Electric Service Supplies Co. 

Hale & Kilburn Co. 

Jewett Car Co. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg, Co. 

St. Louis Car Co. 
Registers and Fittings. 

Brill Co., J. G. 

Cincinnati Car Co. 

Dayton Fare Recorder Co. 

Electric Service Supplies Co. 

International Register Co. 

Long Co., E, G, 

New Haven Trolley Sup. Co. 

Ohmer Fare Register Co. 

Rooke Auto, Register Co. 
Reinforcement, Concrete. 

American Steel & Wire Co. 
Relays. 

I'rotective Signal Mfg. Co. 
Repair Shop Appliances. (See 

also Coil, Banding and Wind- 
ing Machinery.) 

American Gen'l Eng'g Co. 

Columbia M. W. & M. I. Co. J 

Elec. Service Supplies Co. 
Repair Work. (See also Coils.) 

(Cleveland Armature Works. 

Columbia M, W. & M, I. Co 

Electric Operations Co. 

General Electric Co. 

Westinghouse Elec, & M, I'ci 
Replacers, Car. 

Columbia M, W, & M. I. Co. 

Elec. Service Supplies Co. 

U. S. Metal & Mfg. Co. 
Resistances. Wire and Tube. 

General Electric Co. 

Western Electric Co. 

Westinghouse Elec. & M. Co. 
Retrievers, Trolley. (See Catch- 
ers and Retrievers, Trolley.) 
Rheostats. 

General Electric Co. 

Mica Insulator Co, 

Westinghouse Elec. & Mfg. t'c 
Roofing, BtJilding. 

Johns-Manville Co., H. W, 

Standard Paint Co. 
Roofing, Car. 

Boyle & Co., Inc., John. 

Johns-Manville Co., H. W, 

Keyes Products Co, 

Pantasote Co. 
Rubber Specialties. 

Imperial Rubber Co, 

Massachusetts Chemical Co. 

Walpole Tire & Rubber Co, 

Rubbing Cloth. 

Boyle & Co., Inc., John. 
Sand Blasts. 

Curtis & Co., Mfg, Co. 
Sanders, Track. 

Brill C;o,, The J, G. 

Cleveland Fare Box Co, 

Electric Service Supplies Co, 

Jewett Car Co. 

Jones' Sons Co., J. M. 

Lord Manufacturing Co. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. 

Nlchols-Llntern Co. 

Ohio Brass Co. 

St, Louis Car Co. 
Sash Fixtures, Car, 

Brill Co., The J. G. 

Edwards Co., Inc., The O. 



February 6, 1915] 

f;i . — 1 — _-i 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 




I 

I 

T 






University Avenue S, E., Minneapolis, Minn. Creosote Blocks lilled witli liarrelt's Paving Pitch 

Adds to the Life of Wood Block Pavements 



/^REOSOTED wood block pavement on 
^-^ a concrete foundation forms a very 
durable and satisfactory pavement. The 
creosote saturation prevents decay in the 
wood, but it does not prevent the expansion 
of the wood when wet. Laboratory experi- 
ments and service tests have indicated that, 
no matter how thoroughly creosoted, the 
wood fibre still retains some capacity for 
absorbing moisture. 

To be sure, most of the rain will quickly 
run off a wood block pavement and the sur- 
face will be dry in a very short time. This, 
however, is because the surface of the wood 
block pavement gets pounded down and be- 
comes very hard and compact, and thus is 
armored against the intrusion of water at 
that point. 

There is, however, no such compacting pro- 
cess going on at the base of the block, and 
the water which finds its way down there 
is absorbed by the wood and a certain 
amount of expansion is set up. This neces- 
sitates expansion joints, which are always 
troublesome affairs, and which are bv no 



means always successful. 
The ideal remedy is to prevent the expan- 
sion altogether by protecting the block abso- 
lutely from water at the sides and bottom 
of the block. This can be done with Pitch 
Filler. Pitch will adhere tightly to the wood 
at all times of the year and at all tempera- 
tures. Sand filler, of course, has no water- 
resisting capacity, while asphalt filler does 
not cling to creosoted wood as well as pitch, 
which, being of kindred nature, will unite 
and form a homogeneous compound with 
such creosote oil as may exude on the sur- 
face of the block. 

The favorite method of using Pitch Filler 
with wood block is to pour it on the surface 
and work it into the joints by the use of 
squeegees. This, for example, is the prac- 
tice in Minneapolis, which has the largest 
area of wood block pavement of any city 
of the United States. It is also the common 
practice in London, which has 300 miles of 
wood block pavetrient. 

Booklet telling: all about Paving Pitch free 
on request. Address our nearest office. 



BARRETT MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

NEW YORK CHICAGO PHILADELPHIA BOSTON ST. LOUIS CLEVELAND 
CINCINNATI PITTSBURGH DETROIT BIRMINGHAM KANSAS CITY 

MINNEAPOLIS SALT LAKE CITY SEATTLE 



i^— r 



1^1-1" 1 





! I 



'm'-^ 



1~-T 



(Sash, Metal, Car Window to Wrenches, Track) 



[February 6, 1915 



READY-REFERENCE INDEX 

to products manufactured by advertisers in this issue of Electric Railway Journal 



Sash, Metal, Car Window. 
Edwards Co., Inc., The O. M. 
Hale & Kilburn Co. 

Scrapers, Track. (See Cleaners 
and Scrapers, Track.) 

Seating Materials. (See also 
Rattan.) 
Dupont Fabrikoid Co. 
Pantasote Co. 

Seats, Car. 

Brill Co., The J. G. 

Hale & Kilburn Co. 

Jewett Car Co. 

Peters & Co., G. D. 

St. Louis Car Co. 
Second-hand Equipment. 

(See pages 114, 115) 
Shade Rollers. 

Edwards Co., Inc., The O. M. 

Hartshorn Co., Stewart. 
Shades, Vestibule. 

Brill Co., The J. G. 

Electric Service Supplies Co. 
Shovels, Power. 

Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co. 

Thew Auto Shovel Co. 
Signal Systems, Block. 

l^'ederal Signal Co. 

Hoeschen Mfg. Co. 

Northey-Simmen Sig. Co. 

Simmen Automatic Railway 
Signal Co. 

Street Railway Signal Co. 

Union Switch & Signal Co. 

U. S. Electric Signal Co. 

Western Electric Co. 

Wood Co., Chas. N. 
Signals, Car Marker. 

Xichols-Lintern Co. 
Signals, Highway Crossing. 

Brach Supply Co., L. S. 

Cook Railway Signal Co. 

Elec. .Service Supplies Co. 

Hoeschen Mfg. Co. 

Ohio Signal Co. 

Protective Signal Mfg. Co. 

U. S. Electric Signal Co. 
Signs, Car and Track. 

Columbia M. W. & M. I. Co. 

Creaghead Engineering Co. 

Elec. Service Supplies Co. 

Western Electric Co. 
Skids, Car. 

Garton Co., W. R. 

Lord Manufacturing Co. 

Skylights. 

National Ventilating Co. 
Slack Adjusters. 

(See Brake Adjusters.) 
Sleet Wheels and Cutters. 

American General Eng'g Co. 

Anderson Mfg. Co., A. & J. M. 

Bayonet Trolley Harp Co. 

Bonney-Vehslage Tool Co. 

Garton Co., W. R. 

Nuttall Co., R. D. 
Smoke Jackets. 

Auto Utilities Co. 
Snow. Plows, Sweepers and 
Brooms. 

Brill Co., The J. G. 

Columbia M. W. & M. I. Co. 

Consolidated Car Fender Co. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co. 
Soaps. 

Sherwin-Williams Co. 
Solder and Solder Flux. 

Lord Manufacturing Co. 

Westinghouae Elec. & Mfg. Co. 
Speed Indicators. 

Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 

Woodman Mfg. & Sup. Co., R. 
Spikes. 

American Steel & Wire Co. 
Splicing Compounds. 

American Oen'l l':ng*g Co. 

Imperial Rubber Co. 

Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co. 

Walpolft Tire & Rubber Co. 

Westlnghouse Elec. & Mfg. Co. 
Splicing Sleeves. (See Clamps 
and Connectors.) 



Springs. 

American Steel & Wire Co. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co. 
Springs, Car & Truck. 

American Steel & Wire Co. 

Bemis Car Truck Co. 

Brill Co., The J. G. 

Jones' Sons Co., J. M. 

Long Co., E. G. 

Niles Car & Mfg. Co. 

Standard Steel Works Co. 

Taylor Elec. Truck Co. 

Union Spring & Mfg. Co. 
Sprinklers, Track & Road. 

Brill Co., The J. G. 

McGuire-Cummings ilfg. Co. 

St. Louis Car Co. 
Steel Ties. 

International Steel Tie Co. 
Steps, Car. 

Am. Mason Safety Tread Co. 

Universal Safety Tread Co. 
Stokers, Mechanical. 

Babcock & Wilcox Co. 

Green Eng. Co. 

Jeffrey Mfg. Co. 

Murphy Iron Works. 

Westlnghouse Machine Co. 
Storage Batteries. (See Bat- 
teries, Storage.) 
Straps, Car, Sanitary. 

Railway Improvement Co. 
Strike Breakers. 

Drummond's Det. Agency. 
Structural Iron. (See Bridges.) 
Superheaters. 

Babcock & Wilcox Co. 

Power Specialty Co. 
Sweepers, Snow. (See Snow 
Plows, Sweepers & Brooms.) 
Switchboard Mats. 

Imperial Rubber Co. 

Massachusetts Chemical Co. 

Walpole Tire & Rubber Co. 

Western Electric Co. 
Switch Stands. 

Kilby Frog & Switch Co. 

Ramapo Iron Works. 

Weir Frog Co. 
Switches, Automatic. 

Railway Materials Co. 

U. S. Electric Signal Co. 

Western Electric Co. 
Switches, Track. (See Track, 
Special Work.) 

Switches & Switchboards. 

Allis-Clialmers Mfg. Co. 

Anderson M. Co., A. & J. M. 

Cutter Electrical & Mfg. Co. 

Elec'l Engrs. Equipment Co. 

Electric Service Supplies Co. 

General Electric Co. 

Nichols-Lintern Co. 

Western Electric Co. 

Westlnghouse E. & M. Co. 
Tape, Friction. 

Lord Manufacturing Co. 
Tapes and Cloths. (See Insulat- 
ing Cloths, Paper and Tape.) 
Telephones and Parts. 

Electric Service Supplies Co. 

Lord Manufacturing Co. 

Western Electric Co. 
Terminals, Cable. 

Standard Underground Cable 
Co. 
Testing, Electrical. 

Hunt & Co., Robert W. 
Testing Instruments. (See In- 
struments, Electrical Meas- 
uring, Testing, etc.) 
Thermostats. 

Railway Utility Co. 
Tickets and Transfers. 

American Ry. Supply Co. 
Ties and Tie Rods, Steel. 

American Bridge Co. 

Barbour-Stockwell Co. 

Carnegie Steel Co. 
Tie Plates. 

Cambria Steel Co. 
Ties, Wood Cross. (See Poles, 
Ties, Posts, Etc.) 



Tools, Track & Miscellaneous. 

American Gen'l Eng'g Co. 
American Steel & Wire Co. 
Columbia M. Wks. & M. I. Co. 
Electric .Service Supplies Co. 
Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 
Klein & Sons, Mathias. 
Prest-O-Lite Co., Inc., The. 
Railway Track-work Co. 

Towers & Transmission Struc- 
tures. 

American Bridge Co. 

Archbold-Brady Co. 

Westlnghouse Elec. & Mfg. Co. 
Track, Special Work. 

American Frog & Switch Co. 

Barbour-Stockwell Co. 

Cincinnati Frog & Switch Co. 

Cleveland Prog & Cross. Co. 

Columbia M. W. & M. I. Co. 

Falk Co. 

HadHeld's, Ltd. 

Kilby Frog & Switch Co. 

New York Sw. & Cross. Co. 

Ramapo Iron Works. 

St. Louis Steel Fdy. 

Track Specialties Co. 

Weir Frog Co. 
Transfer Issuing Machines 

Ohmer Fare Register Co. 
Transfers. (See Tickets.) 
Transfer Tables. 

American Bridge Co. 

Arclibold-Brady Co. 

Nichols & Bro., G. P. 
Transformers. 

Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co. 

General Electric Co. 

National Brake & Elec. Co. 

Western Elec. Co. 

Westlnghouse E. & M. Co. 
Trap Doors. 

Edwards Co., Inc., Tlie O. M. 
Treads, Safety, Stairs Car Step. 

Am. Mason Safety Tread Co. 

Garton Co., W. R, 

Imperial Rubber Co. 

Universal Safety Tread Co. 
Trolley Bases. 

Anderson M. Co., A. & J. M. 

Elec. Service Supplies Co. 

General Electric Co. 

Holland Trolley Supply Co. 

Lord Manufacturing Co. 

Nuttall Co., R. D. 

Ohio Brass Co. 

Trolley Supply Co. 

Wasson Eng'g. & Supply Co., 
The. 

Trolleys & Trolley Systems. 

Curtis & Co. Mfg. Co. 
Trolley Wheels. (See Wheels, 

Trolley.) 
Trucks, Car. 

Baldwin Locomotive Works. 

Bemis Car Truck Co. 

Brill Co., The J. G. 

Cincinnati Car Co. 

Long Co., E. G. 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co. 

Niles Car & Mfg. Co. 

St. Louis Car Co. 

Standard Motor Truck Co. 

Taylor Elec. Truck Co. 
Tubing, Steel. 

National Tube Co. 
Turbines, Steam. 

Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co. 

General Electric Co. 

Western Electric Co. 

Westlnghouse Machine Co. 
Turbines, Water. 

Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co. 
Union Couplings. 

National Tube Co. 
Vacuum Drying & Impregnating 
Apparatus. 

Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co. 

Electric Operations Co. 
Valves. 

Edwards Co.. Inc., The O. M. 

National Tube Co. 
Vanadium Steel. 

American Vanadium Co. 
Varnishes. (See Paints, etc.) 



Ventilators, Building. 

National Ventilating Co. 
Ventilators. Car. 

Auto Utilities Co. 

Brill Co., The J. G. 

Cincinnati Car Co. 

Glolie Ventilator Co. 

Nichols-Lintern Co. 

Perry Ventilator Co. 

Railway Utility Co. 

St. Louis Car Co. 
Vestibules, Portable. 

Brill Co., The J. G. 

Voltmeters. (See Instruments.) 
Washers. 

Diamond State Fibre Co. 
Gi-apliite Lubricating Co. 
Waste Boxes. 

Garton Co., W. R. 
Welding, Car Wheels, Truck 
Frames, Ralls, etc. (See 
Brazing and Welding Proc- 
esses.) 

Wheel Gauges. (See Hydraul- 

agraphs.) 
Wheel Guards. (See Fenders & 

Wheel Guards.) 
Wheel Presses. (See Machine 

Tools.) 

Wheels, Car, Cast Iron. 

Assn. of Mtrs. of Chilled Car 

Wheels. 
Bemis Car Truck Co. 
Griffin Wheel Co. 
Hadfleld's, Ltd. 
Long Co., E. G. 

Wheels, Car, Steel and Steel 
Tired. 

Bemis Car Truck Co. 

Carnegie Steel Co. 

Hadfleld's, Ltd. 

Standard Steel Works Co. 
Wheels, Trolley. 

American Gen'l Eng'g Co. 

Anderson M. Co., A. & J. 

Bayonet Trolley Harp Co. 

Columbia M. W. & M. I. Co. 

Elec. Service Supplies Co. 

Garton Co., W. R. 

General Electric Co. 

Graphite Lubricating Co. 

Hensley Trolley & Mfg. Co. 

Johns-Manville Co., H. W. 

Long Co.. E. G. 

Lord Manufacturing Co. 

More-Jones Brass & M. Co. 

New Haven Trolley Sup. Co. 

Nuttall Co., R. D. 

Star Brass Works. 

Universal Trolley Wheel Co 
Whistles, Air. 

General Electric Co. 

Ohio Brass Co. 
Winding Machines. (See Coll, 
Banding and Winding Ma- 
chines.) 
Window Operating Devices. (See! 
Sash Operating Apparatus.)! 
Wire Rope. 

American Steel & Wire Co. 
Wires and Cables. 

Aluminum Co. of America. 

American Electrical Works 

American Steel & Wire Co. 

Bridgeport Brass Co. 

D & W Fuse Co. 

Garton Co., W. R. 

General Electric Co. 

Okonite Co., The. 

Roebling's Sons Co., John _ 

Standard Underground Cal 
Co. 

Western Electric Co. 

Westlnghouse Elec. & M. 
Wood Preservatives. 

Barrett Mfg. Co. 

International Creo. & Con. Co 

Ijiiulsle.v Bros. Co. 

Northeastern Co., The. 

Sherwin-Williams Co. 

Valentine-Clark Co. 
Woodworking Machinery. 

Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co. 
Wrenches, Track. 

Jeffrey Mfg. Co. 



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Ctnalng RolUr 


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m»nufacIufBf. 




SUWART 




HARTSHORN 


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InicrrvtonlatMl 


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HARTSHORNS .SPECIAL CAR^ROLLEl 

f or .itrect and stcani railway car*. Ilrackcli aultaMc 
tiaiiae.i uf titling*. I'srd th« world over, r.'h«rc\«r car* ai 

STEWART HARTSHORN CO., onioK and Faciorr: E. Newark, I 
NEW tOrK: 383 latiT«lle St, CHlCiao : .118-344 Wibiih A<r| 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 




It^s all cast in 
One Piece 

No Bushing 
Necessary 

And it's made of 
RESISTO 
BRONZE ! 



Those are some of the reasons for the 

SERVICE, DURABILITY and 

ECONOMY of the 

HENSLEY Trolley Wheels 

Resisto Bronze is a tough, long-lived metal which gives maxi- 
mvmi length of service with least wear on the trolley wire. 

The pitrity of metal we use reduces arcing and the con- 
sequent burning up" to a minimum. 

^,7',"^. '"'"■''^''"8 cavity is in the hub of wheel and can be 
filled in 3 seconds. 

The lubrication is of the "forced feed" method not "drip." 

The Hensley Trclley Wheel is ex|)ertly molded to guard 
against imperfections, lack of symmetry and imperfect balance. 

Maue m any desired diameter with any width, shape or 
depth of groove and to fit our own harps or any other. 

Write for catalog. 

Hensley Trolley & Mfg. Co. Detroit, Mich. 



More-Jones Specialties 

Trolley Wheels and Harps, Contact Springs, 
Motor Axle Bearings, Armature Bearings, 
Truck Journal Bearings, Air Compressor Bear- 
ings, Armature Babbitt Metal and similar 
products. 

More-Jones Brass & Metal Company 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 




Effective 
Ventilation 
Costs Little 



"How much" you pay for a ventilator does not de- 
termine its effectiveness. Simple, inexpensive means 
oftentimes are best. So with 

"GLOBE" VENTILATORS 

First cost is last cost. Nothing to become disar- 
ranged. No upkeep expense. Get our proposition. 

GLOBE VENTILATOR CO., Troy, N. Y. 

6S71 







Insulation 



We manufacture insulating var- 
nishes, compounds and tapes for 
specific purposes. The following 
is a partial list: 

Clear and Black Baking Var- 
nishes for armature and field coils, 
transformers and magnet coils, 
where high insulation is required. 

Black Air-Drying Varnish for 

quick repairs to dynamos, motors 
and taped connections, for feed 
wires, overhead and underground 
work, and for car motor leads. 

Black Finishing Varnish, a quick- 
drying, absolutely oil-proof spirit 
varnish. 

Electrical Compounds for switch- 
boards, junction boxes, under- 
ground cables, etc. 

P&B Insulating Tape, the most 
durable weather-proof tape made. 

For thirty-one years P&B insu- 
lation has been standard, and 
electrical engineers have given 
their approval and preference 
to 




Weatherproof Tape 
Insulating Compound 
Baking Varnishes 
Air-Drying Varnishes 
Solid Compounds 



greatest 
Trade-Marks 

The Standard F»alnt Company- 

I 100 William Street, New York BOSTON CHICAGO DENVER I 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



I ALPHABETICAL INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS 

t NOTICE TO ADVERTISERS : 

PrtntlnK b«srfn« on Toesday of each week. I to Wednesday noon can appear In the Issue of that we«k. but ma 

Changrea of copy received up to 10 A. M. Monday will ai>- | proofs can be shown, 
pear in the issue of the following week, but no proofs can be sub- j If proofs before printing; are required, changes of copT 

mltted for OK before publication. and copy for new adTertisements must be in our hands 10 days In 

NeTT AdrertlsenientM (not changes of copy) receired np j ndrance of the date of publication. 

(An asterisk • indicates advertisements appearing in the International Edition only.) 



A 

Page 

Albany Southern R. R. Co 114 

Allis-Chalmers Mfg. Co 32 

-Muminum Co. of America 47 

Amer, Brake Shoe & Fdry. Co.. 59 

American Bridge Co 45 

American Car Co 127 

.^merican Electrical Works 22 

American Frog & Switch Co.... 50 
American General Eng'g Co... 52 

American Mason S. T. Co 56 

American Railway Supply Co... 55 

.American Rolling Mill Co 13 

.American Steel & Wire Co 49 

American Vanadium Co 32 

American Vulcanized Fibre Co. . 51 

.\nchor Webbing Co 52 

-Anderson Brake Adj. Co 59 

Anderson Mfg. Co., A. & J. M.. 46 

-Archbold-Brady Co 48 

Archer & Baldwin 115 

Arnold Co., The 44 

Assn. of Mfrs. of Chilled Car 

Wheels 74 

Atlas Metal Works 13 

Auto Utilities Mfg. Co 100 



B 

Babcock & Wilcox Co 51 

Baldwin Locomotive Works, The 68 

Barbour-Stockwell Co 28 

Bark River Bridge & Culv. Co.. 13 

Barrett Mfg. Co 46, !21 

Bayonet Trolley Harp Co 61 

Bemis Car Truck Co 76 

Bliss Co., E. W 59 

Bonney-Veh-sIage Tool Co 33 

Borne-Scrymser Co 52 

Boyle & Co., Inc., Tohn 110 

Brach Supply Co., L. S 47 

Bridgeport Brass Co 11 

Brill Co., The J. G 127 

Brown Hoisting Machinery Co.. 10 

Buckeye Jack Mfg. Co 119 

Burch. Edw. P 45 

Byllesby & Co., H. M 44 



C 

California Corr. Culv. Co 13 

Cambria Steel Co 28 

Cameron Electrical Mfg. Co 53 

Canton Culvert &■ Silo Co 49 

Carnegie Steel Co 29 

Cincinnati Car Co 94 

Cincinnati Frog & Switch Co.... 50 

Cleveland Armature Works 114 

Cleveland Fare Box Co 56 

Cleveland Frog & Crossing Co. . 50 

Coal & Iron National Bank 45 

Coast Culvert & Flume Co 13 

Collier, Inc., Barron G 125 

Columbia M. W. & M. I. Co 111 

Consolidated Car Fender Co.... 102 
Consolidated Car-HeaHng Co. . . 89 
Cook Railway Signal Co., The... 24 

Cooper Heater Co., The 55 

Corrugated Culvert Co 13 

Creaghead P^ngineering Co 62 

Curtain Supply Co., The 95 

Curtis & Co. Mfg. Co 50 

Cutter Co 51 



D 

D & W Fuse Co 55 

Davis-Bournonville Co 21 

Oayton Fare Recorder Co 98 

Dearborn Chemical Co 51 

Delaware Metal Culvert Co 13 

Diamond State Fibre Co 51 

•Dick, Kerr & Co A 

Dixie Culvert & Metal Co 13 

Dixon Crucible Co.. Joseph 30 

Drouve Co., The G 117 

Drum & Co., A. L 44 

Drummond's Detective Aeency. 45 

Duff Manufacturing Co., The... 53 

Dupont Fabrikoid Co 73 



E 

Eclipse Railway Supply Co 57 

Economy Fuse & Mfg. Co 52 

Edison Storage Battery Co 60 



Page 
Edwards Co., Inc., The O. M. . . 88 

Elastic Tip Co 119 

Electric Equipment Co 115 

Electric Operations Co 20 

Electric Railway Equipment Co. . 26 

Electric Railway Imp. Co 14 

Electric Railway Journal 3, 6 

Electric Service Supplies Co.... 71 
Electric Storage Battery Co.... 60 
Electrical Engineers Equip. Co.. 48 

Este Co., The T. D 17 

Esterline Co., 'The 104 

Etter, Chas. F 46 



F 

Falk Co 16 

Federal Signal Co 49 

Fibre Conduit Co 23 

Fonger Fender Co 72 

Ford, Bacon & Davis 44 

P'ord Chain Block & Mfg. Co... 30 

"For Sale" .Ads 114, 115 



G 

Galena Signal Oil Co 126 

Gardner & Co 33 

Garton Co., W. R 49 

General Electric Co. .34, Back Covet 

Globe Ventilator Co 123 

Goldschmidt Thermit Co 15 

Graphite Lubricating Co 101 

Green Eng'g Co 52 

^^reims Corporation, H. F 44 

GrifRn Wheel Co 65 

Cri^woM Mach. Co.. G. M 115 

GuHck-Henderson Co 44 



H 

•Hadfields. Ltd D 

T'ale & Kilburn Cn 56 

IT.-Isey & Co., N. W 44 

I'ardcstv Mfg. Co., R n 

TTarthsorn Co.. Stewart 122 

"Ilelo Wanted" .Ads 115 

Hemingray Ci'ass Co 47 

Ilerslev Trolley H: Mfg. Co 123 

Herrick, .Albert B 44 

Hoeschen Mfg. Co 24 

Hope Webbing Co 52 

Hovey. M. H 45 

Hunt & Co., Robert W 44 



r 

Illinois Corrugated Metal Co.... 13 

Tmnerial Rubber Co 53 

Independence Corr. Culv. Co... 13 

Tnternational Creo. & Con. Co.. . 46 

International Register Co.. The. . 56 

Tnternatioral Steel Tie Co 112 

Iowa Pure Iron Culv. Co 13 



J 

Tackson, D. C„ & Wm. B 4-« 

leandron. W. J 63 

Teffrev Mfg. Co 52 

Tewett Car Co 6H 

"•olm-s-Manville Co., H. W.. 2=. 

Johnson, Chas. F 114 

Tohnson Fare Box Co 9^ 

Jones' Son.s' Co., J. M 60 



K 

Kentucky Culvert Co 13 

Kerschner Co., Ire 114 

Kilby Frog &• Switch Co 50 

Kinnear Mfg. Co 54 

Klein & Sons, M 49 

Kuhlman Car Co., G. C 127 



L 

Page 

Le Carbone Co 63 

Lee-Arnett Co 13 

Lindsley Bros. Co 46 

Little. Arthur D., Inc 7 

Lone Star Culvert Co 13 

Long Co., E. G £0 

Lord Manufacturing Co 107 

Lyle Corrugated Culv. Co 13 



M 

McGraw-Hill Book Co 19 

McGuire-Cummings Mfg. Co.... 113 

Macallen Co., The 27 

MacGovern & Co., Inc 114 

Marsh & McLennan 46 

Massachusetts Chemical Co. ... 119 

Mica Insulator Co 54 

Micliigan Bridge & Pipe Co.... 13 

Montana Culvert Co 13 

More-Jones Brass & Metal Co... 123 

Morgan Crucible Co 117 

Murphy Iron Works 52 



N 

National Brake Co 91 

National Brake & Electric Co... 65 

National Tube Co 46 

National Ventilating Co 53 

Nebraska Culvert & Mfg. Co . . . 13 

Neilcr, Rich & Co 45 

Nevada Metal Mfg. Co...., 13 

Newark Engrg. Mfg. Co 48 

New England Metal Culv. Co.. 13 
New Haven Trolley Supply Co.. 

Front Cover 

New York Switch & Crossing Co. 49 

Nichols & Bros., Geo. P 50 

Nichols-I.intern Co 57 

Niles-Bemcnt-Pond Co 31 

Niles Car & Mfg. Co 77 

Northeastern Co., The 46 

North East Metal Culv. Co 13 

Northev-Simmen Signal Co., Ltd. 8 

North West Sheet & I. Wks 13 

Nungesser Carbon & Battery Co. 58 

Nuttall Co., R. D 75 



O 

Ohio Brass Co 103 

Ohio Corr. Culv. Co 13 

Ohmer Fare Register Co 97 

Okonite Co., The 22 

O'Neall Co., W. 13 

Oxweld .Acetylene Co 29 



P 

Page & Hill Co 46 

Pantasote Co 90 

Parmenter Co., F. & W. G 62 

Paxson Co., J. W 50 

Pennsylvania Metal Culv. Co... 13 

Perry Ventilator Co 64 

Peters & Co., G. D 53 

"Positions W.inted" .Ads 115 

Post & Co.. E. L 57 

Power Specialty Co 51 

Prepayment Car Sales Co 109 

Protective Signal Mfg. Co 119 

Publisher's Page 6 

Pyrcne Mfg. Co 53 



R 

Rail Joint Co ; ^. . 12 

Railway & Power Equipment Co. 114 

Railway Improvement Co 99 

Railway Roller Bearing Co.... 106 
Railway Supply & Ctirtain Co. . 55 

Railway Track-work Co 26 

Railway Utility Co 55 

Uamapo Iron Works 50 

Reiter, (1. C 50 

Richey, -Albert S 44 

Road Supply & Metal Co 13 



Page 

Roebling's Sons Co., John A.... 47 
Rooke .Automatic Register Co... 92 
Roosevelt & Thompson 45 



S 

S K F Ball Bearing Co 67 

St. Louis Car Co 78 

St. Louis Steel Fdry 50 

Samson Cordage Works 119 

Sanderson & Porter '»4 

Sargent & Lundy 45 

Sauvage-Ward Brake Co.. Inc.. 108 

Scofield Engineering 44 

Searchlight Section 115 

Second-Hfold Equip 115 

Sherwin-Williams Co., The...... 54 

Simmen Automatic Railway Sig- 
nal Co 8 

Sioux Falls Metal Culv. Co 13 

Smith Heater Co., Peter 55 

Southein Car Co 93 

Speer Carbon Co 58 

Spencer, T. N ■ ■ • 1' 

Spokane Corr. Culv. & Tank Co. 13 

Stackpole Carbon Co 58 

Standard Motor Truck Co 66 

Standard Paint Co., The 123 

Standard Steel Works Co 67 

Standard Underground Cable Co. 48 

Standard Varnish Works 54 

Star Brass Works 61 

Stephenson Co., John 127 

Sterling Varnish Co 54 

Stone & Webster Eng'g Corp.. 44 

Stowe Railway Punch Co 55 

Street Railway Signal Co 49 



T 

Taylor Elec. Truck Co 66 

Thayer & Co., Inc 105 

Thew .Automatic Shovel Co 27 

Tennessee Metal Shovel Co 13 

Tool Steel Gear & Pinion Co... 59 

Track Specialties Co 50 

Trolley Supply Co 56 

Tubular Woven Fabric Co 53 



U 

Union Switch & Signal Co 43 

Union Spring & Mfg. Co 57 

•United Electric Car Co B 

U. S. Electric Signal Co 9 

U. S. Metal & Mfg. Co 46 

Universal Lubricating Co., The. 60 

Universal Safety Tread Co 56 

Universal Trolley Wheel Co.... 63 

Utah Corr. Culv. & Flume Co.. 13 

V 

Valentine-Clarke Co., The 46 

Van Dorn & Dutton Co 58 

Virginia Metal & Culvert Co.... 13 



W 

Walpole Tire & Rubber Co 119 

"Want" -Ads 115 

Wason M f g. Co .^ 127 

Wasson Eng'g & Siipply Co 57 

Watson-Stillman Co 31 

Weir Frog Co.. 50 

Western Electric Co 25 

Western Metal Mfg. Co 13 

Westinghouse Elec. & Mfg. Co. .2, S 

Westinghouse Lamp Co 70 

Westinghouse Traction Brake Co. 4 

Weston Elec. Instrument Co 117 

Wheel Truing Brake Shoe Co.. 58 

White Companies, The J. G 44 

White Company, The T. C 47 

Wilson Mach. Co., H. R HJ 

Wisch Service, The P. Edw 45 

Wood Co., Chas. N ••••■• U 

Woodman Mfg. & Supply Co.. R. 55 
Woodmansee & Davidson, Inc.. 44 



February 6, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 




NOW 
RADIATES 

from the 

NEW 

HOME 

OFFICES 

and reaches 



Candler 
Building" 

220W42nd.S*. 
New Y>rk. Giy 



CAR 
ADVERTISING 

ALMOST 
EVERYWHERE 



^a^win 




ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 6, 1915 



W 



f 
"Competent counsel cannot come from one 
man. All around us are the laws of the uni- 
verse. Counsel, direct or indirect, is wanted 
from each man who knows the most, so that 
we may not be floundering along on last 
week's, last month's, last year's, last decade's 
or last century's knowledge, but use special 
knowledge, today the possession of the few, 
but destined to become world practice." 
HARRINGTON EMERSON 



The italics are our own. Galena Expert Service is 
ready to send men who know most about the proper 
LUBRICANTS and proper LUBRICATION, 

— to work with your men until doing the right 
things, at the right time, in the right way, becomes 
a fixed habit, 

— and to undertake all this on a basis of GUAR- 
ANTEED SAVINGS. 

Have you seen a Galena Contract? Write us. 



Galena Signal Oil Co., Franklin, Pa. 



41464 



01 



-•O.^ 



r-. 



■Z-'^^^rMS 



.^^Bfcnrvi^' 



^^-Ty*.. 



LECTRIC RAILWAY 



'olume 45 
[umber 7 
eb. 13, 1915 



JOURN 



McGraw 

Publishing 

Co., Inc. 




Motormau clumps and rights 
car in two minutes. Ope 
along with regular passenger ti 
Entire car dumped at one oper. 
or by separate compartments 
desired. 



iiiii«i 




UNIVERSAL 

DUMP CARS 

12, 15 and IS yard capacities 

are made for every class of service. 




ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 13, 1915 



□□aaDaDaaaaaaDDaaaaaDaaaaaaaDaDaaaaaaDaaaaaaaana 



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The Triumph 

of Electro-Pneumatic Control 




"The type of control that is destined 

to become the standard of the country." 

(Our Prophesy made 5 years ago) 



ELECTRO-PNEUMATIC Control has been 
adopted as standard by the Interborough Rapid 
Transit Company for the Steinway-Belmont 
Tunnel. 

The new Municipal Subways in New^ York are 
equipping 200 cars with Westinghouse Unit Switch 
Control. 



Manhattan-L 
Boston-L 



Brooklyn-L 
ChicagO'L 



and the Cambridge Subw^ays, as w^ell as hundreds 
of leading Interurban and City lines are using 
electro-pneumatic control. 

HL Control 

has no equal for city 
and interurban service 



Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Co. 



East Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Atlanta, Ga. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Birmingham. Ala. 
Bluelield, W. Va. 
Boston, Mass. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Butte, Mont. 
Charleston, \V. Va. 



Charlotte, N. C. 
Chicago, 111. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Columbus, Ohio 
* Dallas, Tex. 
Dayton, Ohio 
Denver, Colo. 



Detroit, Mich. 
♦El Paso, Tex. 
•Houston, Tex. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Toplin, Mo. 
Kansas City, Mo. 




Louisville, Ky. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 
Memphis, Tenn. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
New Orleans, La. 



New York, N. Y. 
Omaha, Neb. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Portland, Ore. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Salt Lake City, LRah 



San Francisco, Cal. 
Seattle, Wash. 
Syracuse, N. Y. 
Toledo, Ohio 
Washington, D. C. 
•W. E. & M. Co. 
of Texas 




ailway Journal 



New York, February 13, 1915 



Volume XLV No. 7 



Contents 



Pages 317 to 360 



A Solution for the Snow Problem 



320 American Association News 



The New York Railways Company has tested success- 
fully a new form of snow sweper with an outboard 
broom which clears a 12-ft. path beside the rails, thus 
eliminating restriction of the service during snow 
storms through vehicular congestion on the tracks. 



Electric Railway Journal, Feb. 13, 1915. 



The Jitney-Bus Competition 



71/4 cols. 



324 



R. W. Meade, Charles N. Black and others analyze 
economic problems raised by this new means of con- 
veyance. Various regulative measures to control reck- 
less competition are compared. 



Electric Railway Journal, Feb. 13, 1915. 



11 cols. 



Proportioning of Railway Motor Resistances 330 

A simple graphical method of calculating starting re- 
sistances differing in detail from that described in the 
issue for Dec. 26 is given and illustrated, by A. M. Buck, 
Assistant Professor of Railway Electrical Engineering, 
University of Illinois, Urbana, 111. 



Electric Railway Journal, Feb. 13, 1915. 



Higher Fares Ordered in Milwaukee 



cols. 



333 



Commission rescinds low fare order. Says interest of 
greatest number best promoted by rates high enough 
to cover cost of reasonably adequate service. 



Electric Railway Journal, Feb. 13, 1915. 



Communications 



5 cols. 



335 



Mr. Murray's Franklin Institute Paper. Calculation of 
Starting Resistances for Railway Motors. 



337 



Association activity invades Philippine Islands. Public 
Service Section announces comprehensive program. 
Company Section Committee expending liberal effort to 
enlist interest. 



Electric Railway Journal, Feb. 13, 1915. 



Equipment and Its Maintenance 



3 cols. 



339 



Fixed Squeegee for Vestibule Cars. Recording Progress 
in Construction of Cars and Assembly of Equipment — 
By Norman Litchfield. Illuminated Train Number Box 
— By J. N. Graham. Voltmeter Measurements of Di- 
rect Current — By G. H. McKelway. Bridge and Build- 
ing Inspection Report Forms. Siphon Motor Lubrica- 
tion at Budapest. Series Trip for High Voltage Oil 
Switches. New Trolley Retrievers and Catchers. Third 
Rail Cable End Bell. Modern Gongs. Bali-Bearings on 
Storage-Battery Cars. 



Electric Railway Journal, Feb. 13, 1915. 



13 cols. 



Electric Railway Journal, Feb. 13, 1915. 



2% cols. 



Editorials 317 
Mid- Winter Meeting of Southwestern Electrical & Gas 

Association 323 

Reducing the Fire Risk 329 
Northern Ohio Traction & Light Company "Safety 

First" Work 332 

Sources of Creosote Used in the United States 332 

Editor Eichel on Conditions in Germany 345 

News of Electric Railways 346 

Financial and Corporate 350 

Traffic and Transportation 353 

Personal Mention 356 

Construction News 357 

Manufactures and Supplies 359 



James H. McGraw, President. A. E. Clifford, Secretary. J. T. De Mott, Treasurer. H. W. Blake, Editor. 

McGraw Publishing Company, Inc. 



Chicago, 1570 Old Colony Bldg. 
Cleveland, Leafier-News Bldg. 
Philadelphia, Real Estate Trust Bldg. 



239 West 39th St., New York City 



San Francisco, 502 Rlalto Bldg. 
Denver, Boston Bldg. 
London, 10 Norfolk St., Strand. 



United States, Mexico, Cuba, Porto Rico, Hawaii, or the Philippines, $3 per year; Canada, $4,50; elsewhere, $6. Single copy, lOc. 

Copyright, 1915, by McCSraw Publishing Company, Inc. Published Weekly. Entered at N. T. Post Office as Second-Class Mall, 

No back volumes for more than one year, and no back copies for more than three months. 



Circulation of this issue 8000 copies. 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 13, 1915 




High efficiency, long life 
and simplicity are the 
characteristic features 
of Westinghouse Turbine- 
Driven Pumps, which are 
built for hi£^h and lew- 
heads and all capacities. 

The V^stinghouse Machine Co., 

Prime Movers S^ Auxiliaries, 

East Pittsburgh, Pa. 



I 




i 



February 13, 1915] ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 5 



n DaDDDnDnnaDDDDDDDDDDDDDaDDDDDDDDDnaDDDDDDaDDaann a 



□ 



SPEED 

(Speed is good, Safety is better, Speed-Safety is best) 



FIRMLY LINKED WITH THE THOUGHT OF TRAVEL 
IN THE MIND OF THE AVERAGE AMERICAN IS THE 
IDEA OF SPEED . THE RESTLESS ENERGY OF A NATION 
EXPRESSES ITSELF IN A DESIRE TO MOVE QUICKLY. 



□ WE TAKE THE "EXPRESS" IN PREFERENCE TO THE 

g "LOCAL" EVERY TIME. 

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ELECTRIC OPERATION TENDS TOWARDS HIGH 
SPEEDS. SUBWAY AND ELECTRIC TRAIN MOVEMENT 
COMPARE WITH THE BEST STEAM ROAD SCHEDULES, 
WHILE "A MILE A MINUTE" IS COMMON ON INTER- 
URBAN LINES. 

SPEED IS GOOD IF SAFE . AIR BRAKES CONTROL 
SPEED. THE BEST BRAKES CONTROL SPEED BEST. 



Suggested by the 



Westinghouse Traction Brake Company 

Works: Wilmerding, Pennsylvania 

P TTSBURGH: Westinghouse Building NEW YORK: City Investing Building 

CHICAGO: Railway Exchange Building ST. LOUIS: Security Building 



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I LuaaaDaaDDaaaDDDaaLJDaaDDDDDnaaDaaaDDaaaDaaDDaDaa naaa 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 13, 1915 



Electric Railway 
Directory 

for February 1915 



Send 
Your 

Subscription 
Now 



$5.00 a year for issues of Feb- 
ruary and August, or $3.00 for 
single copies. 

The only electric railway di- 
rectory published which gives 
the addresses of all the electric 
railway officials, and is com- 
pletely revised prior to each 
issue. 

This directory should be in the 
hands of every sales manager 
and every salesman selling to 
the electric railway field. 



McGRAW ELECTRICAL DIRECTORY 

239 West 39th Street 
New York 



Febkuary 13, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 




Type J Bond on Ball of Rail— Patented 



O-B Rail Bonds 

For Your Spring Bonding 



If you want bonds in a hurry, the O-B factory can help you out. 
Shipments from stock can be made of all standard bonds. If 
something special is needed, sufficient equipment is available to 
put it through promptly. Three trunk line railroads touch the 
O-B plant, giving unexcelled shipping facilities. 

O-B engineers have had long experience in bonding. Their 
services are at your disposal in helping to solve any difficult 
problem. 

All of the above comes under the head of O-B service and goes 
with O-B bonds which in every step of manufacture are under the 
O-B watchword: 



ii 



Quality First" 



There is an O-B Bond for every condition. Catalog No. 14 gives 
complete listing. 

The Ohio Brass Company 

Mansfield, Ohio 




Type F Bond on Web of Rail— Patented 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 13, 1915 



Every Joint in Your Car Resistances 
is a Bid for Trouble 




A joint in an electric circuit is a bid for trouble. 
And especially a contact joint. Most cast grid 
resistances have many such joints. That's vhy 
such resistances are subject to so much trouble. 
Overloads cause expansion and contraction 
strains and the joints loosen. Trouble starts; 
they heat up and loosen still more. Soon open 
circuits and intermittent contacts occur. Then 
repairs and expense follow. 



XijKr 



MB 

Unbreakable Rust Proof Resistances 

Minimize Resistance Troubles by 
Minimizing Resistance Joints 



E. M. B. Resistances have 95% less joints than cast iron resistances. That 
means the elimination at one stroke of 95% of resistance troubles. 

And E. M. B. Resistances are rustproof — can't corrode and become eaten 
through. 

They're not brittle like cast iron either ; they are really unbreakable. 

We can give many other sound practical reasons why E. M. B. Resistances 
improve your service at a saving: And we can back our talk up by citing 
instances — by quoting real facts and figures from real installations where 
E. M. B. Resistances have effected such savings. Get the facts. Best of 
all — let a trial equipment prove the worth of E. M. B. on your oivn cars. 

Send us electrical data and details of your service for trial set. 



7127 



THE ELLCON COMPANY 

50 Church Street, New York 



FEBRUARY 13, 1915] ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 




In the interest of the public and good service 
local transportation should be a monopoly 
and should be subject to regulation and pro- 
tection by the state rather than by local 
authorities. 

— From Code of Principles. 
Adopted by A. E. R. A. 



The broader view of electric traction matters se- 
cured by the state is practically certain to provide 
a better guide to what the public and the roads 
need, than is a narrow, local view. 

The broader the viewpoint of all concerned, the 
better will be the results all around. 

This same kind of broad viewpoint in connection 
with car design is freely at the disposal of all 
roads which take up the question of 

Prepayment Cars 

Our nation-wide — even world-wide — experience 
in designing cars to meet the various conditions 
existing on our clients' properties has fitted us to 
act as competent advisers. 

Our decade of concentrated thought, our un- 
stinted investment in research and development 
and our record of achievement insure an ample 
return for the small charge which we make to 
those who use the fruit of our labors. 



PREPAYMENT CAR SALES COMPANY 



10 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 13, 1915 




Modern Manufacturing Facilities and 
a Most Ample Capacity enable us to 
serve you to unusual] advantage in 

Solid Manganese — Built Up, or 
Manganese Insert Track Work 

of the Highest Grade and the Most 
Advanced Engineering Design 



Thousands of Miles of Worn, 
Cupped and Battered Rails were 
made as Good as New Last Year 
by means of 

The Indianapolis Portable 

Electric 

Welder 




INDIANAPOLIS Manganese Track Work stands pre-eminently 
for the greatest operating value and the UTMOST IN FINAL 
ECONOMY. It represents not only the highest type of construction; 
but the most advanced engineering designs based on standard practice 
and special requirements. 

We embody in this construction the same economic features which 
we apply to steam railway construction and which has practically 
eliminated maintenance renewals and reinstallations. 

Illustrated above is a special type of Solid Manganese Construction 
for Tongue Switches, Mates and Frogs for ordinary TEE rail, which 
are installed on a uniform tie level. 

We make a specialty of SOLID MANGANESE Boltless Con- 
struction. 

Tremendous money saving adjuncts to Manganese Track Work 
are the twin workers — The Indianapolis Portable Electric Welder and 
its companion. The Grinder. They repaired and reclaimed thousands 
of miles of battered, cupped, worn and corrugated trackwork of all 
kinds last year, all over the country. You most certainly ought to 
know about them. 
Write for complete details. Prompt shipments assured. 



Indianapolis Switch & Frog Co. 



New York 
Portland 



Springfield, Ohio 

SALES OFFICES: 
Chicago Kansas City 

Seattle Los Angeles 



Spokane 
San Francisco 



The Indianapolis Portable 
Electric Welder 



February 13^ 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



11 




You want the Public's Confidence: — 
GET IT 

There's One Way 



When H. W. Thornton sailed from New York to become 
head of the Great Eastern Railway of England he said: 

"The road that offers the best and safest transporta- 
tion is the one that always gets the business." 

Good management can produce good service. 

United States Electric Signals produce safe service. 

The former is a matter in your own hands. 

The latter is available for you. 

Any road can purchase U. S. Electric Signals because 
the cost and upkeep are small. 




United States Electric Signal Company 

^ West Newton, Massachusetts /i ^^s ^ 

Foreign Representatives : 

Quilliam Brothers. Cleggs Court, Chapel Street, Salford, England \^^?^5|^ 



12 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 13, 1915 




I 



SYNCHRONOUS CONVERTERS 



BEST MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL 

CHARACTERISTICS 



ALLIS-CHALMERS MANUFACTURING CO. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS. 



Foreign Representatives: 



H. I. Keen 732 Salisbury House, London Wall, E. C, England 

Mark K. Lamb Hueifanos 1157, Casilla 2653. Santiago, Chile 

Herbert Alnsworth Johannesburg. South Africa 

American Trading Co 

Representatives in China, Japan, South America and Philippine Islands 

For all Canadian Business refer to 

Canadian Allls- Chalmers, Ltd., Toronto, Ont., Canada 



February 13, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



13 



^Phono-[lectric' 



"Phono-Electric'' 

Trolley Wire Will 

Save You Money 

The long arm of expense reaches out the min- 
ute your trolley wire goes wrong; it means a 
general demoralization of schedules, extra cars 
to fill in space, the emergency wagons and 
their crews. 

A trolley wire to withstand the test 
of service should not only be strong, 
but tough and ductile and maintain 
these properties under all the vary- 
ing conditions of service. 

"PHONO-ELECTRIC" is much 
stronger and tougher than hard 
drawn copper wire. It will give 
vou more than twice the service life 
that copper will. IT'S TOUGH! 

Send for our Red Booklet 






wm 









,:«-r^/^'^«^* 



.. 'JJf*''' 




North American Copper Company 
164 Front Street New York, U. S. A. 



Pierson, Roeding & Company- 
San Francisco Portland Seattle Los Angeles 



The Equipment & Engineering Company 
2 & 3 Norfolk St., Strand, W. C, London, England 



BRIDGEPORT BRASS COMPANY 

BRIDGEPORT CONNECTICUT 



14 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 13, 1915 




Type F C Bond 




Type P 4 P Bond 

''The Bond with the 
'Shot-Over' Sleeve''— Use It 

Because its terminals are made of soft, dense copper, forged to shape in 
dies. They are very soft and ductile and will not crack under compression. 

Because the body of the bond is made of pure lake copper, in both cable 
and flat wire types. This gives you a flexible bond, one that absorbs vibra- 
tion perfectly and one in which the strands won't break or crack. 

Because body is forged and welded to the terminals by a special proc- 
ess; and on every "Protected" Rail Bond, whether compressed terminal 
type, pin driven type or duplex stud type, this provides a mechanically pro- 
tecting sleeve — a "shot-over" sleeve — around the strands at their point of 
emergence from the terminal. It allows the cables or wires to emerge from 
the terminals in their original form, neither flattened, distorted, reduced in 
area or burnt. 

In every "Protected" Rail Bond, where vibration is most severe — at 
the junctidn of terminal and strand, you get new, live, unburnt, mechanic- 
ally protected copper to absorb it. This is why "Protected" Rail Bonds 
don't crack at this point. 

In considering your Spring bonding, remember that "Protected" Rail 
Bonds are furnished in compressed terminal type, pin driven type and du- 
plex stud type; remember that every one has the valuable "shot-over" 
sleeve features; and remember that the proof of their service lies in the 
over eight millions that are now in use. 

Wouldn't our broad experience in connection with every class and kind 
of rail bonding problem be of great value to you right now? 

It is yours for the asking, without the slightest obligation on your part. 



Elixttric Simjvici> SuppI/Xes Ca 

Manufacturer of Railway Material and Electrical Supplies 



PHILADELPHIA 
17th and Cambria SU. 



NEW YORK 
Hudion Terminal 



CHICAGO 
417 So. Dearborn St. 



February 13, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



15 



Don't Miss the Special Offer 



•/ 



^LECTmc R.,LW^ „^„,„„^ 



Only a few weeks until this special offer ex- 
pires. Don't wait for the last day. Make 
sure right now of getting a copy at the special 
price to advance subscribers. Merely fill in the 
attached coupon and return to us today. 

Special Offer 

We will send a copy of this book to every advance sub- 
scriber on the day of publication at the special price of 
$3.50. In addition, we will stamp your name in gold on 
the cover absolutely free of charge. 

The price on the day of publication will be $4.00 net, postpaid. 

Professor Richey has produced a book of high authority and 
absolute reliability. It gives the essential reference data on all 
phases of electric railway construction and operation. It is de- 
signed for rapid use. Every article is indexed so that you can find 
it instantly. The book represents a combination of these ideals: 

(1) To present data on subjects which come up in everyday 
electric railway practice, for constant use by the operat- 
ing, constructing or designing engineer. 

(2) To produce a book of service to the non-technical man- 
ager or operator as well as to the engineer. 

(3) To produce a reference book on electric railway practice 
for those who may be specializing in other or allied lines. 

You will need this book. Don't delay. Order today. 



Merely Send Us This Coupon 



McGraw-Hill Book Co. I 



Incorporated 

239 West 39th Street New York 

Publishers of Books for Electric Railway Journal 



McGraw-Hill Book Co., Inc. 

239 West 39th Street. New York. 
I agree to buy Richey's Electric Railway Handbook on 
publication at the special price of $3.50 (15s) net, postpaid. 
(This offer good only in the United States and Canada.) 



Name 



Address 



.B 2-13 



J 



16 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 13, 1915 





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Parf of the Ft 



Regardless of business conditions, maintenance of equip- 
ment such as illustrated must go on wherever electric 
railway cars operate. 
It is a necessary part of operation. 

Fifty-five million dollars is spent annually by electric 
railways for maintenance. 

The bulk cf this maintenance work must start in the 
spring — so that electric railway men are now seeking 
information about anything that will help them toward 
efficiency and economy in making purchases for this 
work. 

And this year as in past years they will eagerly welcome 
Electric Railway Journal's Annual Maintenance Number. 
It is their buying guide. Its advertising pages show 
what's on the market. That is why this issue has always 
been welcomed by manufacturers of electric railway 
materials as an opportunity to present and drive home 



Annual Maintenance 

Electric Railway Journal, 2 



Member Audit 




February 13, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



17 




V'Five Million 



their selling arguments. This year's opportunity, the 

1915 Annual Maintenance Number, will be issued 

March 20. 

The text pages will be devoted primarily to this live 

subject of maintenance work. Shop methods, descriptive 

articles featuring phases of maintenance work, helpful 

editorial articles — all tending further to intensify the 

interest in maintaining equipment in prime condition — 

all tending toward more active buying for buildings, 

power houses and substations, rolling stock, overhead 

and track. 

Make your advertising story a part of this big, helpful, 

interesting and timely issue. 

There is just enough time left to prepare an attractive 

advertisement for this issue. 

Our service department will help. 

Write us. 



imber— March 20th 



^ t 39th St., New York 





;:iSie- 



Circulations 





18 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[February 13, 1915 



Efficiency in Car Cleaning 




In every industry the advantages of the 

Western Electric 



Vacuum Cleaner 



as a^remover of dirt and dust are becoming fully recognized 

ELECTRIC RAILWAY COMPANIES will find 
these cleaners particularly suitable in cleaning cars and 
car furnishings. 

The suction removes the dirt and germs from the 
crevices, at the same time renovating upholstery, bedding, 
etc., and reduces odors from tobacco smoke and other 
causes. 

Ask our nearest house for a demonstration. 



Western Electnc Company 

Manufacturers of the 8.000,000 "Belt" Tetephonei 

NmYark AiUnla Cbiu|v Kkruu Cttf S*n Frint>*c« MsnirMi Lmi^m 

BwHato RKhfMAd MiWanVM Onatw OiIiUhI ToraM* ftnt 

PKJa4*lptua Savmnnah UdunspotM Okbtien* C«r Lm An|*l« W.f<ni^( B*rt>i( 

8«tan Nao OrlMfw [MrM Dm<«* 5«h Ud ■ Ctfr C<l|ui A«i«fy 

P<mt>urth H«u«M Cntuxiuti MinnMpeUa Smn)* V.neoy.*. Mdws 

Cte*«U>Hl D>Qu 5t L«>» Si Paul Portlaiut UiwmlM Do** 

^oKaBBatbti't S>4nvT St. pHvriburt V.inna Butfwa Afraa Tohin 

EQUIPMENT FOR EVERY ELECTRICAL NEED SontLtcTRic 





February 13, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



19 



Modernizing 2411 Cars 



More than $1,000,000 Has Been Spent by the Brooklyn Rapid Transit System in Completing at Its Own Shops 

the Further Improvement and Rebuilding of 1612 Cars and Equipping 1133 of Them with Air 

Brakes — In Addition, Air Brakes Are to Be Installed on 800 Open Cars, Making a Total Expenditure 

of $1,250,000— The Grand Total for Improved Brakes Alone Will Be About $750,000 



The mechanical department of the Brooklyn Rapid 
Transit System is completing the further rebuilding and 
thorough modernization of 1612 surface cars, or all of 
those exceeding 25,000 lb. dead weight each, to fit them 
for operation with improved maximum traction trucks 
with semi-automatic air brakes, automatic slack ad- 
justers, emergency conductor's valve, geared 
brakes for contingency service and minor better 



Read That! 




Peacock 
Improved Brakes 

for the "167 per cent" cars 

(as the Electric Railway Jovirnal 
refers to them editorially) 

Are you familiar with the reasons 
■why Peacock Improved Brakes were 
chosen? There are GOOD reasons — ■ 
many of them. They are told about 
in our Bulletin 5. A copy? 



next three winters, making a grand total of 2411 cars. 
One of the most remarkable features of this moderni- 
zation was that so many cars were handled without 
affecting the transportation department. This was 
made possible by working on the closed cars during the 
periods when the open-bench cars could be used in their 

ely 
ile- 



alsO to affora gieatci ■ytuv'^K.'.iuLi Li^iLi ^..^ 

flashing to ground. 

The geared hand brake is of the Peacock "Improved " 
type, geared 12:4i[!r It is connected with a brake shaft 
consisting of a 2-in. double extra strength welded steel 
pipe to which the sheaves are attached. Two 12-in. 
diameter sheaves are pulled from the hand-brake rods, 
and these are on the same shafts as the 6-in. diameter 
sheaves which are connected to the live levers. The 
use of the sheaves instead of the customary combination 
of levers for multiplying the braking effort was due to 
the limited space and to the consideration that sheaves 
allow a straight pull to be obtained under all conditions. 
With the geared brake a braking effort of 40 lb. to 45 lb . 




B. R. T. RECONSTRUCTION — REBUILT UNDERSIDE, SHOW- 
ING BRAKING SHEAVES, CONDUIT, ETC. 

at the handle is sufficient to take care of regular operat- 
ing conditions. It may be interestmg to point out here 
that it is customary for the Brooklyn company to operate 
the geared hand brake on air-brake cars in certain 



specified zones on each trip to be sure that it is in good 
working order. The geared brake will also replace the 
staff brake even on those cars which are not equipped 
with air brakes. 

The brake rigging is of the closed jaw type with 
safety bolts, so that if the shopman omits any pins the 
brake rigging will continue to operate. It will be seen 



Make the most of it! 



41384 



NATIONAL BRAKE CO. 

888-890 Ellicott Square, Buffalo, N. Y. 



20 


ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL [February 13, 1915 


Your Own 
Electric Railway Journal 

fM ^HESE are the advantages of being a personal 

1 subscriber for the Journal: You receive your 

M own copy of the paper each week. You have it 

1 to read when you want it and as long as you want 

I it. You can keep your own file of the paper for reference. 

II If you are not a regular subscriber, you probably see 
1 the Journal from time to time. But, are there not times 

— and many of them — when you want to read the latest 
issue and some one else has it? Are there not many other 
times when you want to refer to an article in a back num- 
ber but cannot find that number? 

For less than 6 cents a week you can be a personal 
subscriber — you can get all the news of the field while it is 
still fresh and valuable — you can have a constantly grow- 
ing library of your own on all branches of electric rail- 
roading. 

You will never miss the subscription price, but you will 
miss a lot of things if you do not get the Journal. 

Better send your order to-day 
before it is forgotten 




COUPON 

Name 






Position and Company 

Address 






Electric Railway Journal, 239 W. 39th St., New York, N. Y. 




1 







February 13, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



21 




Built for High Speed Service 

Install G-E Luminous Arc Headlights on all your high speed cars — there's 
safety behind them. 

This headlight is made with a semaphore lens for a long powerful beam or 
with parabolic reflector and plain glass door for a wide angle beam. 

You can dim this headlight for intown running by simply throwing a switch, 
which reverses polarity of the arc, or the same type is made with an incandes- 
cent lamp for dimming. 

A special ventilating feature on all G-E 
Headlights keeps the glass and mechanism 
free from fumes and deposit. 

The line of G-E Headlights is so com- 
plete that you can select just the right type 
to suit your various service conditions. 

Put a G-E Headlight on every car you 
have so that motormen can maintain sched- 
ules with the maximum degree of safety. 
Write us for further particulars. 

General Electric Company 




General Office: 




Schenectady, N. Y. 



List of Sales Offices on Back Cover 



22 ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL [FEBRUARY 13, 1915 





XJ 



Form D Form E ^ „ , 

Form M 1 






Form F Form C Form A 



Look Inside Your Railbonds 

and prove G-E quality for yourself 



The outside appearance of a railbond is an insufficient indication 
of its quality. You must get inside. 

G-E Railbonds Are Properly Welded 

Saw the stud on a railbond terminal through to the weld and break 
off one part. If properly welded, a bright, clean break will be 
shown. 

G-E Railbond Studs Will Flow Under Compression 

Compress the terminal of one of your railbonds into a grooved hole 
in a steel block of the same thickness as a rail section. If the stud 
is soft and malleable, a cross section will show the grooves com- 
pletely filled with copper. 

G-E Railbond Studs Are Ductile 

Smash down a terminal stud to a thickness of a quarter inch. If 
the copper is really ductile, it will show no cracks. 
Do not take the quality of your railbonds for granted. Try 
them out for yourself and know. 

Will the Railbonds You Are Using 
Stand These Tests? G-E Bonds Will 

General Electric Company 



General Office: ^^^j Schenectady, N. Y. 

List of Sales Offices on Back Cover 



4510 



Electric Railway Journal 

Published by the McGraw Publishing Company, Inc. 
Consolidation of Street Railway Journal and Electric Railway Review 



\ol. XLV 



NEW YORK, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1915 



No. 7 



THE PASSING Elsewhere in this issue is de- 

OF THE scribed a new form of snow- 

sweeper that has just been suc- 
cessfully tried out by the New York Railways. Its 
principle is simple, involving merely the use of an 
out-board broom to clear a passageway beside the rails 
for the wagons and trucks which otherwise could not 
be forced off the tracks during snow storms. Not- 
withstanding the almost obvious nature of the under- 
lying idea, its importance to the industry is much more 
likely to be under- than over-estimated. In fact, the 
surface railways have become so inured to the losses 
occasioned by snow storms that these have come to be 
accepted as a regular risk of the business, and great 
reductions in gross earnings for periods of two weeks 
or more, such as were reported in New York City last 
winter, are looked upon with calmness if not with 
equanimity. Manifestly, the major part of the loss 
from snow is traceable directly to reduced car move- 
ment. No one cares to pay even a nickel for a ride 
when walking is quicker and much more reliable, and 
just as long as the street-railway track offers the only 
pathway through a snow-covered street the speed of 
the cars will be measured by that of the slowest wagon 
upon it. Of course, it is easy to say that the muni- 
cipality ought to clear the streets promptly, but on the 
other hand, practical experience shows that this is not 
going to be done. There remains only the alternative 
for the street railways to do the work. But if they do 
it themselves, the hypothesis that a snow storm in a 
large city means an immediate reduction in schedule 
speed to 3 m.p.h. need no longer be accepted. 



THE 

EMPLOYER'S 
OPPORTUNITY 



The educational committee of the 
American Electric Railway As- 
sociation has announced the in- 
auguration of the correspondence courses for employees 
engaged in construction, maintenance and operating 
work. For this purpose arrangements were made with 
a well-known correspondence school. Students are en- 
rolling, and a number have already passed sections of 
the courses very creditably. The committee, of course, 
had the sanction of the association in adopting these 
arrangements, which were made only after the former 
had demonstrated to the satisfaction of all interested 
persons that it was impracticable to conduct correspon- 
dence courses by the association itself. While co- 
operation with a commercial concern is not entirely 
without precedent in the association, such an alliance 
must be guarded most carefully if the results are to be 
permanently satisfactory. The correspondence schools 
are responsible for the results of their work, but as 



they have authority to approach member companies 
with the backing of the association, the very consider- 
able influence of the latter will cause many persons to 
enroll as students who would not otherwise have done 
so. The association must see to it that these especially, 
but also all others who follow the courses conscien- 
tiously, are not disappointed. To this end it is the 
manifest duty of every employer to take an active inter- 
est in the work of students in his employ and promptly 
to notify the association officers of any weaknesses or 
defects which are discovered in the courses. The use 
of special correspondence courses by large industrial 
concerns is on the increase, and the officers take a lively 
interest in the progress of their young men. In the 
association courses the same principle applies, but the 
industry is so enormous that greater effort must be 
made to keep track of this movement which, in its in- 
ception, will properly be inconspicuous. 

STARTING RESIST- In the issue of the ELECTRIC 
ANCES FOR Railway Journal for Dec. 26 we 

RAILWAY MOTORS p^j^ted and commented upon an 
interesting article on this subject 
by Mr. Castiglioni. As a result of this publication J. 
W. Corning of the Boston Elevated Railway sent us an 
account of an experience of that company which bore 
testimony to the importance of the subject, and this 
was printed last week. Since then Prof. A. M. Buck 
has contributed the article printed elsewhere in this 
issue. We are pleased to print these articles for their 
reference value and because they contain information 
not readily accessible. Calculating resistances is a 
mathematical rather than a controversial problem. 
There can be only one correct result of the application of 
different methods of solution. The interest seems to us, 
therefore, to center in the method rather than in the 
result. Mr. Corning puts an ammeter on the car and 
records the current and thus obtains data for the read- 
justment of resistance steps. Mr. Castiglioni, by 
methods necessarily laborious, works out sets of curves 
which when completed are applicable to all cases and 
for all time. Professor Buck replots the torque-current 
curve of the motor in terms of current and torque per 
ampere, and by applying to it a simple geometrical 
device makes it possible to calculate the starting resist- 
ances for a given equipment very quickly. For a manu- 
facturer who has to make these calculations by whole- 
sale Mr. Castiglioni's method appears to possess ad- 
vantages as a time saver. For purposes of instruction, 
which naturally impelled the development of Professor 
Buck's plan, it is probable that his method is better in 
impressing fundamental principles more graphically. 



318 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[VOL. XLV, No. 7 



ABOLITION OF SELF-INSURANCE 

A pending bill in the New York Assembly contains a 
serious threat at one of the good features of the work- 
man's compensation law passed at the last session. 
Whether it was inspired by the casualty companies or 
by one of those persons who actually believe that the 
government can do everything better than the indivi- 
dual or private corporation, we do not know, but its 
purpose is to remove the provision permitting employ- 
ers, upon deposit of proper security with the compensa- 
tion commission, to carry their own risks for compensa- 
tion to injured workmen. The fact that all of the large 
electric railway companies in New York City early 
adopted the self-insurance plan after the law went into 
effect last July shows to what an extent electric rail- 
ways would be affected by such a prohibition. 

The alacrity with which these companies took advan- 
tage of the self-insurance provision is ample evidence 
of the fact that this method of insurance is considered 
by railways with large organizations and extensive re- 
sources better than insurance in the State fund or with 
casualty companies. Not only can these railways follow 
the mandates of the workman's compensation law most 
easily and cheaply in this way, but the self-insurance 
method more fully safeguards the interests of the em- 
ployees. For years the large electric railways in the 
State had been paying compensation to their employees, 
even where no legal liability existed, as part of their 
systems of welfare work, and in the necessary investiga- 
tion of passenger injuries and claims they .had developed 
departments that were able with the utmost facility to 
handle the clerical and medical work necessitated under 
the new law. Thus, not only did the existing depart- 
ments make it possible to adopt the self-insurance 
method without the piling-up of high administrative 
costs and overhead charges, but there was also an ab- 
sence of the "loading" charges so inseparable from 
State fund and casualty insurance operations. In other 
words, each company was not compelled to make con- 
tributions to any general fund, made up by averaging 
good and bad risks, whereby the more stable companies 
have to pay the losses incurred by bad risks. Lastly, 
under this method, each self-insuring company was 
made more than ever the guardian of its own workmen, 
for aside from humanitarian reasons the fact that it 
alone had to meet all its compensation expenses gave it 
the most powerful incentive to minimize injuries by im- 
proving the physical conditions of its plant and provid- 
ing safety appliances for operation. 

The adoption of the self-insurance method, however, 
meant no lack of protection to the employees, for the 
self-insuring companies were required to prove to the 
compensation commission that they were financially re- 
sponsible and had to file with the commission, to insure 
the faithful discharge of their duties, high-class securi- 
ties in an amount equal to the semi-annual premium in 
the State fund, less 10 per cent. This latter amount 
had to be deposited in cash with the commission for 
use in the case of any immediate call for compensation 
payments. In the event of any death resulting in com- 



pensation payments, the self-insurers were required to 
deposit immediately the full amount estimated to be 
necessary to cover the risk involved to its full maturity. 
In the light of these facts, it is difficult to see wherein 
lies the justice or economy of abolishing self-insurance. 
Insurance experts are at loggerheads on the question 
of whether or not the State fund is operating success- 
fully. Governor Whitman in a special message on the 
subject expresses his sincere hope that the compensation 
commission may be so reorganized as to reduce its ex- 
penses and states that the results so far indicate that 
"the attempt by the State to do the business of its citi- 
zens must inevitably cause enormous expense to the 
Government, besides the inconvenience and disorganiza- 
tion of private business and injury to private interests, 
whether of capital or labor." He accordingly desires the 
work of the commission to be relieved somewhat by 
making the commission a supervisory party in com- 
pensation settlements between employers and employees 
instead of the settling party itself. If the cutting of 
expenses is so much needed, why abolish the very method 
of insurance that large electric railways have chosen 
for its cheapness and ease of administration? Small 
companies of all sorts must find strength in union 
through the State fund, casualty companies or mutual 
associations, but the expenses resulting therefrom and 
the cost of insurance to self-insurers need not be in- 
creased under cover of politics and the delusion that 
state operation is necessary for compensation insurance 
success. 



THE RAINBOW-CHASING JITNEY 

The more we learn about the cost of operation of 
the motor-bus in city transportation the more apparent 
it becomes that this "menace" is likely to take care of 
itself by the simple process of self-elimination. In 
many large cities there may be special circumstances 
in particular localities which will enable a bus line 
over a short route to exist on a 5-cent fare. But that 
the bus can be extensively profitable and in a large 
sense therefore a serious menace to the surface car, 
is not at all apparent. Several companies and many 
individuals have rushed into motor-bus operation to 
their sorrow. They knew nothing about cost of opera- 
tion and maintenance, and there was little or nothing 
that could be found out about these costs had the in- 
formation been sought. On paper the jitney-bus is a 
gold mine. At the end of a few months the cost of 
tires, repairs, accidents and operation of almost empty 
buses for five or six hours a day usually changes the 
golden glow to a dark blue. 

Even when second-hand automobiles of the five-pas- 
senger touring-car type are used instead of the bus thej 
same condition will obtain, whether these cars are opeM 
ated by a number of individual owners or by a singW 
company. A second-hand touring car represents, oi 
course, a much smaller investment than an automobill 
bus, but its carrying capacity is proportionately less anfl 
the per cent of maintenance on its cost should certain!^ 
be no less. The rate of depreciation obviously is higher. 1 



February 13, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



319 



There is no more reason for believing that a fleet of 
second-hand passenger automobiles can be operated at 
a lower rate per passenger than the automobile bus than 
that the same number of second-hand carriages, when 
horses were used as motive power, could compete in 
cheapness per passenger with a regular horse-drawn 
bus. The jitney-bus competition which has been felt 
so keenly on the Pacific Coast and elsewhere in this 
country as described in recent issues of this paper has 
been largely from cars of this nondescript character, 
that is to say, while there have been a few buses, most 
of the competing vehicles have been old automobiles of 
practically every type, make and condition. 

While there are many owners of private automobiles 
who can testify as to the cost of operation and main- 
tenance of their own cars there are comparatively, few 
reliable data on the cost of motor bus operation. The 
London figures, for reasons which have already been 
published in these pages, are not of very great assist- 
ance because the transportation conditions in that city 
differ so greatly from those prevailing in American 
cities. The latest and almost the only reliable informa- 
tion we have is that of the Fifth Avenue Coach Com- 
pany in New York, and we present in this issue a dis- 
cussion of these figures by the president of the com- 
pany, supplemented by other data, including a very clear 
analysis of the situation in San Francisco by Charles 
N. Black. 

The Fifth Avenue Coach Company gets a 10-cent fare 
and gives 10-cent service, both as to quality and quan- 
tity. Few cities can or will pay for such a service, but 
in the comparatively rare occasions where buses can be 
operated the electric railway company might well con- 
sider motor-bus operation as a supplement to its own 
service, if there is a genuine demand for it, rather than 
to leave it to others. But in support of the claim that 
for general city transportation the automobile can com- 
pete on at all equal terms with the electric car, not one 
scintilla of evidence can be adduced. 

In addition to the information we now have in 
regard to New York and San Francisco, there may be 
cited the experience of Wilkes-Barre and Pittsburgh, 
Pa., and Washington, D. C. In the Pennsylvania cities 
bus operation has not been a financial success, and in 
Pittsburgh it has been abandoned. In Washington the 
bus company has a 3-mile route through the heart of the 
best residence district, reaching the business and shop- 
ping centers, the theaters and several government de- 
partments, yet the six-for-a-quarter fare barely earns 
operating expenses, and in the two years of its life the 
company has been unable to charge off a dollar for de- 
preciation. It has carried a large number of passengers 
per bus mile run, but the expense of upkeep has ab- 
sorbed the revenue as fast as it came, or faster. Any 
railway man who has been losing sleep over the inroads 
of the motor-bus, and those who are contemplating the 
operation of these vehicles as a short road to wealth, 
should study Washington's experience. The railway 
man will save his sleep and the other man will save his 
money. 

There still remains the question of the best way in 



which the electric railways can protect their short haul 
business in large cities from jitney competition. So 
long as second-hand automobiles can be purchased at a 
low price there will remain the temptation for indi- 
vidual chauffers and perhaps garage owners to operate 
one or more of these cars, when these cars cannot make 
more money elsewhere and until they break down, in a 
5-cent fare service along certain profitable routes. This 
is a matter where the municipality can fairly interfere, 
as indeed it has been done in a number of western 
cities. Mr. Black has shown that under parallel condi- 
tions an electric railway can transport passengers more 
cheaply than they can be carried in an automobile, and 
if the company should abandon its long unprofitable 
lines or charge a higher fare on them it could carry 
passengers on the more profitable lines for less than 5 
cents. 

However, the interests of the public as a whole have 
always been felt to lie in the American system of a 
uniform fare. This was what the authorities in both 
New York and Chicago fought for and obtained in the 
recent negotiations with their transportation lines. 
The railways of the country have been willing to haul 
some passengers long distances for 5 cents because they 
also had the short haul business, but they would be 
unwilling to take the unprofitable business without the 
part which shows a profit. 

But the financial side is not the only one to consider, 
as Mr. Black clearly points out. There is the increased 
danger on the streets to pedestrians from an added 
number of automobiles, driven in most cases by irre- 
sponsible drivers, as well as the physical limitations of 
space on the streets. Then again, there is the question 
of taxes, street paving and other contributions to the 
welfare of the city in which the electric railway takes 
a large part. The income derived by the city from the 
electric railway companies from these sources is consid- 
erable, and it is only by the neglect of equivalent obli- 
gations that the jitney can thrive even temporarily. 
All in all, there is every reason why the city should 
favor the electric railway rather than the automobile 
pirate. Regulation can be and, in many cases, has been 
applied, and from any standard of equity it should be 
applied. There should be no difficulty in getting com- 
munities to pass such measures. But in so doing it 
would be well for them to realize that, if they do not 
reserve the right to control the routes of the jitneys, 
and the railways lose business on their only profitable 
lines, it is inevitable that all of the existing lines that 
now run at a loss will have to be abandoned. This may 
be a serious matter for many cities. 

It may be that some vehicle more economical of oper- 
ation than those now available will be developed. Until 
then the electric car can easily undersell the motor-bus 
and give better as well as cheaper service. The mo- 
bility (it may almost be regarded as gregariousness) 
of the motor-bus is an undeniable advantage, but this 
will usually mean merely that it can run where there 
is not enough traffic to support electric car lines, and it 
can therefore take proportionately little from the elec- 
tric railway company's revenue. 



320 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 7 



A Solution for the Snow Problem 



The New York Railways Company Has Tested Successfully a New Form of Snow Sweeper with An Out- 
Board Broom Which Clears a 12-Ft. Path Beside the Rails, Thus Eliminating Restriction of the 
Service During Snow Storms Through Vehicular Congestion on the Tracks 



For every really large city in the United States east 
of the Rockies and north of the thirty-eighth parallel 
a heavy snow-storm constitutes a disaster that is quite 
comparable to a cyclone in its costliness. The spectacu- 
lar features of the cyclone, of course, are lacking, but 
should the snow be allowed to lie where it fell the orderly 
course of the city's domestic economy would be rudely 
interrupted. The alternative is snow removal, and this 
involves an expense which may reach a figure, as it 
has in New York, of more than $2,000,000 per annum. 
Only an extraordinary visitation of nature in a malig- 
nant mood could inflict damage to this extent. 

Ethically speaking, the responsibilities of the electric 
railways in such emergencies are limited to keeping 
their tracks sufficiently clear of snow so that cars can 
move, and to that end, elaborately equipped organiza- 
tions have been developed for the sole purpose of fight- 
ing snow. Yet, thus far, these have generally failed in 
the complete accomplishment of their purpose for the 
very reason that, when the railway tracks are clean and 
the rest of the street is piled with snow, every truck 
and wagon gravitates naturally to the pathway thus 
afforded, and the electric cars are almost as effectively 
blocked as if the tracks had not been swept at all. 

From the practical standpoint this condition is un- 
avoidable. The economic life of the city demands con- 
tinuous movement for goods as well as for persons, and 
an interruption of the facilities for communication 
means almost immediate privation and even danger to 
the citizens. Regardless of orders or ordinances, trucks, 
fire-engines and ambulances are bound to use the tracks 
if these provide the only passage through a snow-cov- 
evered street, and, obviously, the one method of keeping 
them off is the provision of a clear space outside the 
rails which may be occupied by the irregularly-moving 
vehicles. 

Operating Results with New Sweepers 

It is this phase of the snow problem that has been 
attacked, with apparently complete success, by the New 
York Railways. A new form of sweeper with a 16-ft. 



out-board rotary broom has been developed by J. S. 
JJoyle, superintendent of equipment, and the equipment 
engineermg department of that company, under the 
direction of Frank Hedley, general manager, and dur- 
ing last week's storm in New York City this sweeper 
was operated with most satisfactory results. The ma- 
chine is designed to clear a path 12 ft. wide alongside 
of the track, and the actual experiences in its first test 
under the most severe conditions showed that it was 
fully capable of doing this work. 

ine results were lound to be largely dependent upon 
the relative peripheral speed of the broom as compared 
with its forward movement. When the sweeper-car 
moved slowly, the moderately rapid rotation of 300 r.p.m. 
for the broom was sufficient to clear even packed snow 
from a paving surface composed either of wood or 
granite block. When the car was stationary sleet or 
freezing rain could be removed. This is ascribed partly 
to the heat of friction developed at the line of contact 
between the broom and the pavement and partly to the 
minute chipping action of each of the numerous rattan 
stems forming the broom filling. On asphalt, however, 
presumably on account of the smoothness and greater 
heat-absorbing ability, the broom failed to remove 
packed snow except when the sweeper-car was prac- 
tically stationary. 

It is, of course, of the utmost importance (if it really 
is a physical possibility to remove sleet as well as packed 
snow) that the sweeper should be able to clean the 
street surface on asphalt as well as on wood pavement 
because there is much of the former in use in New 
York and because a sleet storm is quite as effective as a 
fall of snow in sending trucks upon the car tracks. Con- 
sequently, the designers plan to increase the broom 
speed from 300 r.p.m. (as it is at present) to 800 r.p.m., 
with the expectation that the increased speed will per- 
mit the complete cleaning of all kinds of pavement. If 
necessary to enable the sweeper to maintain the normal 
speed of the passenger cars, and still clean sleet from 
the pavement, the broom will be direct-connected to its 
motor and run at 1300 r.p.m. 



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NEW YORK SNOW-SWEEPER — VIEW SHOWING BROOM SWUNG IN-BOARD INTO CLEAR POSITION AND WITH FENDER 

RAISED 



February 13, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



321 



One of the most remarkable features of the test in 
last week's storm of freezing rain followed by snow was 
the fact that when the relative speeds of broom and car 
were properly adjusted the pavement was left not only 
clear of sleet but actually dry. What this means from 
a humanitarian standpoint, as well as in the saving of 
expense and loss of time for the owners of horse-drawn 
vehicles, is obvious. 

Another feature of the test on the new machine was 
the discovery that even with light snow there was a 
proper speed of car for every broom speed. When the 
sweeper-car moved faster than the speed to which it 
should have been limited by the broom speed, the snow 
was invariably left across the broom's path in a series 
of windrows instead of being swept completely out be- 
yond the end of the broom. 

Plan of Operation 

The custom followed by the New York Railways in 
snow-fighting at the present time with standard sweep- 



that pass or are passed by the sweeper as it moves for- 
ward. Arrangement has also been made so that the 
direction of movement of the sweeper car can be re- 
versed and the broom can be extended on either side and 
at any angle. This has involved the use of two cabs, 
one at each end of the sweeper body, between which is 
a bridge structure which carries the broom and which 
permits it to be swung out-board on either side. 

The broom is rotated by an independent motor 
mounted on the broom carriage and another motor pro- 
vides power for swinging the carriage out board at the 
desired angle. In operation, these two motors are con- 
trolled by a man stationed in the forward cab who 
swings the broom in-board whenever a vehicle is passed 
and who also varies the broom speed and pressure to 
suit conditions. The motorman who runs the sweeper 
car is, of course, located in the front cab and his duties 
are confined to this work alone. A mechanic is also car- 
ried in accordance with the standard practice of the New 
York Railways, to care for the sweeper mechanism. At 




NEW YORK SNOW-SWEEPER — REAR VIEW SHOWING ARRANGEMENT OF WARNING LIGHTS AND BELL AT END OF BROOM 



ers is to put out all equipment as rapidly as possible 
whenever threatening snow begins to fall. Sweepers 
are sandwiched in between the regular equipment in 
service, at intervals averaging roughly ten cars. The 
sweepers are kept continuously at work on the line un- 
til the snow stops, and as the best of electrical equip- 
ments is used for the snow-fighting facilities, the com- 
pany's lines have not been actually tied up on account 
of sn,ow for several years past, although the speed is so 
much reduced by vehicular congestion that for several 
days after a severe storm receipts fall off very ma- 
terially. 

The new type of sweeper is designed for a similar 
scheme of operation, and consequently, as it will have 
to be used during hours when vehicular traffic is heavy, 
provision has been made whereby the out-board broom 
can be swung at will inside of the tracks to clear vehicles 



switch backs or at the stub ends of lines the broom is 
swung to the opposite side of the sweeper-car and the 
broom carriage is moved to the opposite end of the open 
structure between the cabs so that the in-board end of 
the broom is in advance of the out-board end. This 
operation has been made possible by mounting the sup- 
porting mechanism of the broom carriage on what is 
called a mast-carriage, or trolley, that runs on an over- 
head track supported by the open structure between 
cabs, a small motor being provided to move the mast- 
carriage as desired. 

As the plan of operation involves the sandwiching of 
sweepers in between the passenger cars, frequent sweep- 
ings will be the rule. A snow fall, therefore, will not 
be permitted to pile up, and no sweeper will be called 
upon to handle snow that has a depth greater than 
say Yi in. This scheme of eliminating the necessity 



322 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 7 




NEW YORK SNOW-SWEEPER — VIEW SHOWING KROOM SWUNG OUT-KOARD READY FOR OPERATION 



for "plowing" snow is to some extent a new one, and, 
naturally, it provides against strangulation, even for 
short periods, of the electric car service because of 
teams on the tracks. The anticipated result will be to 
permit practically normal schedule speed for cars even 
during snow storms. As the speed under present snow- 
storm conditions is sometimes reduced to the vicinity of 
3 m. p. h., and as the effectiveness of the present 
sweepers is reduced in proportion to their speed, it is 
believed that a sweeper of the new type will do about 
twice as much work as one of the old ones because of its 
higher speed. On the New York Railways the present 
snow-fighting equipment, which is known to be ample, 
consists of one sweeper for every 2 miles of single 
track, so that the capacity of one of the new machines 
under New York conditions is estimated roughly at 4 
track miles. The cost of the new machines, it may be 
said, is roughly estimated at 50 per cent more than 
that of a standard double truck sweeper so that, con- 
sidering the increased capacity, equipment of the new 
type will really cost less than the old. However, as 
expressed by Mr. Doyle, the cost is almost immaterial 
if equipment can be provided to prevent the recurrence 
of such conditions as existed in New York last winter, 
when two heavy falls of snow in close succession prac- 
tically paralyzed transportation for more than a week. 



resulted in great privation, cut heavily into railway 
receipts, and even left the city open to disastrous con- 
flagration through the inability of the fire department 
to respond promptly to calls. 

Details of Construction 

As shown in the accompanying illustrations, the new 
sweeper-car consists of two cabs mounted on standard 
trucks and connected by an open bridging. Close under 
the roof of this central portion are a pair of rails that 
carry the mast-carriage, which may be moved from one 
end of the bridging to the other by means of a small 
motor geared to the wheels. In bearings at the center 
of the mast-carriage a 7-in. shaft, or mast, is carried, 
and upon this shaft between the upper and lower bear- 
ing in the dropped-frame of the carriage is keyed a 
heavy worm-wheel, 48 in. in diameter. The worm that 
meshes with the wheel is driven by a 5-hp motor 
mounted on the carriage frame so that as the motor is 
rotated the shaft turns and the broom carriage, which 
is keyed solidly to the shaft and is in fact supported 
solely by it, is swung either to the right or to the left 
according to the direction of rotation of the motor. 

It may be of interest to state that the force which is- 
exerted by the broom as it drags forward on the street 
surface has been found bv dynamometer test to be 




NEW YORK SNOW-SWEEPER — VIEWS SHOWING ORIGINAL ARRANGEMENT OF OPERATOR'S CABIN WITH HINGED ROOF 
AT END OF BROOM. THIS LOCATION FOR OPERATOR WAS GIVEN UP BECAUSE OF THE FLYING SNOW 

THROWN BY THE BROOM 



February 13, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



331 



for example, from the characteristic curves in Fig. 1) 
a value may be obtained proportional to the flux : 

-^=fc$ (4) 

Since tractive effort and torque only differ by the con- 
stant ratios of gearing and wheel diameter, the former 
may be used equally well in equation (4), merely 
changing the value of the constant k. A curve plotted 
between tractive effort per ampere and motor amperes, 
as TYWT' in Fig. 2 will then represent the variation 
in flux with magnetizing current. This relation holds 
true only in the case of motors whose field current 
varies directly with the load current. 




(5) 



EUcrrLeJtp.Jt.uma', 

Motor Amperes 

MOTOR STARTING RESISTANCE — FIG. 2 — DIAGRAM FOR 
CALCULATING RESISTANCES 

In finding the increase of counter-emf when the re- 
sistance is reduced so that the current increases from 
/" amp to /' amp, it is only necessary to determine the 
values of tractive effort per ampere for the two values 
of current. That is, 

Ec: D" F 

where E,., and £',-, are the counter-emfs corresponding 
to currents /' and /" respectively, and D' and D" the 
values of tractive effort for those currents. The value 
of Ec, having been found already by equation (2), the 
value of Ecn can be determined from equation (5). 
The new value of resistance will have to be such as to 
give the counter-emf Ec, when a current /' flows 
through the circuit, which will satisfy the equation 
. E-2E., 

^ - R, + 2r ^^^ 

This equation is similar in form to equation (1), but 
takes account of any value of counter-emf which may 
exist at the moment. 

Applying these equations to the example cited, we 
have from equation (2), 

2Ec^ = 500 — 150 (2.036 + 2 X 0.232) = 125 volts. 



This is the counter-emf existing the instant before the 
resistance is reduced. The instant after the resistance 
. has been reduced, this becomes 

125 X l^^ = 135 volts. 



2Ec 

The necessary 
relation 



12.40 
value of resistance 



is found from the 



200 = 



500—135 



Ec, = E — 21 



t-i) 



(7; 



/?, -f 2 X 0.232 
from which R^ is found to be 1.361 ohms. 

The same reduction in torque as the speed of the 
motor increases will be noted, and, when the current 
has fallen to 150 amp, the counter-emf may be calcu- 
lated by equation (2) as before. A new value of re- 
sistance may then be found by the use of equations 
(5) and (6). This process will be continued until all 
the resistance is cut out, and the motors are connected 
in series directly across the line. 

To obtain further acceleration it is necessary to re- 
connect the motors in parallel. The counter-emf per 
motor will be the same; but when the connections are 
changed to parallel the two emfs will not add. Equa- 
tion (2) will have to be rewritten as follows: 

r 

"2" 

Having found the new value for Ec^, the value of Ec, 
may be found by equation (5). By this method all the 
values for the parallel resistances may be determined. 
The table shows these values as determined for the prob- 
lem outlined. In the columns for counter-emf, the upper 
values are for each motor (£,:), and the lower for the 
two motors when they are in series. In the columns 
for resistance, the upper values are per motor and the 
lower for two motors in parallel. 

It may be seen that on points 5 and 9, on which all 
resistance has been cut out, the current will not rise 
to quite 200 amp. This is unavoidable with the as- 
sumptions made. 

This method of calculation lends itself very readily 
to a graphical solution. Referring to Fig. 2, a diagram 
has been plotted between motor amperes and motor 
volts. If the line emf is 500 volts, then when the two 
motors are in series, each will be taking 250 volts, less 
what is consumed in the resistance. The lines SE and 
PJ have been drawn at an angle such that the ordinate, 
ag S'E' or P'J', represents the IR drop in one motor at 
any current /. The line SA has been drawn to repre- 
sent the IR drop per motor for any value of current, 
when the resistance is so chosen as to bring the motor 
to a standstill at 200 amp. When the current has 
fallen to 150 amp, the total IR drop is represented by 
the ordinate S'A', and the drop in external resistance 
by E'A'. If the resistance is then reduced so as to in- 
crease the current to 200 amp, the counter-emf will be 
increased by the ratio given in equation (5). The 
curve TYWT' between tractive effort and current has 
been plotted to the same base, although, if the current 
limits are to be those decided on, the points Y and W 
are all that need to be located. The straight line 
WYX is then drawn through Y and W, intersecting the 
current axis prolonged at X. It will be seen at once, 
from similar triangles, that any line drawn through X 
will produce intersections on the lines UP' and AP" 
that are proportional. That is, 
UA' _ UY 
~AB~AW 

and so on, for any possible line drawn through .X". If 
then the line XA'B is drawn through X and A', inter- 
secting AP" at B, the ordinate AB will represent the 
counter-emf developed when the current has been in- 



332 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 7 



creased from 150 amp to 200 amp without changing the 
speed. The ordinate S"B gives the total IR drop, and 
EB, the drop external to the motor; this latter, divided 
by the current, determines the new value of resist- 
ance. The IR drop will then decrease along the line 
BB' as the current falls off, until, at point B', the cur- 
rent must be increased again. The same construction 
is repeated until the two motors are in series without 
resistance. The current which will be obtained when 
the last point of resistance is cut out may be readily 
determined, since the IR drop in the motor alone is 
plotted as SE. When the last line radiating from X 
is drawn it will intersect this line at some point as E". 
The abscissa determines the current. 

In changing to parallel it is only necessary to move 
the axis of reference for IR drop to the proper point, in 
this case the ordinate for 500 volts, and continue the 
construction from that point. The construction is 
otherwise exactly the same as before. 

As shown, the diagram is theoretically correct, and a 
comparison of the values found graphically for resist- 
ances with those calculated and tabulated as below 



rSi 




















o = 


Speed 


Counter emf 


/ B Drop 


Resistance 




















cfi 


200 


150 


200 


150 


200 


150 






Ex- 


o o 

1 


amp 


amp 


amp 


amp 


amp 


amp 


Total 


Motor 


ternal 


0.0 


2.35 


0.0 


62.5 


500.0 


375.0 


2.5 


0.464 


2.036 










125.0 












2 


2.35 


4.26 


67.5 


113.0 


















135.0 


226.0 


365.0 


274.0 


1.825 


0.464 


1.361 


3 


4.26 


5.82 


122.2 


154.5 


















244.4 


309.0 


255.6 


191.0 


1.278 


0.464 


0.814 


4 


5.82 


7.06 


167.0 


188.5 


















334.0 


377.0 


166.0 


123.0 


0.830 


0.464 


0.366 


5 


7.06" 


8.09 


203.6' 


215.2 


















407. 2» 


430.4 


92.8 


69.6 


0.464 


0.464 


0.0 


6 


8.09 


11.24 


232.0 


299.0 


268.0 


201.0 


1.340 
0.670 


0.232 
0.116 


1.108 
0.554 


7 


11.24 


13.8 


322.5 


366.7 


177.5 


133.3 


0.887 
0.443 


0.232 
0.116 


0.655 
0.327 


8 


13.8 


15.8 


395.0 


421.0 


105.0 


79.0 


0.525 
0.262 


0.232 
0.116 


0.293 
0.146 


9 


15.8* 


453.6* 
amperes. 




46.4 




0.232 


0.232 


0.0 


* 


At 196 





Northern Ohio Traction & Light Company 

" Safety First " Work 

During the past year the number of accidents of all 
kinds on this property was 34 per cent smaller than 
that for 1913, and there were 45 per cent fewer fatali- 
ties from all causes. The number of persons injured 
in getting on or off cars was reduced by 35 per cent 

and the number of col- 
lisions with vehicles by 
43 per cent. This com- 
pany operated during 
the past year a total 
track mileage of 233.2 ; 
the number of car-miles 
run was 8,810,466. 

The safety work of 
the company is care- . 
fully organized in the 
department of the gen- 
eral claim agent, who 
has also the title of 
supervisor of safety. 
He is assisted by a 
large safety committee 
carefully chosen by the 
men. One of the ef- 
fective features of the work is The Traction Bulletin, 
published twice a month for distribution on the cars. 
The Bulletin contains information regarding the opera- 
tion of the company, time-tables and useful general in- 
formation, not omitting a few jokes. An illustration 
used in a recent issue is the one taken from The Phila- 
delphia Times, shown herewith. It was reproduced with 
editorial comment. E. H. Clinedinst is supervisor of 
safety of the company. 



shows how closely they agree. Further, the diagram 
may be used for any value of line potential without any 
further change than shifting the origin for the IR drop. 
For different current limits it is necessary to take new 
points on the tractive effort per ampere curve, thus get- 
ting a new location for X. The shape of the curve, as 
drawn on the diagram, shows that a small variation 
may be made without relocating this point, and the 
error will not be great. 

In general, as the resistors must be used both for the 
series and the parallel connections, a certain amount 
of adjustment must be made of the values found for 
definite current limits. The method of doing this is to 
continue the IR drop line corresponding to the actual 
resistance until it intersects the corresponding dash 
line. The current values will then, of course, not be 
those selected at the outset as the limiting ones. 

The great advantage in the use of this diagram for 
determining motor resistances lies in its extreme sim- 
plicity. All that is needed is the tractive effort curve of 
the motor, and the motor resistance. The accuracy 
depends on the care with which the diagram is drawn, 
and makes no use of assumed constants, so that it can 
be used with any type of series motor. 



According to Railway and Locomotive Engineering 
painful accidents have sometimes been caused by molten 
lead exploding while being poured, and many workmen 
have had their patience sorely tried when pouring melted 
lead around a wet joint to find the lead explode, blow out 
or scatter from the effect of the steam generated by the 
heat of the metal. The whole trouble may be stopped by 
putting a piece of rosin about the size of a hickory 
nut into the ladle before pouring. 




ILLUSTRATION FROM THE 
COMPANY'S BULLETIN 



Sources of Creosote Used in the United 

States 

The increasing demand for coal-tar creosote in the 
United States and the apprehension regarding the 
supply because of the European war, makes the ques- 
tion of our sources of supply a pertinent one. In a 
recent issue of the Wood Preservers' Bulletin it is 
stated that the consumption of coal-tar creosote in the 
United States during 1913 amounted to 109,373,359 
gal., which was the largest on record. Of this amount 
less than 40 per cent was produced in this country, 
while that imported totaled more than 69,800,000 gal, 
or 64.4 per cent of the total consumption. Practically 
all of the coal-tar creosote imported came from coun- 
tries now at war, although as stated in the proceedings 
of the American Wood Preservers Association's last 
annual convention, shipments are still being made from 
all these countries except Germany. According to the 
information furnished by the United States Department 
of Foreign Commerce, the sources of supply and their 
growth in 1912 and 1913 were as follows: 

Imports of Creosote 

, 1912 V , 1913 , 

Imported from Gallons Gallons 

^"Belgium 396,652 tl9.103 7,675,174 $326,925 

rlrmTny".".!!!'. ;!".■.■. 15,602,683 6"lV,454 17,9V7'.56i 7oV,802 

Netherh-inds 3 638.793 161,700 7,062,248 412,003 

Sweden 9,588 1,124 3,600 618 

^n^la^"^^"!"::... 21,380,832 1,064,143 22,383,966 1,268.988 

Scotland ..:. 9:596;i83 428,298 13,581,965 930,954 

Ireland 635 40 j 

Total Europe 50.625,366 $2,285,862 68,664,454 $3,644,290 

North Ameflca 1.672,836 95,724 l,151.ii24 67.05» 

Total Imports 62,298,202 $2,381,586 69,805,678 $3,711,340 i 



¥ 



February 13, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



333 



Higher Fares Restored in Milwaukee 

Commission Rescinds Low Fare Order — Says Interest of Greatest Number Best Promoted by Rates High 

Enough to Cover Cost of Reasonably Adequate Service 



An order has been issued by the Railroad Commission 
ot Wisconsin rescinding the decision of Aug. 23, 1912, 
which required the Milwaukee Electric Railway & Light 
Company to discontinue the ticket rate of twenty-five 
tickets for $1 and substitute therefor a ticket rate of 
thirteen for 50 cents. The decision of the commission, 
dated Jan. 30, 1913, is signed by John H. Roemer, who 
has just retired as chairman, and Halford Erickson. 
David Harlowe, the third member of the commission, 
who has also retired, did not sign the decision. 

The order was issued after a hearing on a petition of 
Christ Woehsner, Mayor of Cudahy, Wis. He expressed 
his belief that the order of Aug. 23, 1912, was unrea- 
sonable and unjust in preventing the Milwaukee Electric 
Railway & Light Company from getting a fair return. 
He asked that the order be so modified that the earnings 
of the suburban railway system owned by the Milwaukee 
Light, Heat & Traction Company and the earnings of 
the city system of The Milwaukee Electric Railway & 
Light Company should be combined and considered as a 
whole. 

Counsel for the city of Milwaukee objected that the 
complaint should be dismissed on the ground that under 
the railroad commission law an individual does not have 
the right to complain as to the amount of earnings made 
by a corporation under an order of a commission ; that 
the proper method to test orders is through the right of 
appeal provided in the statutes. Counsel for the city 
also felt that the Milwaukee Light, Heat & Traction 
Company had no franchise to do business within the city 
limits of Milwaukee. 

The Milwaukee Electric Railway & Light Company 
declared that by the modifying order issued Oct. 28, 
1914, the commission unjustly and improperly extended 
fare limits and reduced rates of fare of the company and 
the Milwaukee Light, Heat & Traction Company. On 
Dec. 5, 1914, the Milwaukee Light, Heat & Traction 
Company instituted an action in the Circuit Court of 
Dane County against the Railroad Commission alleging 
that the order of Oct. 28, 1914, did not provide a fair 
and equitable return upon the property. The company 
also declared that the ordinance of Jan. 2, 1900, and 
other franchises constitute contracts. The company 
alleged that the return on the street railway system for 
many years has been and is now less than 5 per cent per 
annum, whether based on the proper investment therein 
or on the fair value of the property used and useful in 
the conduct of the railway, and that the rate of return 
which would be earned under the rates of fare existing 
prior to the order of Aug. 23, 1912, has been at all times 
and would be less than 6 per cent per annum, whether 
based on the investment in the street railway property 
or on the fair value thereof, and that the order of Aug. 
23, 1912, requires reductions in the fares which will 
diminish the revenues and return more than $170,000 
per year. 

The Milwaukee Light, Heat & Traction Company in 
an answer to the petition alleged that the return which 
it is now earning and has earned for many years on its 
railway system is less than 5 per cent per annum, 
whether based upon the proper investment or the fair 
value of the property used and useful for railway pur- 
poses. 

Physical Property Changes Large 

I In taking up the changes which have occurred since 
I Dec. 31, 1911, and their effect upon the future, the de- 



cision first considers physical property. By far the 
most significant of the factors which have contributed to 
the changed conditions existing at present have been 
the additions to physical property. During the four 
years ending Jan. 1, 1915, the additions aggregated $4,- 
691,843, resulting in a total cost new of $15,206,044 or 
an increase of 44.6 per cent over the property on Jan. 
1, 1911. In round numbers the physical property used 
for railway purposes by the company in Milwaukee in- 
creased from approximately $10,000,000 in 1910 to $15,- 
000,000 at the beginning of 1915, or 50 per cent. In 
1910 the revenues a,mounted to $3,787,323, producing an 
investment ratio of 38.1 per cent. For 1911 the rev- 
enues of $3,969,072 resulted in the slightly lower ratio 
of 37.7 per cent, while for 1914,, with property at $15,- 
000,000 and revenues of $4,110,717, the ratio is 27.35 
per cent, or a decrease of more than 10 per cent. 

"In other words," adds the commission, "in 1911 there 
existed $2.65 of property for every $1 of revenue, which 
increased to $3.66 of property for every $1 of revenue 
in 1914. To place the year 1914 upon the same profit- 
able basis as that of 1911 it is significant to show that 
the revenues should have totaled $5,665,186, or a neces- 
sary increase in 1914 over 1911, assuming the same 
operating ratio, of $1,702,114, or 43 per cent. This 
last figure, compared with the actual increase in rev- 
enues of 1914 over 1911, $147,645, or 3.7 per cent, brings 
out the differences in conditions admirably. It may be 
contended that this comparison would be effected by 
the depressed business conditions during the latter half 
of 1914, but the maximum revenues collected by the 
company during its entire history occurred in 1913 and 
were only greater by $110,592 than those of 1914." 

In analyzing the expenditures for additions the com- 
mission called attention to paving as an important item 
contributing to the decrease in net earnings. The ex- 
penditure for four years was $593,871, or 14.5 per cent 
of the total other additions to property. 

Maintenance Costs Higher 

Maintenance at present requires higher relative 
charges than those prevailing during the period covered 
by the 3-cent fare case. This is due to several reasons. 
There was an element of deferred maintenance in 1908 
to 1911, inclusive. The new physical property installed 
since 1911 has caused additional maintenance to cover 
new property and has caused the maintenance per unit 
to increase and, finally, the nation-wide increases in 
prices of materials and wages have affected the urban 
transportation business very materially. 

In the service case the commission concluded that at 
least 1.8 cents per car-mile would be required to keep 
equipment in proper repair. The company contended 
for and still contends for 2.006 cents per car-mile as an 
adequate allowance for maintenance of equipment. The 
final necessary cost, the commission declares, is certain 
to be from 0.5 cent to 0.7 cent per car-mile higher than 
the average prevailing during 1908 to 1911. The final 
average of 1.8 cents per car-mile or higher indicates the 
amount of additional maintenance which will be required 
to cover pay-as-you-enter mechanism, air brakes, sign 
and signal systems, etc., added to the old equipment. 

If no appreciable increases have appeared in main- 
tenance due to other new property there is no doubt 
that these will occur within several years when the 
newness of the additions has worn off. 



334 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 7 



Operation 

Certain increases in wages of labor, expense of super- 
vision and general overhead charges have been due to 
larger power plant and repair-shop capacity, additional 
crosstown lines, single-fare extensions, additional car- 
house accommodations and other developments. Train- 
men's wages per car-hour in 1911 cost 49 cents, in 1912 
49.8 cents, in 1913 51.5 cents and in 1914 53.8 cents. 
During 1914 an increase of $83,400 took place over 1911, 
of which about $24,000 was traceable to the spread of 
duty and minimum wage policy, $2,700 to fare-box col- 
lectors placed at important intersections where heavy 
loading occurs during the rush hour periods, and $58,000 
to wage increases. 

Revenues 

In 1909 operating revenues increased 7.6 per cent over 
the preceding year, in 1910 9.2 per cent, in 1911 4.7 per 
cent, in 1912 4.3 per cent and in 1913 2.2 per cent, while 
in 1914 there was a decrease of 2.6 per cent. 

In 1908 operating expenses, taxes and depreciation 
were approximately 65 per cent of revenues. In 1913 
the percentage was 75, and in 1914, 78. 

Rides per capita increased from about 100 in 1897 
to 250 in 1913. Recent indications point to the ten- 
dency that the present growth in rides per capita is not 
keeping pace with the former growth nor with the popu- 
lation curve. Revenues per capita increased from $5.39 
in 1897 to $10.43 in 1913. The situation seems to be 
that the riding habit is approaching a more complete 
saturation than ever before in the history of the com- 
pany of eighteen years. 

Another factor is the decreasing average revenue per 
revenue passenger. The proportion of passengers pay- 
ing cash fares has decreased to 15.68 per cent in 1914. 
The cash-fare passengers were 84 per cent of the total 
revenue passengers in 1900. The average fare has 
reached as low as 4.163 cents for 1914, whereas prior to 
1900 it was approximately 5 cents. 

Another important cause is the extended use of trans- 
fers. The per cent of revenue passengers using trans- 
fers increased from 25.52 in 1897 to 36.94 in 1913 and 
39.66 per cent in 1914. Revenue passengers decreased 
from 100,073,659 in 1913 to 97,874,919 in 1914, or a 
difference of 2,198,740, while transfer passengers in- 
creased from 37,402,570 in 1913 to 39,263,919 in 1914, 
or a difference of 1,861,349. The most important causes 
were the installation of crosstown lines and extended 
transfer privileges. A conservative estimate of the an- 
nual loss occasioned by the use of these privileges is 
$80,000 for 1914 alone. 

Among other causes which are affecting revenues 
adversely are automobiles, cycle cars and motorcycles. 

Another more tangible cause is the order of the com- 
mission. The probable full effect of the issue of the 
tickets under the reduction order would be to reduce 
the revenues for 1912 by an additional amount of 
$116,000, and those for 1913 and 1914 by additional 
amounts of respectively $58,000 and $63,000. 

Finally the general trend of industrial and financial 
conditions has increased materially the prices of ma- 
terial, labor and capital and altered economic conditions 
considerably in many ways. During the past eighteen 
years prices on commodities generally appear to have 
increased not far from 50 per cent, while labor in prac- 
tically all lines also commands much higher prices. 

The commission reached the conclusion that no en- 
couragement can be found that for a considerable time 
to come the revenues can recoup th"ir own losses, due 
to both permanent and temporary causes, and also make 
up the relative differences which now exist in the in- 
vestment and operating ratios due to the large addi- 



tions to physical property with the attendant outlays, 
to the increased costs in maintenance charges and opera- 
tion and to the constantly increasing demands upon 
revenues on account of public requirement. 

Income Account 

No allowances were made for working capital or 
going value, as it was not deemed essential for the 
general conclusions reached in this decision to deter- 
mine a final value. 

Summary ok t.hk Milwaukee Electric Railway & Light Com- 
pany — Income Accounts, 1912-14 

1912 1913* 1914 

Cash investment $16,563,559 $17,508,284 $19, 246, 541s 

Per cent return 6.377 5.906 3.634 

Commission's earning value. $12,502,836 $13,862,874 $15,441,000 

Per cent return 8.448 7.460 4.530 

.Tax commission's value..., $18,191,000 $18,700,000 $20,235,104 

Per cent return 5.806 5.530 3.457 

Note — Values under 1912 and 1913, as of Jan. 1. Values under 
1914 as of June 30. 

Summary of the Milwaukee Light, Heat & Traction Company 
— Income Accounts, 1912-14 

1912 1913* 1914» 

Cash investment $7,781,305 $7,890,635 $8,124,627 

-Per cent return 2.800 2.907 3.739 

Commission's earning value. . $6,184,929 $6,195,208 $6,274,889 

Per cent return 3.523 3,702 4,841 

Tax commission's value $5,780,000 $6,900,000 $7,084,000 

Per cent return 3,769 3.324 4.289 

*Year ending June 30, - 

Note — Values as of Jan. 1. 

Percentage returns upon the cost of reproduction for 
the city company as of Jan. 1, 1912, 1913 and 1914, 
respectively, were 9.87, 7.29 and 5.45. For the traction 
company the returns for these years were 2.16, 3.77, 
2.28. Taking the two companies combined the per- 
centage returns were 7.29, 6.14 and 4.47. The income 
account of the city company, which was used as the 
basis for these calculations, does not reflect the actual 
condition of the finances. The amount of revenue de- 
ducted on the basis of the coupon redemption reserve 
fund has not equalled the probable reduction in rev- 
enues when the thirteen-for-50-cents tickets should be 
sold as ordered originally. To place the income account 
for the three years subject to the estimated effect would 
require a reduction of $116,000 in 1912, $58,000 in 1913 
and $63,000 in 1914, resulting in a per cent return on 
the cost new for the years named of 8.92, 6.86 and 4.79. 
It has been estimated that an additional amount for 
the improvement of service will no doubt aggregate 
approximately $100,000. When this allowance is incor- 
porated in the income account together with an allow- 
ance for reduction in revenues on the basis of the full 
effect of thirteen-for-50-cents tickets, the per cent re- 
turns are reduced to 8.10 for the year 1912, 6.12 for 
1913 and 3.7 for 1914. Another burden upon the city 
company is the deficits in suburban territory. It falls 
upon the city system income account to produce suffi- 
cient net earnings to provide something like fair returns 
upon the suburban plant values. When these plant 
values are included in the income account of the city 
company together with the allowance for the additional 
reduction to the thirteen-for-50-cents tickets and for 
service requirements the per cent returns foot up to 
7.38 in 1912, 5.61 in 1913 and 3.48 in 1914. "Any ad- 
justments that can possibly be made," the commission 
adds, "will not prevent the conclusion that during the 
last two calendar years the revenues have not been suffi- 
cient to cover all legitimate demands for the adequate 
transportation of passengers in the city of Milwaukee 
and the adjacent suburban territory." 

Income accounts in the accompanying table, although 
not accepted by the commission in their entirety, "con- 
tain certain merits which warrant a summary repre- 
sentation in this decision." 



1 



ft 



February 13, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



335 



Conclusion 



"The increases in the operating expenses and fixed 
charges of the companies and the failure of their gross 
and net revenues to maintain their ordinary annual 
growth during the past few years are due to causes 
that are wholly beyond the control of the companies," 
the commission says in conclusion. "The net earnings 
of the respondent now are and for some time have been 
considerably lower on the investment than the rates or 
costs at which it is well known new capital for similar 
undertakings can in the long run be had. The con- 
ditions in this respect are also considerably aggravated 
by the fact that in this case, as in nearly all large and 
growing cities, there is a constantly growing demand 
for improvements in and extensions to the local street 
railway service. 

"The tendencies and changes in the expenses and 
earnings in question were seen when the order com- 
plained of was made, but it was not then thought that 
they were permanent but rather temporary in their 
nature. Had the nature of these changes then been 
better understood it is very certain that the order 
would not have been made. Justice and the law demand 
that the rates charged by public utilities for the serv- 
ices they render shall be reasonable to the utilities as 
well as to their patrons. The best interest of the great- 
est number in matters of this kind can as a rule be best 
promoted by allowing rates that are high enough to 
cover the cost of reasonably adequate service. As the 
rates provided by the order complained of fall short of 
this, we are in fairness to the petitioner and in the in- 
terest of patrons compelled to find that this order is un- 
reasonable and that it should be repealed or abrogated." 

Comment of Mr. Mortimer on the Decision 

Commenting on the decision of the Railroad Commis- 
sion of Wisconsin, James D. Mortimer, president of the 
Milwaukee Electric Railway & Light Company, said to 
the Electric Railway Journal: 

"The order of the commission restoring the franchise 
rates of fare prevailing prior to the previous order of 
Aug. 23, 1912, was determined upon after a most thor- 
ough examination of the facts and the finances of the 
railway department of the Milwaukee Electric Railway & 
Light Company. The original order of 1912 was predi- 
cated upon a relation between earnings and value of 
property which was the maximum ever attained in the 
history of the company. During 1911 and 1912, the com- 
pany was engaged in a large amount of construction work 
which added very materially to its property account. The 
original decision contained no adequate recognition of 
this large additional investment then in process of com- 
pletion or the further investment that would be required 
during the remainder of 1912 and during the year 1913. 
This additional investment, together with expenses 
arising out of higher wages, greater expense on account 
of injuries and damages, and additional burdens imposed 
by virtue of the police powers of the municipality, such 
as sprinkling streets, replacing pavement not apparently 
contemplated under the franchise, and raising and low- 
ering tracks to conform to new grades, all contributed 
to bring about the low ratio between net earnings and 
value of physical property, upon which the commission 
based its recent rescinding order. 

"The commission has indicated its breadth of view 
and strength of character in frankly admitting that the 
order of 1912 was in error and was issued without suffi- 
ciently complete recognition of the then current ten- 
dencies of the costs of street railway operation. 

"The facts would have justified a rate of fare higher 
than 6 tickets for 25 cents and 25 tickets for $1, but in 
view of these long established commutation rates, any 



departure therefrom would probably not be in line with 
sound public policy. Even with rates of fare lower than 
the standard nickel, the same aggregate return may be 
attained by shortening the length of haul for a single 
fare. There are opportunities for this treatment on a 
number of our suburban lines." 



COMMUNICATIONS 



Mr. Murray's Franklin Institute Paper 

Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company 

East Pittsburgh, Pa., Feb. 5, 1915. 
To the Editors: 

In your issue of Jan. 30 you give an abstract of a 
paper by W. S. Murray, which was presented at Phila- 
delphia on Jan. 20. This last paper on the New Haven 
electrification, giving as it does costs of operation, is 
of the greatest interest, as, in fact, are all of Mr. Mur- 
ray's papers. The costs given speak for themselves 
and need no comment. It may not be amiss, however, 
to discuss some of the statements in the remainder of 
the paper. The pause in the onward march of the 
electrification of steam railways, due to financial de- 
pression, is not an unmixed evil. It is of great value 
not only to the railways themselves but to the manu- 
facturing companies. It offers an opportunity for a 
study of ways and means, of necessity and cost, of ad- 
vantages and disadvantages of electrification, and for 
planning the work which it is recognized must come 
sooner or later, so that it can be done in the most 
economical manner and at the same time secure the 
maximum of advantage. The writer is very much op- 
posed to legislation designed to force the electrification 
of steam railways. Electrification under such condi- 
tions will inevitably cost a great deal more than neces- 
sary and the city securing electrification by such means 
will lose a great part of the advantage which it should 
have. The work would have to be done under pressure, 
and plans which really require years of study would 
have to be rushed through in a few months. The ex- 
amples of electrification which are now in progress 
are in places where an actual financial saving will 
result from them, and this is what every thorough 
electrical engineer expects will ultimately be the case 
on a great many of the roads in this country. The 
problem is so vast, however, that it must not be forced 
or there will be a heavy loss instead of a financial 
gain. 

Another subject which is touched upon in Mr. Mur- 
ray's paper is the administration in electrical operation. 
Manufacturers of electric locomotives are familiar with 
the expression "That is railroading," which has come 
to mean that the operating men expect a locomotive 
to stand any amount of abuse that can be heaped 
upon it no matter whether it is injured or not; that 
it will be expected to haul continuously any load that it 
can start. This method of operation is usually sufllicient 
to eliminate entirely any possibility of financial profit 
from the investment in electrification, and reduces the 
matter simply to a question of how much more it is 
going to cost the company to operate electrically than 
by steam. Fortunately, as Mr. Murray says, this atti- 
tude has changed to a great extent on railroads where 
the operating men are coming to understand that 
electrical apparatus has limitations and that it costs 
vastly more to maintain it if it is abused than if it is 
treated as any valuable piece of machinery should be 
treated — namely, with some degree of intelligence and 
respect. There is nothing in Mr. Murray's paper that 
is any truer than this statement: "Successful electrifi- 
cation, therefore, requires that there be in the admin- 



336 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 7 



istrative forces men trained to the necessity of a 
different viewpoint from that which has been developed 
in eighty years of steam service." 

The writer would, however, take issue with Mr. Mur- 
ray as to the disadvantage of the employment of steam 
locomotive engineers for operating electric locomotives. 
He believes that such men, if properly educated as to 
the capabilities and limitations of these locomotives, will 
operate them as well as new men specially trained. 
They must, however, be given a proper point of view 
by men who are thoroughly familiar with electric loco- 
motives and have authority to enforce their instructions. 

One thing that would be of the greatest advantage 
on a railroad is a more thorough co-operation between 
the motive power department and the transportation 
department than is usually found on trunk-line rail- 
ways. Both departments should have a voice in the 
selection of apparatus for the operation of the railway. 
The transportation department should state the service 
requirements before the capacity, speeds, etc., of loco- 
motives are decided upon. The equipment should be 
purchased upon this basis if it is approved by the 
management of the railway, and, after it has been 
installed, the transportation department should be re- 
quired to adhere as closely as possible to these specifica- 
tions and not be permitted to take the equipment and 
see how much more can be done with it. Such methods 
always result in financial loss to the company and dis- 
satisfaction with the apparatus if it has been designed 
with the ordinary factor of safety. 

N. W. Stoker. 



Calculation of Starting Resistances for 

Railway Motors 

New York, Feb. 2, 1915. 
To the Editors : 

In recent issues of the Electric Railway Journal 
several communications have appeared commenting upon 
the method which I proposed in the issue of Dec. 26, 
1914, for calculating starting resistance. Allow me to 
take up some of the points raised by Professor Harding, 
Mr. Cameron and Mr. Simmon. 

If Professor Harding recognizes that the proposed 
method and the calculation in itself are of interest to 
the manufacturer who is studying a new proposition 
based on certain data, it is difficult to see why, in case 
the data have to be changed or the existence of some 
trouble suggests the desirability of investigating the 
matter, the same procedure shall not be useful to any- 
one else who wishes, with little time and effort, to de- 
termine the correct arrangement of the grids. 

Referring to Mr. Cameron's communication, I am of 
the opinion that problems regarding traction can be 
studied better on paper than by tests because, if the 
variables entering the problem are numerous we can, 
on paper at least, make use of reasonable averages and 
have some basis for comparisons, while in actual opera- 
tion there are many causes of difference in addition to 
the variables under study. Hence it is difficult to ob- 
tain two runs with all conditions but the one in ques- 
tion absolutely identical. This is especially true in the 
problem of starting a train where the sudden "jerks" 
of the current corresponding to the controller opera- 
tion are not easily and precisely followed by means of 
an ordinary ammeter, and are given in an uncertain 
manner and on a small scale by recording instruments. 
To the uncertainty of these tests are added others 
due to the manner of operating the controller which, 
with very slight variations, can produce remarkable 
differences in the current peaks, as the motors are 
operated at starting on the flat part of the torque-cur- 
rent curve. 



Primarily the difference in ideas as to the best 
method of determining the proper resistance is this: 
By the theoretical method, as described in my plan, 
the work can be done on paper, accurately and in an 
hour's time at a cost of, say, 50 cents. By the prac- 
tical method a car has to be prepared for test, the re- 
sults must be plotted, the resistors must be readjustea 
and the car again tested, etc. This process must be 
continued without the operator in the end being sure 
that any final good results are due to a better arrange- 
ment of steps or rather than to changes in some of the 
variables not under the control. 

In making calculations by my method it is not neces- 
sary to make arbitrary assumptions, such as that there 
is no line drop, that resistance grids run cold in city 
service or red hot in interurban service. To take care 
of such matters only good engineering judgment is 
required in assuming reasonable average data, and then 
the theoretical study will yield satisfactory average 
results. 

Mr. Simmons hints at some of the difficulties of the 
starting resistance problem, such as the necessity for 
correcting the resistance on the first step. I need 
simply note that as the method which I outlined is 
based on simple and rapid calculations it permits allow- 
ance to be made for such matters without great effort. 

In conclusion, it should be understood that the pro- 
posed solution does not pretend to eliminate the "cut 
and try" inherent to the problem, but only to hint how 
to "cut" and to make the "trying" less discouraging. 
These two operations might be irksome to the man who 
has not the experience of the specialist and the free 
use of the accumulated data of a manufacturing com- 
pany. F. Castiglioni. 



Efforts will be made to bring about repeal of the full 
crew laws in Pennsylvania and New Jersey at the pres- 
ent sessions oT the Legislatures in these States. Thir- 
teen railroads operating in the two States have joined 
to make a public appeal to the people for their support 
in accomplishing this object. "These railroads have or- 
ganized a committee to take charge of the work. R. L. 
O'Donnel, general superintendent of the Pennsylvania 
Railroad, is chairman of the committee. The other 
members are: C. H. Ewing, general superintendent of 
the Philadelphia & Reading Railway; F. Hartenstein, 
assistant to general manager of the Lehigh Valley Rail- 
road; Robert Finney, general agent of the Baltimore & 
Ohio Railroad; J. S. Fisher, solicitor of the New York 
Central & Hudson River Railroad. This executive com- 
mittee represents the committee which in turn repre- 
sents the Pennsylvania Railroad, Baltimore & Ohio Rail- 
road, Philadelphia & Reading Railway, Lehigh Valley 
Railroad, Erie Railroad, Lackawanna Railroad, New 
York Central Railroad, Delaware & Hudson Railroad, 
Buffalo, Rochester & Pittsburgh Railway, Pittsburgh, 
Summerville & Clarion and Cumberland Valley Railroad. 



The Public Service Commission of Missouri has 
issued its first volume of reports for the period from 
April 16, 1913, to Sept. 24, 1914. Besides the com- 
plete reports of all cases decided during this period, 
the volume contains a table of the cases reported, a 
table of the cases cited, an index of cases by localities 
and also an index-digest of findings for all the cases 
with cross references. 



Arrangements have been completed for handling mail 
at Junction City, Kan., over the Interurban Railway 
from Manhattan, and contracts have been sent to the 
Post-Office Department at Washington for approval. It 
is planned to serve Fort Riley and Ogden in the same 
manner if the Junction City contracts are approved ' 
Washington. 



id^ 

M 



February 13, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



337 



ANNUAL CONVENTION 

SAN FRANCISCO 

OCTOBER 4 TO 8, 1915 



American Association News 



ANNUAL CONVENTION 

SAN FRANCISCO 

OCTOBER 4 TO 8, 1915 



Association Activity Invades Phillipine Islands — Public Service Section Announces Comprehensive Program- 
Company Section Committee Expending Literary Effort to Enlist Interest 



MANILA ELECTRIC RAILROAD & LIGHT COM- 
PANY SECTION 

The organization meeting of joint company section 
No. 5 of the American Electric Railway Association 
and the National Electric Light Association was held 
in Manila, P. I., on Dec. 15. The following officers were 
elected: President, Oscar Keesee, superintendent of 
transportation; vice-president, Arthur J. Grant, su- 
perintendent of lighting installation; secretary, Walter 
E. Smith, purchasing agent; treasurer, E. A. Barretto, 
cashier; directors (1 year) H. P. L. JoUye, assistant 
auditor; (2 years) B. Solano, chief clerk accounting de- 
partment; (3 years) Roman Lopez, superintendent of 
electrical distribution. J. B. Russell, auditor, was desig- 
nated by the company as the director ex-officio. 

J. B. Russell addressed the meeting on the aims and 
objects of a company section, the character and scope of 
its work, its advantages and benefits, and on the neces- 
sity of each individual member doing his share in fur- 
thering the interest of the section. He dwelt with spe- 
cial emphasis upon the advantage of a company section 
in Manila because of its geographical location, far re- 
moved from the headquarters of the parent associations. 
As this isolation makes it difficult for employees of the 
company to attend the annual conventions of the as- 
sociations, they can profit to an unusual extent from 
the local association. 

C. N. Duffy, vice-president and general manager, 

called particular attention to the gold medals awarded 

annually by the Railway Association and the Electric 

Light Association respectively for the best papers read 

j before company sections, and urged the members to be 

, competitors for these medals. As an extra inducement 

I Mr. Duffy announced that he would personally give the 

I sum of $100 to the winner of either medal and that he 

! hoped that the Manila company section would win both 

; medals in 1915. 

Before the election of officers the constitution of the 
joint company section was acted upon section by sec- 
tion. This has since been printed in convenient pamph- 
t let form. It provides for two classes of membership; 
i active, consisting of officers or employees of the Manila 
* Electric Railroad & Light Company or its affiliated com- 
I panics, who are members of the American Electric Rail- 
■ way Association or Class D members of the National 
I Electric Light Association; and associate, any persons 
interested in the objects of the section and members of 
1 either of the national associations. Associate members 
j have all privileges of active members except, the right 
, to vote, to hold office and to attend the meetings of the 
executive council. 

There are no membership dues other than those re- 
quired for membership in these associations. 

The officers of the section are a president, a vice- 
president, a secretary, a treasurer and four directors. 
Three directors are elected, one each year, and the fourth 
is a member of the official staff of the company and 
designated by it. There are two standing committees, 
one on program and the other on membership. The 
latter is to consist of not less than one member from 
each department of the company represented in the sec- 
tion. This committee is to report to the executive coun- 
cil, consisting of the officers and directors, twice an- 
nually. 



PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY SECTION 

The following program has been announced for the 
meetings of the Public Service Railway company sec- 
tion for this season and next. The program was 
inaugurated with the January meeting when the topics 
considered were: Historical review of the development 
of transportation, with particular reference to the or- 
ganization of the Public Service Railway; discussion of 
a chart giving various constituent companies of the 
system, and dates of organization ; and analytical review 
of cost of operation and maintenance for 1914, with 
suggestions for 1915. 

February: Organization and financing of a street 
railway company. Explanation of stock and bond issues 
of an electric railway and the reasons for increasing 
them at various times. 

March: Legal steps and obstacles in the formation 
of the organization. Procedure to be followed in secur- 
ing franchise rights, property owners' consents, right of 
way, etc. Tribulations of the promoter. 

April: Engineering work in surveying, preparation 
of plans and estimates, etc. Preparation of roadbed 
and construction of track and bridges. 

May: Design and construction of power house and 
substation. Construction of line and distribution sys- 
tems. 

June: Design and construction of carhouses and 
shops. Equipment of shops and construction of rolling 
stock. 

September: Determining the rate of fare, showing 
limits of profitable haul per unit fare. 

October: Cost of operation. Including platform ex- 
penses, superintendence, power, etc. Increased cost per 
passenger mile during commission hours. Cost of run- 
ning extra car. Operating costs. 

November: Maintenance of tracks and bridges. 
Maintenance of distribution system. 

December: Social. 

January, 1916: Maintenance of powerhouses and sub- 
stations. Maintenance of equipment. 

February : Claim Department. Welfare work. Costs 
of accidents. Costs of welfare work. 

March : Overhead charges, general expenses, interest, 
taxes, etc. 

April: What constitutes the value of a service cor- 
poration ? 

The above will be followed by six lectures on rates of 
return, valuation, regulation, franchise life, etc. 



TRAINING OF TRANSPORTATION EMPLOYEES 

The Transportation & Traffic Association committee 
on this subject, C. S. Ching, Boston, Mass., chairman, 
has just sent out data sheet No. 127 calling for informa- 
tion as follows: Rules and regulations of public service 
or railroad commissions and city ordinances relating to 
or affecting the employment of men on street railways; 
practice regarding the issuing of letters or the posting 
of notices of commendation in cases where employees 
may have been commended by the public or may have 
performed meritorious acts ; practice regarding the pub- 
lication of company magazines to which employees con- 
tribute, and the issuing of pamphlets on general topics, 
such as courtesy, etc.; opinions and experience regard- 



li 



338 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 7 



ing employees' meetings and programs therefore; proba- 
tion periods and discipline; watch inspection and stand- 
ards, and bonding conductors. 



COMMITTEE ON COMPANY SECTIONS AND INDI- 
VIDUAL MEMBERSHIP 

The chairman of this committee, Martin Schreiber, 
engineer maintenance of way Public Service Railway 
Company, Newark, N. J., is preparing an instructive 
pamphlet on the advantages of company sections. The 
committee hopes to assist in the formation of several 
company sections this year. One of the most promising 
prospects is the Chicago Elevated Railways which has a 
thriving "Chicago Elevated Railway Club." The Chi- 
cago club has a membership of more than a hundred 
and definitely expects to enroll as a company section of 
the American Electric Railway Association, probably 
this year. It gives every indication of having a mem- 
bership of 150 before the end of the year. 



JOINT COMMITTEE ON OVERHEAD AND UNDER- 
GROUND LINE CONSTRUCTION 

A largely attended meeting of this committee was 
held at the New York Railroad Club rooms, 30 Church 
street. New York, on Jan. 27. The discussion was of a 
general nature. 



COMING COMMITTEE MEETING 

Feb. 19, and 20 (if necessary), 10:00 a. m.. New 
York, committee on way matters of the Engineering 
Association, C. S. Kimball, engineer maintenance of 
way Washington Railway & Electric Company, Wash- 
ington, D. C, chairman. 



Annual Meeting U. S. Chamber of 
Commerce 

The third annual meeting of the Chamber of Com- 
merce of the United States was held in Washington, 
D. C, on Feb. 3, 4 and 5. At a meeting of the national 
council before the convention on Feb. 2, Harvey S. 
Chase, Boston, spoke in advocation of a national budget 
in order to give citizens a more intelligent understand- 
ing of the financing of the government. At the opening 
meeting of the chamber on Feb. 3, President John H. 
Fahey, Boston, described the progress of the Chamber 
of Commerce into its present position as the largest, 
most representative and most democratic organization 
of its kind in the world. He told how the Chamber 
was performing its functions of crystallizing the busi- 
ness opinion of the country in legislative matters and 
of bringing into closer co-operation the business men 
and the government. 

At the afternoon session on Feb. 3, William Jennings 
Bryan, Secretary of State, discussed the factors that 
enter into the extension of American trade in foreign 
lands, the advantages of the administration shipping 
bill and the work of the Department of State in es- 
tablishing amity and good-will between foreign nations 
and this country. Following Mr. Bryan, Samuel Mc- 
Roberts, vice-president National City Bank, New York, 
outlined government co-operation with business through 
consular channels and diplomatic intervention, and said 
that a campaign of education and publicity regarding 
foreign trade and enterprises was necessary. At the 
evening session the feature was an address by President 
Wilson. The most serious reference made was that the 
anti-trust laws should be amended so as to make it pos- 
sible for American business houses, particularly the 
small firms, to band together for common action in the 
export trade, provided they did not form combinations 
to exclude any manufacturer or exporter. 



In discussing trade expansion and the European war 
on Feb. 5, Edward A. Filene, Boston, recommended that 
business men should begin a national discussion of peace 
terms as a means of helping to end the European war, 
that banks should do more pioneer work for trade ex- 
pansion, that foreign trade contracts should be pro- 
tected by insurance and indemnity provisions and that 
the Chamber of Commerce should adopt a quality stamp 
for the goods of its members. Other papers and re- 
ports were of less interest to electric railways. 



Presentation of Brady Medals 

The ceremony in connection with the presentation of 
the Anthony N. Brady memorial medals for safety work 
on electric railways occurred at the annual meeting of 
the American Museum of Safety, Feb. 10. This meet- 
ing was held in the auditorium of the United Engineer- 
ing Societies' Building, New York, and four other med- 
als were presented and addresses were made on the work 
of the museum during the year. President Wilson sent 
a message to those at the meeting saying that he was 
very much interested in the effort made to conserve life 
and safeguard health by the museum. The dies for the 
medals are now being cut according to the accepted 
artist's sketch published on page 239 of the issue of 
Jan. 30, and the medals will be delivered in due course. 

The speech in connection with the presentation of the 
medals was made by Prof. F. R. Hutton, chairman, jury 
of award of museum medals. The gold medal was 
awarded to the Boston Elevated Railway, and the 
speech of acceptance was made by Gen. William A. Ban- 
croft, who said that he realized the honor conferred by 
the award and expressed the appreciation of the com- 
pany for it. Russell A. Sears of the legal department 
and Henry V. Neal of the mechanical department of the 
company, to whom were respectively awarded the silver 
and bronze replicas, were also present. In his presen- 
tation speech Prof. Hutton referred to the fact that the 
jury of awards had made honorable mention in its re- 
port of the Public Service Railway of New Jersey and 
the Northern Ohio Traction & Light Company. E. W. 
Heilig of the former company and E. A. Clinedist of 
the latter company were the representatives of those 
companies in attendance. 

At the same meeting the E. H. Harriman memorial 
medal, which is awarded to the steam railroads each 
year under very similar conditions to those covering the 
Brady medal and the electric railways, was presented 
to the New York Central Railroad. A. H. Smith, presi- 
dent of the company, received the medal for the com- 
pany. Mrs. Anthony N. Brady and Mrs. E. H. Harri- 
man were among those seated on the platform. 

Berlin Stadtbahn Will Test High-Tension 
Direct Current 

In the Elektrotechnische Zeitschrift for Dec. 24, 1914, 
Dr. Zehme states that the Prussian State Railways have 
decided to test high-tension d.c. motor car third-rail 
operation as well as single-phase equipment in connec- 
tion with the Berlin Stadtbahn electrification. The sum 
of $6,250,000 has already been granted by the Prussian 
Diet for this electrification. This change in plans is 
the result of the government's study of recent progre.s-i 
made in high-tension d.c. operation. 

The experiments will be conducted on the Wannsee- 
Stahnsdorf branch of the State Railways with a 1600_; 
volt third rail, four motor cars and six trailers. D| 
Zehme suggests that the experimental section, whic 
later would form a part of the electrified network, 
so equipped that the third-rail voltage could be raise 
later to, say, 3000. 



February 13, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



339 



Equipment and Its Maintenance 

Short Descriptions of Labor, Mechanical and Electrical 
Practices in Every Department of Electric Railroading 

(Contributions from the Men in the Field Are Solicited and Will be Paid for at Special Rates.) 



Fixed Squeegee for Vestibuled Cars 

HY A. R. JOHNSON, ASSISTANT TO SUPERINTENDENT OF 
KQUIPMENT THIRD AVENUE RAILWAY SYSTEM, NEW YORK 

In remodeling about 630 convertible cars to the pay- 
within type the Third Avenue Railway System, New 
York, realized that the removal of the bulkheads necessi- 
tated some means of keeping the vestibule sash free of 
rain, snow and ice with the least discomfort to the pas- 




two center vestibule posts. Where the straps project 
beyond the posts they are twisted, their ends being 
secured by means of two thumbscrews. Furthermore, 
springs are set between the straps and the posts to 
allow clearance between the sash and the straps while 
permitting close contact of the sash and rubber. The 
squeegee extends across the bottom vestibule sash, 
which is stationary, and close to the upper stile of the 
same in order to be out of the way. As the top center 
sash is lowered and then raised by the motorman, the 
outer side of the pane is swept by the rubber tongue so 
effectually that rain streaks and snow are readily 
cleaned off. 



Recording Progress in Construction of 
Cars and Assembly of Equipment 

BY NORMAN LITCHFIELD, M. E. 

The modern electric multiple-unit motor car is a 
highly complex machine requiring in its construction 
the completion of a number of processes at the works of 
the car body and truck builders, and also necessitating 
for its full equipment the assembling of multitudinous 
detail parts after the main body and truck structures 
are completed. It is often advantageous for the rail- 
way company to purchase various specialties such as 
doors, seats, etc., directly from the manufacturers in- 
stead of from the car builders, and if this course be 
followed then it is essential that these parts be deliv- 
ered to the car builders at a sufficiently early date to 
permit the prompt construction of the cars to proceed 
without interruption from lack of material. 

It is often impossible to place the order for these 
parts at an earlier date than that of the order for the 
car bodies themselves, and it becomes, therefore, a diffi- 
cult matter to keep track of the various items and to be 
able to ascertain quickly just what material is coming 
forward properly and what needs attention to insure its 
arrival in time. 

In the same manner parts may be bought separately 
for the trucks, such as wheels, axles, springs, etc., and 



FIXED SQUEEGEE FOR VESTIBULED CARS 

sengers and also of avoiding accidents from clouded 
sash. To attain this end a fixed window cleaner or 
squeegee was devised. This cleaner consists of two 
pieces of Vg-in. x %-in. strap iron with a strip of rubber 
clamped between them, the straps being bolted to the 



opnngis 
Axles 
Wheels 
Motor Tr. 

Curtains 
Seats 
Bodies 



^.Cotihop ' •^°"- ^ '^ 2^ '^^■*- ^ '^ ^2 ///a/r 6 15 22 I Apr. 6 15 22 

DATE OF ORDER 
JAM. I 

FIG. 1 — CO-ORDINATION OF PARTS DELIVERED FOR ASSEMBLY AT TRUCK AND CAR-BODY BUILDERS AND THEN SHIPPED 
TO RAILWAY. THE DIAGONAL LINES INDICATE THE TIME THAT THE MATERIAL IS IN TRANSIT 



1 ; 




1 1 










1 




[ 






^^ 


\ 




\ 












1 1 












\ 










\ 








"^ 


^\ 

















340 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 7 



they must reach the truck builders at specified dates. 
Furthermore, if the trucks are built by contractors 
other than the body builders and it is desired that the 
cars be shipped on their own wheels, then it must be seen 
to that they arrive at the car builders' works at the 
proper time. 

All of these matters involve considerable accounting, 
and numerous methods have been devised to prevent the 
tangles that arise when shipments of materials fail to 
meet the progress in construction. The problem be- 
comes more complicated when, as is often the case, the 
contract for the bodies and trucks is divided among sev- 
eral firms for. reasons of economy, convenience and quick 
delivery. 

Some railroads permit the car builders not only io 
build the body and truck structure but also to assemble 
the electrical and brake equipment on the car. Other 
roads prefer to send a force of their own men to the 
cat builders' works and do that work themselves. Still 
others have the car builders do only a very limited 
amount of strict equipping work and wait until the 
cars arrive at the railroad's own shops before applying 
the equipment. The deliveries of material to the com- 
pany's own shops then have to match with the progress 
in the construction of the cars at the builders and also 
with' the progress obtained in the equipment of the ckrk 
at th^ home point. 

As in all other matters, an orderly procedure, well 
and definitely recorded, has proved not only convenient 
but economical in this work, and the following method 
has proved its worth in a series of construction jobs of 
considerable magnitude. 

As scion as arrangements have been definitely com- 
pleted With the car-body builders, and an agreement has 
been reached in regard to the promised rate of delivery, 
a chart is made up as shown in Fig. 1. This chart gives 
a list of the parts to be furnished to the car and truck 
builder, and the approximate dates at which they should 
be delivered. This form, with the aid of the diagonal 
lines, shows at a glance at what date the wheels, etc., 
must be delivered to the truck builders in order that the 
trucks may be completed to be shipped in their turn to 
the body builders in time to meet their requirements. 
Requisitions are then made in manifold, giving the num- 
ber of each article required for the complete job, a de- 
scription of the material and reference to the detail blue- 
print number and specification number, and date of de- 
sired delivery. In addition to the copies forwarded to 
the purchasing and storekeeping departments, copies 
are furnished to the material clerk of the car equipment 
department, the engineer's office, the construction fore- 
man and the inspector at the works of the car builder. 

From these requisitions, file cards are made out and 
handled by the material clerk in a regular card index 
system, with the usual follow-up methods. The value 
of the card index for this work is very great, but on 
account of the great number of detail parts, each vary- 
ing in the number required per car, and made by num- 
erous different manufacturers, it is very difficult, almost 
impossible to be sure that some items have not fallen 
behind in their delivery and will cause a serious delay 
by their non-appearance. In other words, a compre- 
hensive, lucid picture is lacking. 

For this purpose the charts shown in Figs. 2 and 3 
have been devised. These charts have been in success- 
ful use for some years. Fig. 2 is a chart of progress 
at the works of the car and truck builders. This chart, 
made on tracing cloth, is held at the railroad company's 
home office, and its chief value lies in the fact that the 
unit used throughout is that of the complete car, and 
not the detail itself, i.e., if twenty y2-in. x 3y2-in. ma- 
chine bolts are required per car and up to date 200 have 
been delivered, then they are shown on the chart, not 



5Ptcinc 

ATIONMO 


DATE. 
BIDS 
SENT m 


NO. PER 
CAR 


REOUISIT 
!0M NO 


DATE Of 
ORDER 


MANUFAC- 
TURER 


ITEM 


5 


10 


15 


20 














A 


Cars Complete 




... 


'F' 


■Ty 


!■ 














in Trimming Oepf. 


.... 




+f 


■ 














• 'Nith Roof & Iron PainM 




ji 




■ 














- J"* Coat Varnish 


1 


i 


















- - 2" - 


1 




















.-,!'. 






















- Lettered 






■ 
















■ 2"' Coat Color 


















. l" ■■ - 
















Rubdown 
















Staining 
















- 5" Coat' Surface No. 5 
















. 2»d . . 














- /*r , „ 














- Puffy 














- mfhCoaf- Surface r/o, 2 














• - " Mefa/lic Primer 














- - Brake lagging Applied 














"Cement Floor Laid 














" Inside Finish Applied 














- in Finishing Dept 














« Sand Blasted 














' Side^RoofSheefimjRndat 














" Super Structured 














" Underframe 


ioe-A 


7-16-IZ 


IZ 


«•» 


5-1-15 


B 


Seats 






so 


" 


20 


SO 










501 


■ 


2 


- 


2-1-15 




Air Reservoir 




501 A 


7-26-11 


2 




- 




A ir Brake Cylinders 






a-50-12 


iStIs 


105 


" 




Door Hanger overhead Track 














C 


Motor Trucks Complete 
















80% 
















60% 




linn 
















407» 


















20% 


ttnI 
















10% 


m 




■4S'B 


7-16-12 


2 


8/ 


s-9-n 




Wfieels 




/l-C 


' 


; 


- 


S-6-12 




Axles 




5-15-15 


; 


215 


5-20-15 




Gears 


///•£■ 


9-ie-i 


2 


J 16 


425-I2 




Elliptic Springs 


'• 


" 


2 


116 


3-25-12 




Double Coil Springs 




II-IH2 


2 


144 


11-2512 




Journal Boxes 












D 


Trailer Trucks Complefe 






4SB 


7-16-12 


2 


SI 


1024-12 




Wtjeels 




4t-B 


" 


/ 


30 


S-SI2. 




Axles 




511' B 


9-«« 


2 


116 


3-/9-I2 




Single Coil Springs 




11-11-12 


2 


144 


11-25-12 




Journal Boxes 




■ 


■ 


■ 





ORDER 
NO. 


NO. PER 
CAR 


REQUISIT- 
ION MO. 


DATE OF 
ORDER 


MAHUTAC 
TURER 


ITEM 


h 


10 15 








344 




A 


Cars Completed 


■I""T 








•> 






60% 














60% 














40% 














20% 














10% 














" arrived at Rii. Shops 






2 


2^4 


i-a-li 




Motors 






2 




" 




Master Control 


1 






- 


" 




Reverse HantJIes 


1 






- 


- 




L ine Switches ' 








■• 


- 




Motor Resistances 


^^^^H 








" 


- 




Fuse Blocks &. Fuses 










- 




Main Fuses Oc Boxes 








- 


" 




Control Junction Boxes 








- 


- 




limit Switches 








.- 


» 




Floy/ Sockets 








• 


- 




Plow Socket Plugs 








- 


- 




Control Circuits, ft. Fuses 








233 


1-6-I5 


B 


Cut-out Cocks 








- 


" 




Compressors 








- 


- 




Suction Strainers 








• 


- 




Pump Gov. 








• 


* 




Safe tig Valims 








- 


- 




Brake Valves 








- 


- 




Brake Valve Handles 








- 


- 




Air Gages 








• 


- 




Fx/ioust Mufflers 








- 


- 




Drain Cocks ■ 








62 


4-12-15 




Cob Heaters 








- 


- 




Truss Plank Heaters 








- 


- 




Seat Heaters 








105 


2-1-15 




Pneu. Cylinders 








- 


- 




Plunger with rolled Pins 








- 


- 




Trip. Bars Complete 








M 


- 




Moval>le Brockets 








- 


- 




Pivots for Supp Angles 








- 


- 




Poor Shoe Cams 








- 


- 




Ratchet Foo t Switches 




11901 




567 


6 2$t5 




/fed Seal Batteries 




65SS 




180 


4-26-15 




Collapsible Shoes RH. 




•• 




- 


• 




- l.H 




45J2 




- 


5-15- 15 




Headlight Frames 




8464 




202 


5-17-15 




Coin Ifegister A Fare 80X3 




9920 




265 


5/7-/5 




Wheel Guards 




9902 




2// 


5-/6-I5 




" Hoods 




6645 




216 


4-5-15 




Motor Support Spring 




- 




- 


- 




» 




6726 




- 


- 




- " SpringBolt 








215 


3-20-/5 




Pinions 




9161 




216 


4-5-fl 




Washer No 1 


i 


- 




- 


" 




Washer No. 2 




^^H 





FIG. 2- 



-PROGRESS OF CARS, TRUCKS AND PAINTING ; 
PROGRESS IN DELIVERY TO HOME SHOPS 



FIG. 3 



February 13, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



341 



as 200 bolts but as twenty cars. Each day the reports 
of the inspector at the car builders' works as to the 
progress in the construction of the cars are noted on this 
chart and in conjunction therewith the progress in de- 
livery of material. For material which has been shipped 
but not yet arrived the chart is cross-hatched, and for 
material delivered and found O. K. it is filled in solid. 

Fig. 3 shows a similar chart for material delivered to 
the company's own shops and the rate of progress in 
turning out the cars complete for service. 

These charts permit the executive to see at a glance 
whether any items are falling behind. Thus in Fig. 3 it 
is evident that the delivery of heaters and batteries 
must be pushed if work is to proceed at the desired rate. 

The charts give a ready picture of the status of the 
work from the placing of the order for the car bodies 
to the placing of the complete cars in service. Together 
with an index card file system they have furnished a 
satisfactory solution of the equipment problem. 



They are held firmly in the rolls by 



FRONT 



Illuminated Train Number Box 

BY J. N. GRAHAM, MASTER MECHANIC ROCKFORD & INTER- 
URBAN RAILWAY, ROCKFORD, ILL. 

The accompanying sketch of our train number box 
shows one that is very easily made in any railway shop. 
The body of the box is cut from a single piece of tin 
or light galvanized iron. If cut according to measure- 
ments no trouble will be experienced. All lines marked 
A must be turned at 
a clean sharp angle, 
a machinist's vise 
being used for the 
purpose. After the 
bends are made the 
box is ready to sol- 
der together. The 
divisions that sepa- 
rate the numbers 
are made of two 
strips of tin 11/2 in. 
x 6 in. in size, sol- 
dered to the front of 
the box as shown in 
the sketch. The 
round hole shown is 
for an ordinary sign 
socket, preferably of 
Federal type. The 
rectangular hole, 3 
in. XAV2 in. in size, 

is for the door on the outside of the box. Two U-shaped 
slides are soldered to the box to hold the door in place. 
This door is made from a piece of tin or iron and has 
a small loop soldered thereto for convenient removal. 
The door gives access to the box when it is necessary 
to replace the lamp. 

The number strips are made of painter's white mus- 
hn placed against a black background. These num- 
bers run from 1 to 9 and 0. One strip is furnished 
with an E to designate extra trains. All strips are also 
provided with a black blank to be used when fewer than 
three numbers are needed. These number strips are 
glued at the ends to 1/2-in. x 6-in. wooden rolls. These 
rolls have a i/4-in. hole through the center through 
which the operating rod passes. For such operating 
rods we use trip rods from GE ML-2 circuit-breakers. 
However, a piece of l^-in. round iron will answer the 
purpose if provided with some sort of a knob with 
which to turn it. The rods pass through the small 
holes shown in the sketch and through the hole in the 




PATTERN FOR CUTTING OUT TRAIN 
NUMBER BOX 



wooden rolls, 
friction. 

The boxes are placed in the center front window 
of the car and are supported by iron or brass brackets 




TRAIN NUMBER BOX 

screwed to the sash. In wiring, enough slack is left 
so that the motorman can lift the box out of the brack- 
ets while changing the numbers. The light can be 
wired either in series with one of the car circuits or 
with the marker and classification light circuit. 



Voltmeter Measurements of Direct 
Current 

BY G. H. MCKELWAY, DISTRIBUTION ENGINEER BROOKLYN 
RAPID TRANSIT SYSTEM 

Practically all engineers are familiar with the use of 
a voltmeter for determining current in a wire from 
voltage drop, but few of them have tables that will give 
them quickly and easily a statement of the amount of 
current m the wire causing the drop found. Generally, 
after the measurement has been made, it is necessary to 
look up m a table the resistance per 1000 ft. of the size 
of wire upon which the measurements have been taken 
and then calculate from that the amount of current 

Much time will be saved by using tables which give 
the number of amperes in each size of wire correspond- 
ing with a drop of 1 millivolt over any specified length 
A table such as the following is a great help. 

Amperes per Millivolt 

•Number of Feet 



Size of Copper Wire 1 

5,000,000 circ. mils 476 

2,500,000 circ. mils 2380 

2,000,000 circ. mils 190 4 



1,500,000 circ. mils ' 1427 

1,000,000 circ. mils 95.2 



2 
268.0 
134.0 

95.2 
71.4 

.500,000 circ miis: '. '. '. '. '. 47.6 tl'.l 

No. 0000 20.1 iSo 

No. 000 16.0 8 

No. 00 12.7 6:4 

S°- ? 10.1 5.0 

No. 1 7.9 40 

No. 1 6.3 3.2 

No. 3 5.0 2.5 

No. 4 4.0 2.0 

No. 6 2.5 1.2 

No. 8 1.6 0.8 

No. 10 1.0 0.5 



3 


4 


5 


158.6 


134.0 


95.2 


79.3 


67.0 


47.6 


63.4 


47.6 


38.0 


47.6 


35.7 


28.5 


31.7 


23.8 


19.0 


15.9 


11.9 


9.5 


6.7 


5.0 


4.0 


5.3 


4.0 


3.2 


4.2 


3.2 


2.6 


3.4 


2.5 


2.0 


2.7 


2.0 


1.6 


2.1 


1.6 


1.3 


1.7 


1.2 


1.0 


1.3 


1.0 


0.8 


0.8 


0.6 


0.5 


0.5 


0.4 


0.3 


0.3 


0.25 


0.2 



An even quicker method is to measure off different 
lengths on different sizes of wire and so arrange these 
lengths that the current in the wire can be read off 
either directly from the indications of the millivoltmeter 
or with a constant of 100, 10, 1 or 0.1. This will avoid 
all figuring after the meter reading has been obtained. 





Copp 

circ. 
circ. 
circ. 
circ. 
circ. 
circ. 


er Wire 
mils. . . 


Lbngth of 


Wire 


tant- 

] 
Ft. 

95 
47 
20 
16 
16 
12 

7 

6 

5 

4 

2 

1 

1 


la 1 




1?^ - 

4 
6 2 




Size of 
5,000,000 


100 

Ft. In. 

4 9 


10 
Ft. In. 
47 7 
23 9% 
19 91^ 
14 -SVi 

9 6% 

4 9 

2 

1 7 

1 7 

1 3% 


0.1 
5^. In 


2,500,000 




2 4 V. 




2,000,000 


mils. . . 


::: i n 


1,500,000 




1 6 


1,000,000 
500,000 
No. 0000 
No. 000. 
No. 00.. 


mils. . . 
mils. . . 




No. . . . 








No. 1 . . . 
No. 2 . . . 








r9 '6 

>3 



5 

6 



No. 3 . . . 
No. 4 . . . 
No. 6... 








No. 8 . . . 
No, 10... 









342 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 7 



Some objection may be made that the measurements 
just given are not close enough for very fine work, but 
they are close enough for anything required by engi- 
neers in the field. When it is remembered that i/4 in. 
in 5 ft. is within 0.5 per cent of the total distance few 
will dispute that the measurements are close enough for 
practical purposes and as close as can be readily meas- 
ured on a wire. Even if the measurements could be 
made more exact it would be unnecessary, for with the 
fluctuating current in railway circuits any reading even 
approximating 0.5 per cent would be very close. For the 
reasons given, no correction has been attempted to allow 
for the change in the resistance of the conductor with 
varying temperature, the values given being correct for 
about 68 deg. Fahr. 



Bridge and Building Inspection Report 
Forms 

Rather unusual and extensive inspection report forms 
have been devised by the maintenance of way depart- 
ment of the Chicago, Ottawa & Peoria Railway, Ottawa, 
111. A feature of these reports is that the same form 
serves for both the inspector's record and the depart- 
ment record. For example, the bridge and building in- 
spectors are furnished with a loose-leaf binder, 5^/2 in. 
wide X 14 in. long, which may be slipped into a work- 
coat pocket. On this form the inspector records infor- 
mation as required and indicated in a reproduction of 
the form shown. 

For the convenience of the men, a complete list of 
abbreviations is furnished at the bottom of each report 
form so that the inspector will be able to supply all the 
data required in the space allotted for it. In order that 
the report record, which is written in pencil, will be 
legible when it reaches the department office to be trans- 
cribed, each inspector is supplied with a 2-H pencil 
which is hard enough to prevent the writing from be- 
coming unreadable. 

Thorough inspections of bridges and buildings are 
made twice a year, in the spring to determine that no 
more material than was required at the previous fall in- 
spection is necessary, and in the fall to determine the 
safety of the structure for winter operation, as well as 
to estimate what new material will be necessary for re- 
pairs for the following year. In addition to these in- 
spections track foremen are required to inspect all 



Siphon Motor Lubrication at Budapest 

In 1908 the Budapest, Hungary, Railway installed on 
a number of its railway motors for experimental use a 
siphon lubricator invented by Joseph Zsarko, its chief 
engineer. The results under great variations of service 
and temperature were so satisfactory that the railway 
equipped all of its cars in the following year. Most of 
the motors are of the Westinghouse or Allgemeine types, 
made originally for grease lubrication. For this system 
the company substituted cast-iron cups equipped with 
the new lubricating device as illustrated. 

This lubricator consists of a suction pipe in which a 






I! 



DETAIL AND GENERAL VIEWS OF SIPHON LUBRICATOR 

copper wire is inserted to increase the surface of con- 
tact for the transmitted oil ; thereby clogging is practi- 
cally obviated. The oil is conducted to the point of use 
in a uniform degree, the rate of flow being fixed in 
advance by selecting the proper diameter of pipe and 
wire. 

To start the lubricator, water is first drawn through 



Bridge Inspection Report 



CHICAGO. OTTAWA & PEORIA RAILWAY 



Bridge No. 


Date 
Erected 


Kind of Bridge 
or Culvert 


No. of Lengtfi of 
Spans Spans 


Size of Pipe 

Total 1 or Culvert. 

Length , Width First, 

I then Height 


Approximate 

Drainage 

Area 


Date 
Inspected 


Condition of Bridge 
and Description of 
Work to be Done 


Material Required 


Remarks 
































































1 






















! 































BRIDGE INSPECTION REPORT OF THE CHICAGO, OTTAWA & PEORIA RAILWAY 



bridges and culverts within their territories and report 
any unsafe or unusual condition upon its discovery. As 
a check against this inspection by the track foreman, 
the foreman of bridges and buildings inspects all tim- 
ber bridges once each month, following which all de- 
fects needing immediate repairs are cared for promptly. 
In connection with each way and structure inspec- 
tion a list of the material needed is compiled by the 
foreman of the way department so that repairs may 
be made promptly and in accordance with his ideas as 
to what is needed. 



the pipe, after which the shorter branch is dipped in 
the oil. The pipe will then fill with oil automatically and 
be ready for use with the expulsion of the water. The 
pipes can be maintained in perfect condition by blowing 
them out about once every three months. It is asserted 
that the saving in lubrication as compared with the 
grease is 75 per cent, and 50 per cent as compared with 
wick and oil lubrication. This lubricating system has 
given no trouble from freezing because the heat coi 
ducted from the bearing by way of the brass sucti 
pipe actually will melt frozen oil at a greater rate th; 



'Mi 

1 



February 13, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



343 



is required for lubrication. The representative for the 
inventor in this country is Joseph Gelbert, who is in the 
way and structure department of the Brooklyn Rapid 
Transit System. 



Series Trip for High-Voltage Oil Switches 

Low-voltage current is usually employed to trip high- 
voltage automatic oil switches on the occurrence of 
abnormal conditions against which the automatic fea- 
tures are intended to guard. Electrically-operated 
switches are usually tripped by direct current; and for 
tripping hand-operated switches, alternating current is 
generally used. In many cases, however, neither low 
voltage direct current nor alternating current is conven- 
iently or cheaply available; and then, automatic protec- 
tion is secured by the aid of a high-voltage series trip. 

For this service, the General Electric Company has 
developed an arrangement representing considerable 




TRIPLE-POLE SINGLE-THROW 45,000-VOLT OIL SWITCH WITH 
TRIPLE-POLE TIME-LIMIT SERIES TRIP 

improvement on types of high-voltage series tripping 
devices heretofore in use. The new features are: ac- 
cessibility of the working parts for inspection ; cleaning 
or adjustment while in service without danger; calibra- 
tion at the oil switch itself, and not at the insulator 
supporting the series tripping solenoid; and the use 
of a new type of solenoid, which consists of but a few 
simple and rugged parts that need practically no atten- 
tion whatever after installation. 

The solenoid plunger is connected to the tripping 
mechanism of the oil switch by a wooden rod. Calibra- 
tion, namely, change in current tripping values, is 
accomplished by a movable weight located near to the 
operating mechanism of the switch at a considerable 
distance from the high voltage current. This type of 
series trip is furnished for instantaneous or inverse 
time-limit operation. Time delay is obtained by means 
of a dashpot mounted on the tripping mechanism at 
the switch. 



New Trolley Retrievers and Catches 

The New Haven Trolley Supply Company, New 
Haven, Conn., is just placing on the market the "Sterl- 
ing Universal" trolley retriever, and the "Sterling" 
trolley catcher. These devices contain a number of 
novel features. For example, only one weight retriev- 
ing spring is used in the trolley retriever. This spring 




EXTERIOR VIEW OF TROLLEY RETRIEVER 

can be adjusted to meet any tension of trolley pole de- 
sired, thereby making it unnecessary to carry in stock 
various sizes of retrieving springs. Action of the re- 
trieving spring does not affect the service spring. It 
is asserted that these machines positively will prevent 
skipping or "walking up" of the pole after it leaves the 
wire. They contain very little mechanism, and the few 
parts are strong and simple. Repairs can be made with- 
out the use of tools other than a wrench with which to 
remove the case. The company absolutely guarantees 
for a period of five years all parts except springs. The 
springs, nevertheless, are said to be the best obtainable, 
and were designed specially for the characters of service 
required. Where desired, the company can supply ma- 
chines that are interchangeable with present equipment. 



Third-Rail Cable End Bell 

A cable end bell for use in connection with feeders 
supplying third rails has recently been developed and 
placed on the market by the Electrical Engineers Equip- 
ment Company, Chicago, 111. The desire for more ade- 
quate protection for this class of feeders by a large 




THIRD-RAIL CABLE END BELL 

electric railway in the West prompted the development. 
The bell is so constructed that it can be mounted upon 
any size of iron pipe or fiber conduit, which is used 
in conducting the feeder cable. In case a lead-covered 
cable is used for the feeder, the lead sheath is cut 
away for a short distance from the end. The lead is 
then belled out so as to make a tight fit into the patented 
grounding clamp with which all of this company's end 



344 ELECTRIC 

bells are equipped. The cable insulation is also cut 
away a few inches, depending upon the size, and a split 
tinned copper sleeve is slipped over the bare end. A 
similar sleeve is placed over the bare end of the rail 
cable which is introduced into the bell through a por- 
celain bushing. The two cables are then bolted rigidly 
together by means of a copper angle connector which 
fits over the copper sleeves. The bell can be used in 
connection with braided as well as lead-covered cables. 
This construction is shown in the accompanying cuts. 

The lower portion of the bell is then filled with a 
compound completely sealing the cable, and the cover is 
put in place. This cover has been designed with an 
extension over the porcelain bushing to form a water- 
shed which prevents moisture from entering the bell. 
By removing the cover and loosening the angle con- 
nectors the bell is readily made detachable. The com- 
pleted bell forms a safe, simple and efficient means of 
protecting this class of feeders. 

While designed originally to meet the specifications 
of one railway a number of other third-rail systems 
are now using the same equipment. 



RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[VOL. XLV, No. 7 



Modern Gongs 

One of the two accompanying cuts shows a combina- 
tion rotary multiple ringing and single stroke foot gong 
made by G. C. Reiter, Canton, Ohio. This gong gives 
forth a loud, clear ring which can be varied from a single 




COMBINATION ROTARY MULTIPLE RINGING AND SINGLE- 
STROKE FOOT GONG 

tap to a continuous alarm. No springs are used. The 
gong itself is made of a most resonant bell steel, the 
hanger and knocker wheel are of cast iron and the lugs. 




stroke foot or hood gongs and single-tap inside striking 
gongs. Although it is not generally known, this manu- 
facturer not only makes gongs for every purpose but 
supplies a large number of those sold by the leading 
supply houses and car builders. These gongs are also 
used in large numbers by foreign tramways. 



SINGLE-TAP FOOT GONG 

which are electrically welded to the gong, are of steel. 
The mechanism inside the gong includes a centrifugal 
internal gear connected to a pinion whose ratchets en- 
gage with teeth on the rocker arm. A black japan finish 
is usually employed to prevent oxidation, etc. Mr. Reiter 
also supplies gongs of simpler form, such as single- 



Ball-Bearings on Storage-Battery Cars 

Arthur V. Farr, M. E., who is with the S. K. F. 
Ball Bearing Company, New York, has recently pre- 
pared the following summary of the value of ball bear- 
ings in electric railway service: 

The necessity for extreme accuracy in energy con- 
sumption has made the builders of storage-battery cars 
lead in the use of anti-friction bearings for journal 
boxes and motors. Every tie-up required for charging 
or boosting and every percentage increase in the coeffi- 
cient of friction of the bearings limits directly the ap- 
plication of this type of car. 

A storage battery of given ampere-hour capacity is 
able to take the car over a definite schedule. The 
amount of the starting and tractive efforts determines, 
among other factors, the limitations of this schedule. 
The use of ball bearings has reduced the starting effort 
upward of 50 per cent, which makes possible either 
quicker acceleration, using the same size motor, or 
greater mileage on the one charge, using a smaller 




BALL-BEARING HEADS FOR A 65-HP RAILWAY MOTOR 



1 — Motor shaft 

2 — Bearing head 

3 — Outer ball race 

4 — Balls and ball retainer 

5 — Inner ball race 

6 — Oil retaining grooves 



7 — Lubricant chamber 

8 — Tap for lubricant supply 

9 — Housing cap 

10 — Lock-nut to hold inner race 

11 — Driving pinion 

12 — -Pinion casing 



motor. Ball bearings in this way increase the sphere 
of application of accumulator cars, improving the run- 
ning schedule and decreasing the number and duration 
of charging periods. 

The reduced starting effort directly affects the bat- 
tery characteristics. Battery efficiencies vary widely, 
depending upon the rate at which the battery is charged 
and discharged, and the extent to which the discharge 
has been carried when the charge is begun. High 
rates of discharge lower the efficiency, consequently 
types of axle bearings which necessitate heavy starting 
effort put a severe handicap on the storage-battery car. 

Ball bearings, besides decreasing the starting effort, 
permit the car to coast farther than where plain bear- 
ings are used. This coasting feature is so noticeable 
that it is possible to take advantage of even the slight- 
est inclines. On the whole, actual tests have shown that 
an increase of 10 per cent in mileage may be expected 
from the use of ball bearings. 

Almost, if not quite, as important to the car main- 
tenance department is the saving in upkeep and inspec- 
tion which results from the use of ball bearings. The 
saving in maintenance charges due to the freedom from 
hot journals, frequent lubricant renewals, repairs, etc.. 



February 13, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



345 



is held to be from 35 per cent to 70 per cent. This 
signiiicant saving is due to the fact that where ball 
bearings are properly mounted they do not require 
adjustment or repairs and are free from the intrusion 
of dirt and grit. 

The saving in the lubricant used on the car journals is 
about 85 per cent. The ball-bearing journals can be 
sealed so that there is no leakage out of the journal 
box, and it is not necessary to lubricate the bearings 
more often than once in three months. 

The reason for the reduced friction of ball bearings 
is that they substitute rolling action for the rubbing 




BALL-EEARING JOURNAL BOX FOR STANDARD 0-50 TRUCK — 
RADIAL LOAD ON EACH JOURNAL 6500 LB. 

friction of plain bearings. With bearings that are self- 
aligning, binding or wedging action of the balls is 
impossible. Also, bearings with the double row of balls 
permit the use of twice as many balls per bearing to 
carry the load and consequently reduce the load carried 
by each ball. 

Ball bearings on the driving motors increase the 
life of the driving gears by maintaining the gsar center 




CAMBRIA & INDIANA RAILROAD BALL-BEARING AXLES- 
CAR WEIGHT 59,100 LB. TRUCKS, BRILL 69-E 

distances. To prevent rapid wear, gears must mesh 
properly. When plain motor bearings wear or the 
armature shaft wears, the entire driving strain is taken 
by the inside corners of the driving teeth, and rapid 
wear with frequent failure of teeth results. Ball bear- 
ings minimize bearing wear and eliminate shaft wear, 
keeping the gears properly in mesh. 

The substitution of the rolling of ball bearings for 
the rubbing action of plain bearings reduces the bear- 
ing wear to an amount that is so small that it cannot 
be measured and consequently the armature air gap is 



maintained constant. This eliminates the danger of the 
armature falling on to the pole pieces and causing 
costly repairs. In fact, a prime cause of motor repairs 
is thus eliminated. Cars in the repair shop for motor 
trouble are generally there because of worn bearings, 
worn-out armatures, burnt-out armatures, etc., due 
directly to the fact that the plain bearings have worn 
down. 



Editor Eichel on Conditions in Germany 

In a personal letter to a member of the editorial staff 
of the Electric Eailway Journal, Eugen Eichel, edi- 
tor of Elektrische Kraftbetriebe und Bahnen has some 
interesting things to say on conditions in Germany at 
this time, particularly with regard to railway and elec- 
trical affairs. 

Mr. Eichel says that the war has led to a relaxation 
in the police rules governing passengers standing in 
electric railway cars, so that it is now quite common to 
see a car carrying as many passengers as it will hold. 
Consequently, the railways are operating at a lower 
service cost than in times of peace. 

A number of autobuses and automobiles are still run- 
ning in Berlin with the consent of the war department, 
although rubber tires and gasoline are extremely costly. 
In many cases a mixture of gasoline and wood alcohol 
is used, as the latter is abundant in Germany. Gaso- 
line is also manufactured largely in Germany as a by- 
product of the coal-tar industry, and as both tar and 
coal are at hand in large quantities the question of fuel 
is not a pressing one. 

Naturally the war offers a very favorable opportunity 
for the exploitation of electric lighting and electric 
vehicles, since both gasoline and petroleum have risen 
in price very much. The military authorities who first 
installed petroleum lighting for barracks, military hos- 
pitals, encampments and prisoners' quarters prefer 
electricity wherever it is possible to make connections 
with existing central stations or transmission systems. 
The use of electricity is particularly valuable for prison 
camps because the wiring and lamps can be so ar- 
ranged that the turn of a switch will flood any sus- 
picious area with light. In connection with the prison 
camps, Mr. Eichel writes that large numbers of illiter- 
ate Russian prisoners are being taught to read and 
write. 

The large electrical companies of Germany have done 
praiseworthy service in fitting out military hospitals 
with electrical apparatus for sterilizing, cooking, x-ray 
and electro-therapeutical purposes. The Siemens- 
Schuckert Company, in particular, has equipped part 
of its new main building as a hospital with 400 to 
500 cots, including an all-electric kitchen. 



War Affects Buenos Aires Underground 

The Compagnie Generale de Tramways de Buenos 
Aires of Brussels reports that the first section of the 
Anglo-Argentine Tramways in Buenos Aires was 
opened for traffic in December, 1913, the length being 
4.2 miles. During the first nine months of operation 
the average receipts, if applied to a whole year, would 
amount to about $368,000 per mile per anuum, as 
compared with $249,600 in Paris, $179,200 in London 
and $377,600 per mile in New York. As a consequence 
of the financial crisis in Argentina the construction of 
the second underground section has been indefinitely 
postponed, although the hope is expressed that an ex- 
tension of time will be granted by the authorities. The 
European war has reacted unfavorably on Argentina 
and a reduction in the operation of the tramways is 
held in prospect. 



346 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[VOL. XLV, No. 7 



News of Electric Railways 



NEW YORK COMMISSION INVESTIGATION 

Summary of Testimony of Commissioners McCall and Wood 
Before Legislative Committee 

Edward E. McCall, chairman of the Public Service Com- 
mission of the First District of New York, was the witness 
before the legislative investigating committee on Feb. 4. 
He was examined first as to the methods and scope of the 
commission. Mr. McCall explained that he took the posi- 
tion because he believed a crisis had arisen in the subway 
contract situation. The commission was divided two to two 
over the dual system now well under way. He cast the 
deciding vote, after considering the matter five weeks. 
Five commissioners were necessary to the work of the com- 
mission. Colonel Hayward, counsel for the committee, re- 
cited the record of work outside of the commission on which 
Mr. McCall had been engaged during his early connection 
with the commission, to show that Mr. McCall had spent 
fifty-seven days in court or sitting as a referee and had 
missed nine stated meetings of the commission. Mr. Mc- 
Call expressed the opinion that the jurisdiction of the com- 
mission should be extended so as to take in more of the 
Long Island Railroad and all Westchester County. He 
favored the first district commission looking after the New 
York telephones. He did not believe that any of the tran- 
sit managers were disregarding the people's interests. He 
did not favor turning over the supervision of the construc- 
tion of the new rapid transit lines to the Board of Estimate. 

At the hearing on Feb. 5 Mr. McCall said that he was 
familiar with the conditions at the Brooklyn Bridge in rush 
hours and that he often used the subway. The fleet of 
automobiles of the commission consisted of five autos and 
two trucks. Colonel Hayward read into the record the 
chauffeur's slips. Mr. McCall explained that he was accus- 
tomed after his work at the office to ride in the commission's 
car toward his country home until he was met by his own 
and could transfer to it. All the rides were taken for the 
public service. His experience showed that a commissioner 
could not possibly practice law. He found that if he tried 
to do so he would break down. Mr. McCall considered that 
the civil remedies were adequate for the commission's pur- 
pose. He did not believe it was ever intended that the 
commissioners should seek an indictment for misdemeanor 
because a train was five minutes late or twcity-five people 
were standing in one place for ten minutes. He referred the 
committee to Commissioners Maltbie and Williams when the 
question of security issues was brought up. 

Robert Colgate Wood, the member of the Public Service 
Commission appointed from the Bronx about eight months 
ago by Governor Glynn, was the witness on Feb. 6. He had 
been solicited to take the appointment. He was not a law- 
yer and had had no administrative experience except as a 
corporation director and in contract work. His lack of 
exact knowledge of the commission law he attributed to 
his short term of service with the commission. He con- 
sulted counsel for the commission in regard to all matters 
concerning the law. He had been active in public service 
corporation work only with the New York City Interbor- 
ough Company and the Lincoln Gas Company, but retired 
from the former seven years ago. This experience had 
been valuable to him in his commission work. The property 
of the New York City Interborough Company was now in- 
cluded in the system of the Third Avenue Railroad. Mr. 
Wood had two telephones to his office in the commission, one 
connected through the local switchboard in the commission 
office and one, a personal wire, connected with the telephone 
central at headquarters. Mr. Wood did not know whether 
other commissioners had similar unlisted wires. He under- 
.stood, however, that there had always been two wires con- 
necting his ofl!ice. In this connection Senator Foley, the 
Tammany member of the investigating committee, explained 
that everybody in public service had a private wire. The 
testimony showed that Mr. Wood had paid personally for his 
private wire. 

The hearings were resunied on Feb. 10. 

In consequence of the attention that thk legislative com- 



mittee has devoted to the regulatory side of the commis- 
sion's functions as apart from its work in providing for the 
dual subway system, the commission has caused to be issued 
a statement of what it has accomplished in the way of regu- 
lating public utilities since its creation on July 1, 1907. 



BAY STATE ARBITRATION HEARINGS 

Testimony by Prof. Irving Fisher of Yale University in 
regard to the cost of living was the feature of the Bay 
State Street Railway arbitration at Boston during the week. 
In general Professor Fisher's evidence dealt with the rela- 
tion between the cost of living and the shrinking value of 
the dollar, which topic is discussed at length in Professor 
Fisher's book, "Why the Dollar Is Shrinking," reviewed in 
the Electric Railway Journal of Jan. 30, 1915, page 264. 
Under cross-examination by Attorney James M. Swift, 
counsel of the company. Professor Fisher said that the ex- 
pense of increasing the wages of employees should be laid 
upon the passengers. He said in conclusion: "It seems to me 
that the true solution for this difficulty into which the world 
is put by the rising cost of living and the shrinkage of the 
dollar, is for the railroads to raise their rates. That course 
was granted to a limited degree for the steam railroads 
against opposition with which I have no sympathy. I think 
it may well be true that the electric roads will come to 
the same necessity of raising their rates over the fixed 5- 
cent fare, to a 6-cent or a 7-cent fare, or a fare that 
changes from time to time like other prices in the com- 
munity. This depreciation of gold necessitates the raising 
of all prices to correspond." 

Professor Fisher held that almost all the large public 
problems of the day were due to the fact that the prices 
of commodities, labor, and of public service do not move 
together. He advanced the opinion that in reality the ad- 
justment was not taken out of the passenger, because he 
got higher wages and income himself. In response to an 
inquiry by Chairman Pelletier, the witness said that the 
company should increase wages first and then apply to the 
Public Service Commission for permission to establish 
higher rates of fare, along the lines followed in the Mid- 
dlesex & Boston Street Railway case, which offered an ex- 
cellent precedent. 



FRANCHISE UPHELD 

Supreme Court of Minnesota Decides in Favor of the Duluth 
Street Railway 

An important decision concerning the validity of the fran- 
chises of the Duluth (Minn.) Street Railway was rendered 
recently by the Supreme Court of Minnesota. The case was 
brought before the court on quo warranto proceedings by the 
Attorney-General of the State and was tried first in the Dis- 
trict Court, where a decision was rendered in favor of the 
company on May 23, 1914. The contention of the State was 
that the original franchise of the company, granted in 1881, 
provided that the company should build 1 mile of street rail- 
way within one year of the date of the grant; that while the 
company did lay such a mile of track, the line was not 
equipped and put in operation until some months later after 
it had been reconstructed; that consequently the terms of 
the franchise had not been complied with, and since then the 
company had been operating on the street merely on suf- 
ferance and not by virtue of its contract. The company's 
claim was briefly that the State and the city, after thirty 
years' acquiescence and recognition of the franchise, was 
now estopped from raising any question on its validity. 

In the trial in the lower court it was brought out that 
since the railway had been in operation, various actions had 
been brought against the company by the city and State on 
taxation and other matters, and that during this time there 
had been no claim, with one exception, which was not mate- 
rial, that the company was not occupying the streets by vir- 
tue of its franchise, and that the city had levied taxes on the 
company in which the franchise was assessed at a large sui.o. 
It was also shown that the company had sold securities to 



February 13, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



347 



the public, based on the validity of the franchise, that these 
securities had been purchased in good faith and that the 
company had been encouraged to do this because the city 
during this long period of time had never disputed the valid- 
ity of the franchise. In view of these facts the court held 
that even had there been any failure to meet the terms of 
the franchise, action now was barred by the statute of limi- 
tations. 

The court did not deny that a statute may create a self- 
executing forfeiture, but it held that none of the cases cited 
where such self-execution was held to have occurred 
contained facts especially like the case in question. The 
court held that the intent of the Legislature in the original 
grant was to have a railway built, but that the terms on 
which it should be built were largely of local concern. This 
was shown by the fact that the city could require exten- 
sions. Moreover, the city in 1882 had consented by formal 
resolution to a postponement of operation, and the railway 
was in operation within the time fixed by this last resolu- 
tion. 

The court finally held that as the franchises of the com- 
pany were granted in 1881 for a period of fifty years, they 
would not terminate until 1931. 



LEGISLATION IN INTEREST OF TORONTO 

The Council of Toronto, Ont., has decided to oppose the 
application of the Metropolitan Radial Railway for power 
to lay double tracks on Yonge Street within the city limits; 
to apply to the Legislature for a declaratory act restoring 
the order of the Ontario courts declaring the Toronto 
Suburban Railway was liable to restore pavements as well 
as to repair, and to give the same definition to the word 
"tracks" as given by the courts; to seek an order for the 
cancellation of the company's franchise within the city lim- 
its for having refused to carry out the provisions of the 
agreement, and to give the city power to take over the 
system on similar terms to which it took over the Mimico 
& Scarboro divisions of the York Radial. A special com- 
mittee has been appointed to confer with representatives 
of the Harbor Board and the Provincial Hydro-Electric 
Power Commission and consider and report upon a plan for 
a rapid transit system for the city and for the entrance 
of the radial lines. It was also decided to apply for an act 
declaring that the agreement between the city and the 
Toronto Railway means that the company is compelled to 
extend its tracks and to operate a service within the limits 
of the city as they may exist at any time, and not solely 
within the old limits of the city; for the confirmation of 
the Barnes report suggesting the company spend $2,950,000 
on new cars and extensions; for an amendment to the assess- 
ment act to provide for the assessment of railway rolling 
stock, and for the imposition of a percentage tax on capital 
stock of the railway companies. The Mayor's proposal that 
application be made to the Ontario Railway Board for an 
order compelling the Metropolitan Railway to reduce its 
fares within the city limits was referred back to the Board 
of Control, as was his suggestion that power should be 
sought to enable the city to purchase and operate a system 
of motor busses. 

At a joint meeting of the members of the City Council 
of Toronto, the Harbor Commissioners and Sir Adam Beck, 
representing the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of On- 
tario, on Feb. 4, it was decided that the engineers and 
; legal advisers of the three bodies should confer on the 
i legal and engineering aspects of the transportation situa- 
tion and that the engineers should prepare a general scheme 
I for a rapid transit system for the city and suburbs, em- 
J bracing a common entrance for the radial lines on the north, 
west and east of the city. Sir Adam Beck said the Govern- 
ment intended to oppose the granting of new franchises 
to electric companies and refuse an extension of time for 
construction to those who had obtained franchises in the 
past. The Provincial Hydro-Electric contemplated the con- 
struction of 1600 miles of radials in the province, and the 
success of the system depended upon being able to obtain 
an entrance into Toronto, the hub of the system. As soon 
as the engineers have prepared the general scheme for 
the radial railways it will be submitted to the conference, 
the object being to advance the project so that it may be 
submitted to the people at the next municipal elections. 



INDIANA LEGISLATURE 

The following new bills have been introduced in the House: 
a bill providing that the officers of all incorporated compa- 
nies in the State shall send annually to the stockholders a 
report of the business transacted; a bill providing that news- 
papers may contract with railroads for advertising, taking 
mileage or transportation in payment for the same; a bill 
providing for the regulation of labor for hire, for the adjust- 
ment of all controversies arising therefrom by arbitration, 
and that all labor for hire shall be "compensated on a truly 
competitive basis." 

The following bills have been killed in the House: House 
bill 554 of the 1913 session, which was vetoed by the Gov- 
ernor after the Legislature adjourned in March, 1913, pro- 
viding that railroad engineers be permitted to run their 
trains across electric railway tracks without stopping; bill 
for amendment providing that towns of 500 population can 
order the installation of protective signal devices or flagmen 
at railroad crossings; bill providing for installation of suita- 
ble signs at railroad crossings, cost to be borne between 
township and companies; bill providing that electric rail- 
ways shall pave between the tracks with the same material 
that is used for the remainder of the street. 

A bill has been passed by the House providing that steam 
and electric railways shall maintain station flagmen or auto- 
matic signal devices at all crossings where the view is ob- 
structed, provided a petition for such man or device is pre- 
sented by five freeholders. 

The following new bills have been introduced in the Sen- 
ate: a bill providing certain regulations for the ventilation 
of street and interurban cars and passenger stations; a bill 
providing that where a public utility does an interstate busi- 
ness the rates charged in Indiana shall be no greater than 
the rates charged by the utility in another State; a bill pro- 
viding for a uniform bill of lading to be used by all ship- 
pers; a bill making uniform the law in regard to transfer of 
stocks of corporations; a bill making it unlawful for a pub- 
lic service corporation to supply service to another State un- 
less a schedule of rates charged in the foreign State shall 
first have been filed with the Public Service Commission of 
Indiana; a bill prohibiting the payment of dividends by cor- 
porations unless the dividends have been actually earned; a 
bill prohibiting any person from acting as a director in any 
corporation unless he is a bona fide stockholder in such cor- 
poration; a bill giving the Public Service Commission power 
to order the separation of grade crossings in cities of 20,000 
population or less. 

■The bill to prevent public utilities from diverting funds or 
assets after an examination of the property of the company 
has been ordered by the Public Service Commission has 
passed the Senate. 

STORM IN ONTARIO 

The whole Province of Ontario was in the grip of the 
storm king on Feb. 2. In one of the worst gales which has 
swept over the province during the past decade, Toronto 
was cut off entirely from railway communication for more 
than eight hours. The storm paralyzed radial traffic in and 
out of Toronto. During the morning all traffic was practi- 
cally at a standstill, and only the snowplows were able to 
make headway against the gale. These were of little 
practical use, however, as the wind swept the drifts over 
the tracks again. The Toronto Railway ran cars without 
any attempt to keep to the schedule, and residents of the 
eastern and western sections were without service for 
more than three hours. About noon, however, the street 
railway officials succeeded in bringing about the opening of 
all lines in the city. 

The Gait, Preston & Hespeler Railway ran sweepers all 
night in Gait so as to keep the line open. The service was 
irregular. Street railway service in Guelph has practi- 
cally been out of business since Jan. 30. The electric rail- 
way service between Woodstock and Ingersoll was com- 
pletely tied up. The Hamilton Street Railway operated cars 
all night in order to keep the system open. In Kingston 
.steam and electric railway service was demoralized and 
business was practically at a standstill, and in St. Thomas 
the street railway system was tied up all day and the elec- 
tric line from St. Thomas to London and Port Stanley was 
blocked. 



348 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 7 



CLEVELAND MATTERS 

The opinion prevails in Cleveland that the Council will 
not authorize the Cleveland Railway to purchase some addi- 
tional auto busses to determine their adaptability for passen- 
ger business. John J. Stanley, president of the company, 
said recently that a dozen busses in addition to the two 
now in use would be necessary to test their work on East 
Thirtieth Street, as is proposed in the Stolte resolution now 
before Council. He is not in favor of the plan. 

City engineers have reported that the plan to build a 
subway under the Cuyahoga River, in connection with the 
elimination of a dangerous bend near the site of the pro- 
posed Lorain-Huron bridge, is feasible. Councilman Moylan 
requested the investigation in the belief that a tube could 
be built in connection with the construction of the bridge 
and that it could be used by a rapid transit line in the 
Walworth Run valley. 

At a recent meeting of the Lakewood Chamber of Com- 
merce it developed that Lakewood is willing to grant the 
Cleveland Railway an extension of franchise in return for 
the extension of the West Madison line from West 117th 
Street to Riverside Avenue, Lakewood. The company de- 
sires the franchise to expire with that of the Tayler grant 
in 1934. The plan would give the Lakewood people 3-cent 
fare within their own city. 



than those designated in its franchise, if its plan should 
interfere with the rapid transit road that is now under 
consideration. 



ONTARIO RAILWAYS UNDER COMPENSATION ACT 

The steam and electric railways of the Province of Onta- 
rio learned through their representatives on Jan. 15 what 
the Workmen's Compensation Commission expects of them 
under the operation of the compensation act. Lawyers rep- 
resenting the different companies called upon the commis- 
sion and went fully into the subject of their responsibilities 
and duties under the act. The board pointed out the proce- 
dure established. The railways are in Schedule 1 of the 
act, which means that while they are under the general pro- 
visions of the measure they are not brought within the 
grouping system, each company being held individually lia- 
ble for the compensation due a workman or his dependents 
in case of injury or death. According to the board's plans, 
when a workman is injured or killed, the company must at 
once notify the commission, supplying a physician's report 
and other data. The commission passes upon the case, fixes 
the compensation due the workman and notifies the com- 
pany. A check for the amount fixed must then be forward- 
ed to the commission, which places it upon record and sends 
it on to the workman. In every respect the employee of a 
railway receives the same protection and compensation as 
the worker under the general scheme, the only difference be- 
ing that he gets his compensation from his employer instead 
of from a general fund. The board has met one objection to 
the individual liability system advanced by the men by ar- 
ranging that the worker need not go to the employer to 
claim his rights. This is designed to protect the timid work- 
man against relinquishment of his compensation or a part 
of it, especially in case of slight injury, owing to the fear 
that the pressing of his claim may prejudice his situation. 



DEVELOPMENTS IN CINCINNATL 

The Rapid Transit Commission of Cincinnati has been 
asked by the Central Avenue Improvement Association to 
have the subway, necessary to the proposed rapid transit 
road, run down Central Avenue instead of Plum Street, no 
matter which of the four schemes under consideration may 
be adopted. 

On Feb. 5 the People's Power League filed a petition with 
the city auditor, with 10,632 signatures, asking that a 
referendum vote on the franchise granted the Cincinnati, 
Newport & Covington Street Railway be taken at the regu- 
lar election in November. The auditor has asked the city 
solicitor's opinion as to whether two elections will be neces- 
sary, one at the regular date in the fall, in compliance with 
this petition, and, a special election on March 9, as asked 
in a petition filed by the business men of the city previously. 
The latter contained 30,000 names. While City Solicitor 
Schoenle had given no opinion early in the week, it is 
believed that the special election will be held. This company 
has informed the city that it will use some other streets 



L C. C. ACCIDENT BULLETIN FOR YEAR 

The Interstate Commerce Commission has issued accident 
bulletin No. 52, covering the three months ended June 30, 
1914, and the year ended June 30, 1914. The table of 
collisions and derailments on electric railways for the year 
contained in the bulletin follows: 

Damage to 
Road and 
Number of Equipment 
Persons and Cost 

I * ^ of Clearing 

No. Classes Number Killed Injured Wrecks 

Collisions : 

1 Rear 69 18 675 $24,793 

2 Butting 32 4 143 51,906 

4 Miscellaneous 53 1 208 17,473 

Total 154 23 1,026 $94,172 

Derailments due to : 

5 Defects of roadway.... 18 1 38 $11,032 

6 Defects of equipment.. 16 .. 37 8,033 

7 Negligence of trainmen, 

signalmen, etc 8 . . 9 1,173 

8. Unforeseen obstruction 

of track, etc 14 1 38 5,750 

9 Malicious obstruction of 

track, etc 3 . . 7 395 

10 Miscellaneous causes. .. . 19 2 134 11,003 

Total 78 4 263 $37,386 , 

Total collisions and 

derailments 232 27 1,289 $131,558 

Total for year : 

1913 275 29 1,401 211,777 

1912 261 21 1,605 117,865 

1911 255 92 1,291 110,466 

The summaries of casualties to persons on the electric 
railways for the years ended June 30, 1914, and 1913 
follow : 

Passengers ; 

r-^ — 1914 V ,--—1913 , 

No. Item Killed Injured Killed Injured 

1 In train accidents 18 1,182 10 1,252 

2 Other causes 40 2,047 26 1,789 

Total 58 3,229 36 3,041 

Employees on duty : 

3 In train accidents 9 100 18 154 

4 In coupling accidents 2 25 1 19 

5 Overhead obstructions, etc... 2 28 6 34 

6 Falling from cars, etc 8 126 8 138 

7 Other causes 25 289 17 203 

Total 46 568 50 548 

Total passengers and em- „ ,„„ 

ployees on duty 104 3,797 86 • 3,5 SO 

Employees not on duty : 

8 In train accidents 16 

9 In coupling accidents .... .. .••• 

10 Overhead obstruction, etc .... .. ••■• 

11 Falling from cars, etc 1 13 1 1^ 

12 Other causes 2 5 2 I 

Total ~i 34 3 2S 

Other persons not trespassing: 

13 In train accidents 1 4 1 8 

14 Other causes 247 1,081 196 860 

Total 248 1,085 197 86S 

Trespassers : 

15 In train accidents .... . . . . . • 

16 Other causes 168 139 117 123 

Total 168 139 117 123 

Total accidents involving 

train operation 523 5,005 403 4,fiiiN 

17 Industrial accidents 28 1,053 19 79.S 

Grand total 551 6,108 422 5,406 



CHICAGO TRACTION FUND FOR AUTO BUSES 

According to an opinion handed down by the corporation 
counsel of Chicago, the City Council is at liberty to use the 
traction fund, which represents the city's share of the net 
earnings of the surface lines, for the purchase and operation 
of a municipal bus system. In brief the opinion states that 
the city may, upon the passage of an appropriate ordinance, 
use the traction fund to acquire these buses and other prop- 
erty necessary for the operation of the bus line. The city 
may also acquire and own a bus system and lease it to a cor- 
poration for operation. Before an ordinance for acquiring 
and conducting the system would be legal, however, it must 



February 13, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



349 



have the approval of the voters, and they must also approve 
the plan for operating the system. This opinion was based 
upon the fact that although the traction ordinances provide 
that the city traction fund shall be used for the purchase and 
construction of street railways, the Supreme Court held that 
subways come under this provision. Furthermore, it was 
claimed that the 1907 City Council had no right to bind the 
succeeding councils on the purpose for which the traction 
fund should be used, providing the city's contractual rela- 
tions were not molested. 



Ohio Legislation. — A bill has been introduced in the Legis- 
lature to require all interurban and street cars to be 
equipped with a particular style of air brake and a par- 
ticular Sander. 

Utah Commission Bill Opposed. — The Evans bill to create 
a public utilities commission in Utah was opposed by the 
representatives of the railroads and the public utilities on 
Feb. 5 as being unfair and unduly burdensome. The hear- 
ing was continued by the Senate committee to Feb. 9. 

Kansas City Enabling Act. — A bill has been introduced in 
the Legislature of Missouri authorizing Kansas City to put 
aside the percentage it receives under the new franchise 
granted the Metropolitan Street Railway until sufficient 
money has accumulated to purchase the system. 

Transfer of Ferry Service Sought. — Mayor Malone, of 
Chelsea, Mass., will shortly confer with the Boston Cham- 
ber of Commerce on behalf of turning over the ferry service 
between Chelsea and Boston to the Boston Elevated Railway 
and Bay State Street Railway in case the consolidation of 
the two companies is approved by the Legislature. 

Toledo Prize Awards. — In the contest for the best criti- 
cism of the first franchise draft prepared by Henry L. 
Doherty and his associates in the Toledo Railways & Light 
Company awards were announced on Feb. 2. Judge John A. 
Doyle received the first prize, $100; Orville S. Brumbach, 
second, $75; William C. Clark, third, $50, and S. P. Bowles, 
fourth, $25. 

Recent New York Bills. — Among the bills introduced re- 
cently in the New York Legislature are the following: to 
amend the public service commissions law in relation to 
quotation of rates by common carries; to amend the rail- 
road law in relation to the minimum number of employees 
to be employed in the operation of certain trains; to amend 
the railroad law in relation to the length of trains. 

Extension Question in Toronto. — The suggestion of Mayor 
Church, of Toronto, Ont., that application be made to the 
Ontario Legislature for the passing of an act compelling 
the Toronto Railway and the Toronto Suburban Railway to 
extend their lines and improve their services and equip- 
ment forthwith was adopted by the Board of Control on 
Jan. 29. The matter was expected to come before the Coun- 
' cil on Feb. 1. 

Subway Report in Los Angeles. — The Council of Los An- 
geles, Cal., by a unanimous vote, has adopted a resolution 
instructing the Board of Public Utilities to make a careful 
study of the traffic situation between Temple Street on the 
north, Tenth Street on the south. Main Street on the east, 
Hill Street on the West, and submit a report showing the 
results of such investigations and estimates of cost covering 
the construction of a subway system. 

Rehearing Denied in Mill-Tax Case. — The Supreme Court 
of Missouri has denied the application of the United Rail- 
ways, St. Louis, Mo., for permission to file a motion for 
a rehearing in the mill-tax case. The case will be appealed 
to the Supreme Court of the United States. The company 
will contend in presenting the case to the United States 
Supreme Court that the Missouri Supreme Court misinter- 
prets a former decision of the United States Supreme Court. 

Important Question Before Ohio Commission. — Walter 
M. Schoenle, city solicitor of Cincinnati, and Lawrence 
Maxwell and Ellis G. Kinkead, attorneys for the company, 
requested the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio on Jan. 25 
to state the extent to which the Cincinnati Traction Com- 
pany will be allowed credit in its reproduction value for 
the money spent in paving between its tracks. The opinion 
of the commission is desired as a guide in the consideration 
of the questions that have come up with regard to the 
road. 



Illinois Public Utilities Commission Closes First Year. — 

The State Public Utilities Commission of Illinois has closed 
its first year of work and reports receipts of $510,173 and 
expenditures of $180,000, including all salaries and the 
fitting up of offices in Springfield and Chicago. More than 
3000 cases were considered during the year, and of approxi- 
mately 500 formal cases heard eighteen appeals were taken 
from the decision of the commission. Nine of these appeals 
were heard in the circuit court of Sangamon County at 
Springfield and in no case was the decision of the com- 
mission reversed. 

Bills Introduced in Maine. — Two workmen's compensation 
measures known respectively as the Swift bill and the Cole 
bill, have been introduced intp the Legislature of Maine. A 
bill regarded as the most drastic bill by far presented at 
the present session has just made its appearance in the 
Senate. This measure would create the People's Water 
Rates & Power Commission. Under it all water powers 
now privately owned would be taken over by the commis- 
sion, rented for the benefit of the State and the entire ques- 
tion of the control of water powers taken from the jurisdic- 
tion of the Public Utilities Commission. 

Key Route Must Build Interlocker. — The Railroad Com- 
mission of California has rendered a decision in which it 
finds that the interlocking plant at Lowell Street and Stan- 
ford Avenue in the city of Oakland is inadequate and un- 
safe. This tower protects the tracks of the San Francisco- 
Oakland Terminal Railways, the Southern Pacific Company 
and the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway. These car- 
riers are directed to replace the present tower with a first- 
class, standard, interlocking plant within six months from 
the date of the commission's order. The first-named com- 
pany will have to bear the greater portion of the expense. 

Proposed Consolidation of Utilities and Tax Commissions. 

— ^There has been talk in Ohio, in connection with the Gov- 
ernor's program of economy, of consolidating the State 
Public Utilities and the State Tax Commissions. James 
Boyle and J. H. McGiffert have been nominated as mem- 
bers of the Tax Commission to succeed Frank E. Munn and 
Christian Pabst. Mr. Boyle served as private secretary 
of the late William McKinley when he was Governor and 
as consul to Liverpool during Mr. McKinley's administra- 
tion as president. Mr. McGiffert was connected with the 
State Auditor's office under Walter D. Guilbert and E. M. 
Pullington and afterwards was transferred to the State 
Tax Commission in charge of the collection of the excise 
tax on corporations. 

Los Angeles Railway Purchase Considered by City. — The 

City Council of Los Angeles, Cal., is considering what policy 
it shall follow in handling expiring street railway fran- 
chises. The acquisition of the street railways by the city 
under the charter provision whereby the city may issue 
bonds against a revenue-producing utility is being urged. 
At a recent executive conference of the Council, George A. 
Damon, associate of Bion J. Arnold, Chicago, who made the 
transportation study for the city several years ago, said 
that the city could take over the railways by paying a por- 
tion of the equity value of the railways, and issuing bonds 
against the railways themselves for the balance. The Coun- 
cil as a committee of the whole has referred the matter to 
the board of utilities. 

Philadelphia Councils Desire Rapid Transit Details. — 

Councils, in both chambers, on Feb. 4, adopted a resolution 
requesting Transit Director A. Merritt Taylor to present 
to Councils, if possible by Feb. 18, a complete list and full 
description of the subway, elevated and surface lines con- 
templated to be constructed under his rapid transit improve- 
ment plans. Robert S. Dripps, reform floor leader in Com- 
mon Council, declared that Mr. Taylor had made a full re- 
port to Councils on his plans last summer and that the reso- 
lution w'as aimed to prevent the people expressing their 
views at the proposed special election next month on the 
Taylor plans by vote at the polls on the $30,000,000 perma- 
nent loan for carrying on the work. Mr. Taylor said: "All 
the information required by the resolution has been worked 
out in detail and is on file in the Department of City Transit. 
I am very glad to have the opportunity of furnishing this 
information to the City Councils in the specific form re- 
quested, with every detail which is relevant thereto." 



350 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 7 



Financial and Corporate 

MR. BYLLESBY ON BUSINESS 

This Public Utility Operator Looks Forward to a Recurring 
Period of Reasonable Expansion of Utility Business 

H. M. Byllesby, speaking in a recent interview particu- 
larly about electric light, power and gas properties, stated 
that these seem to be enjoying a greatly increased popular 
standing on account of the stability which they have shown 
during the last few years of legislative attacks and gen- 
erally depressed business conditions. 

In regard to the general business conditions, Mr. Byllesby 
said: 

"From one end of the country to the other there is a 
growing confidence in a revival of general business, and 
there is no enterprise which responds more quickly to such 
a revival than the public utilities. The corollary naturally 
follows that with a revival in the activity of the utilities, 
a corresponding increase is immediately felt in the opera- 
tion of the vast industries whose business is the manufac- 
ture of wire, pipe, structural material, electrical machinery, 
boilers and various adjuncts for utility operation. 

"Within the last few years there has been a very pro- 
nounced curtailment of the development of all classes of 
utilities on account of a variety of reasons, principal among 
which have been the extreme difficulty of providing capital 
for their further development and the disinclination of 
the operators of such properties to engage in further 
development risks in the face of the drastic attitude of the 
public and regulatory bodies and the uncertain business 
conditions. Believing that both of these conditions have 
materially changed for the better within the last few 
months, however, I have reason to expect a recurring of 
reasonable expansion of the utility business." 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



MR. FARRELL SEES BUSINESS BOOM 



Head of Steel Corporation Sees Unprecedented Opportuni- 
ties at Hand in the United States 

President Farrell of the United States Steel Corporation, 
in a recent address before the Engineers' Society of West- 
ern Pennsylvania, stated that the financial tide in the United 
States has turned and that the country now has before it a 
period of unprecedented prosperity. In his opinion, every 
day now records a marked improvement in the general situa- 
tion. 

Continuing Mr. Farrell said: 

"Our foreign trade balance for January will approximate 
$150,000,000, a figure never before approached in our his- 
tory. Eminent authorities have Calculated that this may 
easily reach $1,000,000,000 for 1915. This is important, for 
the years of greatest prosperity have been when the bal- 
ances were largely in our favor. 

"We are furnishing Canada with capital and we have 
made a beginning in extending investment to South and 
Central America. Moreover, the United States is to-day the 
chief granary of Europe. The prices received should insure 
for our farming population and therefore for the general 
population an unprecedented measure of prosperity. 

"The steel trade is improving and the outlook is encourag- 
ing. The lumber industry is showing similar results. Large 
orders from belligerents and neutrals in Europe are keeping 
various lines of industry quite busy. Building has been 
quiet, but investors are coming to realize that money can be 
saved by starting operations now, material being available 
at unusually attractive prices. There is evidence of increas- 
ing merchandise traffic on the railroads, of opportunity to 
earn more money to establish credit and make expenditures 
for materials and equipment — which all mean activity in 
manufacturing lines dependent upon railroads for orders." 

Mr. Farrell, in closing his address, announced the resump- 
tion of new construction work by the United States Steel 
Corporation. He said that last year the company had sus- 
pended all operations of new construction in the Pittsburgh 
district, but as evidence of its faith in the immediate future 
it had decided to proceed with work at once in order that it 
might be prepared for greater things. 



Cleveland Railway 

The statement of income, profit and loss of the Cleveland 
(Ohio) Railway for the year ended Dec. 31, 1914, follows: 

Based on Ordinance Allowances 

Cents 
Per 

Operating revenues : MHe 

Revenue from transportation $7 610 ")9'' 

Revenue from operations other than trans- 
portation 81 751 

Total operating revenues $7,692,343 23.80 

Expense allowances : 

Maintenance allowance $1,602,398 4.96 

Operating expense allowance 3,910,934 12.10 

Total expense allowances $5,513,332 17.06 

Operating income $2,179,011 6 74 

Non-operating income 43,334 o!l3 

Gross income $2,222 345 6 87 

Taxes 466,996 1^44 

Net income $1,755,349 5.43 

Interest 1,702,259 5.27 

Surplus . . $53,090 0.16 

Special allowances 180,000 .055 

Deficit $126.910 0.39 

Based on Disbursements 

Operating revenues $7,692,343 23.80 

Actual expenses : 

Maintenance of way and structures $1,158,683 3.58 

Maintenance of equipment — except power 

plant 649,898 2.02 

Maintenance of power plant 119,677 0.37 

I'ower 728 227 2 25 

Conducting transportation 2,406[999 7^45 

Traffic S99 0.00 

General and miscellaneous 815,113 2.52 

Total maintenance and operating expenses. $5,879,676 18.19 

Operating income $1,812,667 5.61 

Non-operatirg income 43,334 0.13 

Gross income $1,856,001 5.74 

Taxes 466,996 1.44 

Net income $1,389,005 4,30 

Interest 1,702,259 5.27 

Deficit $313,254 0.97 

Obsolete equipment 120,000 0.37 

Total deficit $433,254 1,34 



The increase in passenger revenue during the year, ex- 
clusive of transfers, amounted to $299,616 or 4.31 per cent, 
while the increase in passenger revenue, including trans- 
fers, was $532,336 or 7.66 per cent. Gross income increased 
$554,911 or 7.58 per cent. The increase in maintenance 
allowance was $99,267 or 6.6 per cent, and the increase of 
maintenance expenses was $235,427 or 13.91 per cent. The 
operating allowance increased $216,111 or 5.85 per cent, 
while the operating expenses increased $246,953 or 6.66 per 
cent. Taxes increased $32,323 or 7.3 per cent, and interest 
$130,688 or 8.31 per cent. The total increase in operating 
expenses, taxes and interest amounted to $409,965 or 7.18 
per cent, and the increase in maintenance and operating 
expenses, taxes and interest was $645,392 or 8.72 per cent. 
The year showed the following increases in transportation 
statistics: Fares, 9,638,017 or 4.37 per cent; transfers, 
5,056,031 or 5.77 per cent; rides, 14,349,271 or 4.61 per cent; 
ordinance car-miles, 1,965,425 or 6.52 per cent, and actual 
car-miles, 2,605,760 or 8.43 per cent. 

The report states that the most important development 
during the year, in its effect upon the finances of the com- 
pany, was the Increase in the rate of fare. In July the net 
balance in the interest fund fell below $300,000 and on 
Sept. 1 the company began to retain the 1 cent charge per 
transfer instead of returning it. The effect of this on the 
pas.senger revenue was an increase of 8.97 per cent for Sep- 
tember, 11.21 per cent for October, 16.06 per cent for No- 
vember, and 9.07 per cent for December as compared to the 
corresponding months of 1913. The first eight months of 
1914 showed an increase in passenger revenue of 5.84 per 
cent and the last four months an increase of 11.21 per cent, 
or an average for the twelve months of 7.66 per cent. 



February 13, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



351 



The receipts for transfers in the last four months 
amounted to $232,719. Omitting these transfer receipts, the 
report shows that the increase for the last four months 
dropped to 1.32 per cent, which was made up of increases 
as follows: September, 0.87 per cent; October, 1.24 per 
cent; November, 5.75 per cent and December, 0.42 per cent. 
The receipts for November, 1913, was less by about $40,000 
than they would have been but for the great storm of that 
month. If this amount were added to this month's revenues 
to bring them up to normal, the increase in November, 
1914, would be changed to a decrease. The last four months 
of the year would then show a decrease of 0.375 per cent 
instead of an increase of 1.32 per cent. The serious drop 
in earnings came in August. On the basis of actual earn- 
ings the passenger revenue for the first seven months in- 
creased 6.59 per cent and for the last five months 1.27 per 
cent. On the basis of the revised figures for November, 
1913, the passenger revenue during the last five months 
decreased 0.07 per cent, giving an average of 3.71 per cent 
as compared to 4.31 per cent under the preceding calcula- 
tion. The increase in the rate of fare, which was intended 
to make up the depletion in the interest fund, was therefore 
but little more than enough in the four months to take the 
place of the reduction in earnings in the last five months 
caused by the change in general business conditions. 

The charges to expense during the year for repairs of 
the physical property and for such renewals as were prop- 
erly chargeable to expense, amounted to $1,928,437 or 5.97 
cents per revenue car mile. The total amount allowed for 
these purposes and for depreciation was $1,602,398. The 
expenditures, therefore, exceeded the ordinance allowance 
by $326,039, and the maintenance, renewal and deprecia- 
tion reserve at the end of the year was over-expended to 
the extent of $490,687. During the ten months ended Dec. 
31 the company deducted from gross receipts and credited 
to the reserve $120,000 for abandoned property, whose re- 
production value is set at $705,348. The company is also 
charging gross receipts and crediting to the reserve $6,000 
per month from March until $217,444 has been paid in, this 
sum being the amount of over-expenditures in the mainte- 
nance, depreciation, and renewal reserve on March 1, 1913. 
The operating expenses for the year were 12.22 cents per 
car mile, or 0.12 cents in excess of the operating expense 
allowance. The report states that it may be necessary, 
therefore, to make an application to the City Council before 
the end of the ordinance year for at least a temporary 
increase in the allowance. It is stated that there was an 
increase in revenue car miles in the year as a whole, but 
that the service was reduced in August and figures for the 
last four months show a decrease of about 305,000 miles. 
If this reduction in service had not been made, the operat- 
ing expense allowance would have been $37,000 greater, but 
the actual expenses would have been increased only about 
half of this amount. Furthermore, the earnings of the 
entire road per car mile were 23.32 cents, but the earnings 
of new crosstown lines varied from 10.09 cents to 20.75 
cents and their total cost of operation, including mainte- 
nance, operating expenses, taxes and interest, was 25.27 
cents. There was also an increase of expenditures in the 
accident department, due to causes beyond the control of the 
management, from 1.02 cents to 1.27 cents per car mile. 

One hundred and sixty new cars were added to the com- 
pany's rolling stock during the year, and sixty-nine cars 
were retired. On the basis of numbers only, the net increase 
in the year was 8 per cent. On Dec. 31 the company had 
1373 revenue cars and 183 service cars. Its single track mile- 
age was 344.746 miles. Betterment expenditures during the 
year amounted to $2,577,867. 

The total number of stockholders of the company is 4262, 
with average holdings of thirty-nine shares. The stock- 
holders residing in Ohio, 3813 or 89.5 per cent, own 88 per 
cent of the outstanding stock. Of these stockholders, 2979 
with an average holding of sixty-six shares, reside in Cleve- 
land and Cuyahoga County. 

In March the stockholders were allowed to purchase addi- 
tional capital stock to the amount of 10 per cent of their 
holdings. Of the $2,141,000 offered, $2,137,400 was so sold. 
In September an additional offering of $2,382,000 was made, 
of which $1,914,800 had been issued up to Jan. 20. On Dec. 
31 the total amount of capital stock outstanding was $25,- 
221,200. 



KANSAS CITY REORGANIZATION PLAN 

No Assessment on Stock Issues of Kansas City Railway & 

Light Company— New Bonds Proposed — $3,400,000 

of Working Capital Needed 

Chairman Dunham of the reorganization committee of the 
Kansas City Railway & Light Company, Kansas City, Mo., 
on Feb. 8 announced the details of the proposed plan of 
reorganization for the company. The $9,407,500 of preferred 
stock and $9,543,080 of common stock of the Kansas City 
Railway & Light Company outstanding in the hands of the 
public will remain undisturbed, and no assessments will be 
levied. 

The secured indebtedness of the company, amounting to 
$28,700,000, is to be cared for in the following ways: To 
pay off $24,920,000 of overdue securities (including $10,- 
200,000 of Kansas City Railway & Light Company first lien 
refunding mortgage 5's, $5,478,000 of Kansas City Railway 
& Light Company Series A and Series B 6 per cent notes, 
$7,242,000 of Metropolitan Street Railway consolidated mort- 
gage 5's and $2,000,000 of Central Electric Railway first 
mortgage 5's), to provide for additions and to pay debts, 
there will be a new issue of twenty-five-year 5 per cent 
first mortgage bonds exclusively upon the street rail- 
way property of the Kansas City Railways, the successor 
to the Metropolitan Street Railway, and also an issue of 
new twenty-five-year 6 per cent first lien collateral mort- 
gage notes of the Kansas City Railway & Light Company. 
The collateral for this second new issue will be the stock of 
both the street railway and the lighting properties. The 
electric light company will be left without a direct lien on 
its property, and will have power to mortgage it for future 
extensions, provided the stockholders under commission ap- 
proval raise $150 for every $850 raised by bonds. 

In changing the old overdue issues into these two new 
issues, the Metropolitan Street Railway consolidated mort- 
gage 5's and the Kansas City Railway & Light Company 
first lien refunding mortgage 5's are to be exchangeable 
at 107 for the new Kansas City Railway bonds. Provision 
is made, however, that the Metropolitan bonds may be 
changed at par into a separate issue of three-year 5% per 
cent notes of the Kansas City Railway & Light Company. 
The matured Series A and Series B notes of the Kansas 
City Railway & Light Company are to be exchanged at 105 
for the new Kansas City Railway & Light Company first 
lien collateral mortgage 6 per cent notes. The $2,000,000 
of Central Electric Railway first mortgage 5's are also to be 
exchanged for these first lien notes at 105. 

Thus far all the outstanding issues except $680,000 of 
Corrigan Consolidated and East Side bonds and railway and 
light 5 per cent notes to banks, and except $3,100,000 of Kan- 
sas City Elevated Railway and Kansas City & Westport 
Belt Railway first mortgage bonds have been covered. The 
first named group will be paid in cash, while the bonds of 
the second group, maturing in 1922 and 1926, will be left 
lying on their respective properties. An amount of $3,410,- 
000 of the new Kansas City Railways bonds, however, is set 
aside to acquire these unmatured bonds or obtain a clear 
title to the property securing them. Portions not so used 
are to be cancelled. 

To insure the success of this reorganization plan it is 
necessary to raise working capital estimated at $3,400,000. 
For this purpose an arrangement has been made to under- 
write at 85 $4,000,000 of an authorized issue of $15,000,000 
of new twenty-five-year 6 per cent second lien Kansas City 
Railway & Light Company notes. The stockholders are 
offered the option of taking their proportionate share of 
these notes at the same figure. Chairman Dunham states 
that it is hoped to have the plan in operation by July 1. 
It must be approved by the Federal Court, the Mayor and 
City Counselor and the Public Service Commission. 



Auburn & Syracuse Electric Railroad, Syracuse, N. Y. — 

The Public Service Commission for the Second District of 
New York has authorized an issue of $150,000 of eighteen- 
months 6 per cent notes and $43,400 of 6 per cent equipment 
trust certificates of the Auburn & Syracuse Electric Rail- 
road. The notes are dated Feb. 1, 1915, and due on Aug. 
1, 1916, and are to be sold at not less than 99%. The net 
proceeds, or $149,250, are to be applied toward the pay- 



352 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[VOL. XLV, No. 7 



ment of outstanding notes payable and bills payable and 
also part of the company's $300,000 of notes heretofore 
authorized. The equipment trust certificates, issued in 
connection with the Guaranty Trust Company, New York, 
are to be accompanied by a cash payment of $10,580 and 
are to be paid in four installments with interest on the de- 
ferred payments at 6 per cent. The proceeds are to be used 
to purchase twelve new enclosed body electric passenger 
cars. 

Bryan & Central Texas Interurban Railroad, Bryan, Tex. 

— It is reported that J. A. Turner was on Jan. 26 appointed 
receiver of the Bryan & Central Texas Interurban Railroad. 
The appointment was made at Houston by the United States 
District Court on the application of A. C. Price, New York, 
trustee. 

Columbus Railway, Power & Light Company, Columbus, 
Ohio. — The Ohio Public Utilities Commission has authorized 
the Columbus Railway, Power & Light Company to issue 
and deliver to the holders of a like amount of the pre- 
ferred and common stocks of the Columbus Light & Power 
Company, an amount of $516,300 of the preferred stock, 
series A, and $210,500 of the preferred stock, series B, of 
the Columbus Railway, Power & Light Company, in full 
and final payment for the property of the Columbus Light, 
Heat & Power Company. These amounts constitute an 
amendment to the original order of consolidation of April 
22, 1913, and show the basis for the purchase of the lighting 
and heating company, which was authorized by the stock- 
holders of the railway company on Jan. 26, as noted in the 
Electric Railway Journal of Feb. 6. 

Jersey Central Traction Company, Keyport, N. J. — The 
Board of Public Utility Commissioners of New Jersey has 
issued a certificate approving an issue of bonds to the 
amount of $1,754,000 by the Jersey Central Traction Com- 
pany. 

Lincoln Railway & Heating Company, Lincoln, 111. — The 

Lincoln Railway & Heating Company has been granted 
a certificate of incorporation by the Secretary of State of 
Illinois. The company's capital stock is stated to be $15,000. 
The incorporators are J. R. Patton, John A. Hoblit and 
Frank S. Bevan. This company succeeds the Lincoln Rail- 
way & Light Company, which was sold at public auction on 
Jan. 14 to J. R. Patton, as noted in the Electric Railway 
Journal of Jan. 23. 

New York State Railways, Rochester, N. Y. — Harris, 
Forbes & Company, New York, announce that practically all 
of the first consolidated mortgage fifty-year 4V4 per cent 
gold bonds of the New York State Railways recently offered 
by this company and N. W. Harris & Company, Inc., Boston, 
and the Harris Trust & Savings Bank, Chicago, as noted in 
the Electric Railway Journal of Jan. 30 and Feb. 6, have 
already been sold. 

Oakland, Antioch & Eastern Railway, Oakland, Cal. — 

The Sacramento Valley Electric Company has leased its 
12-mile line, connecting the town of Dixon with the Oakland, 
Antioch & Eastern Railway's tracks, to the latter company 
for a period of six months, with the privilege of then re- 
newing the lease. The lessee plans to operate the Dixon 
line as a feeder for the main system. The Railway Com- 
mission of California has authorized the Oakland, Antioch 
& Eastern Railway to issue two notes in the sum of $58,000 
to replace two other notes previously issued without the 
consent of the commission. The company is further granted 
authority to mortgage certain real estate in the city of 
Sacramento now used for terminal purposes, as security 
for the notes. The amount of these notes was by a mis- 
print stated to be $68,000 in the Electric Railway Journal 
of Jan. 30. 

Oklahoma Union Traction Company, Tulsa, Okla. — The 
Oklahoma Union Traction Company was sold on Feb. 5 at 
receiver's sale for $53,500 to A. J. Biddleson, who rep- 
resented interests of the Colonial Trust Company. This 
company has 5 miles of track completed and 15 mijes under 
construction. 

Ottumwa Railway & Light Company, Ottumwa, Iowa. — 

H. M. Byllesby & Company reports that the gross earnings 
and miscellaneous income of the Ottumwa Railway & Light 
Company for the twelve months ended Dec. 31, 1914, were 
$324,928, as compared to $320,684 in 1913. The expenses 



and taxes in the two years amounted to $179,126 and 
$175,172, leaving net earnings of $145,802 and $145,512. 
The interest charges were $66,918 and $66,786, and the pre- 
ferred stock dividends in each year $31,493, so that the 
balance was $47,390 for 1914 and $47,233 for 1913. 

Peoria Railway, Peoria, 111. — The Peoria Railway has 
been granted authority by the Illinois Pacific Utilities Com- 
mission to issue $570,000 of first and refunding mortgage 
bonds, dated June 20, 1906, and secured by a mortgage to 
the Chicago Title & Trust Company, trustee. 

Public Service Railway, Newark, N. J. — The Board of 
Public Utilities Commissioners of New Jersey has granted 
permission to the Public Service Railway for the thirty-year 
extension at 5 per cent of the payment date for $100,000 
of 5 per cent bonds of the North Hudson County Railway, 
due on Feb. 1. 

Puget Sound Traction, Light & Traction Company, Seattle, 
Wash. — Lee, Higginson & Company, Boston, and Harris, 
Forbes & Company, New York, are offering at 100% and 
interest, to yield about 5.85 per cent, an additional $557,000 
of five-year 6 per cent mortgage gold bonds of the Puget 
Sound Traction, Light & Power Company. These bonds 
are dated Jan. 15, 1914, and are due on Feb. 1, 1919. This 
issue will make $8,067,000 outstanding of the $15,000,000 
issue. 

San Francisco (CaL) Municipal Railways. — The Decem- 
ber net earnings of the San Francisco municipal railway 
system amounted to $42,136, according to a report filed on 
Jan. 29 with the Board of Works. The city's cars are un- 
harmed by the "jitney" busses, the report stated, as the 
new carriers have not come into competition with the city 
except for the short distance on Market street. The total 
receipts for December were $110,483, less United Railroad 
transfer reductions, and the expenses totaled $68,347. 

San Francisco-Oakland Terminal Railways, Oakland, Cal. 

— The Railroad Commission of California has issued a 
supplemental order amending a previous decision in which 
the San Francisco-Oakland Terminal Railways was allowed 
to use $75,000 of a promissory note issue for the purchase 
of new cars, as noted in the Electric Railw.4Y Journal of 
Jan. 2. Under the terms of the new order, the company 
receives permission to expend $60,000 of this $75,000 in 
reimbursing its treasury for moneys expended from income, 
provided after such reimbursement the money is used for 
the payment of taxes falling due on Feb. 1, 1915. 

Seattle, Renton & Southern Railway, Seattle, Wash. — In 

a recent decision holding the Illinois law declaring interest 
rates higher than 7 per cent to usury applied, Judge A. W. 
Frater of the King County Superior Court awarded Peabody, 
Houghtaling & Company, Chicago, only $270,000 of its 
$300,000 claim against the Seattle, Renton & Southern Rail- 
way on collateral trust notes of this electric line held by 
the banking firm. The amount allowed was the principal 
of the notes, the court holding that $30,000 of interest and 
discount, amounting to 8 per cent, was invalid because in 
excess of the interest allowed by Illinois law. Judge Frater, 
however, decided that a bond issue of $125,000 made by the 
railway, bought by the banking house and resold to small 
investors, was valid, inasmuch as the combined interest and 
discount did not exceed 6.8 per cent. 

Southern Pacific Company, San Francisco, Cal. — Accord- 
ing to a statement issued in the West, the Southern Pacific 
Company is preparing to take over various lines which it 
owns in Oregon and Washington. These include the elec- 
trically-operated Portland, Eugene & Eastern Railway. The 
statement says that the Southern Pacific Company owns 
the capital stocks of these companies, and their purchase 
is merely in accordance with the stock ownership. It is 
largely a bookkeeping matter and does not affect the public 
interest. 

Southern Public Utilities Company, Charlotte, N. C. — 

The Southern Public Utilities Company has sold $2,600,000 
of first and refunding mortgage 5 per cent gold bonds, due 
on July 1, 1943, to William Morris Imbrie & Company. This 
banking house has been appointed the fiscal agent of the 
company. The Southern Public Utilities Company owns and 
operates various electric power and lighting plants, gas 
plants and water works in the Piedmont section of North 



February 13, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



353 



and South Carolina. It also owns the propei'ty of the 
former Winston-Salem Railway & Electric Company. 

United Traction Company, Pittsburgh, Pa. — No action has 
been taken upon the declaration of a dividend on the pre- 
ferred stock of the United Traction Company, and the com- 
mittee representing the preferred stockholders has called 
for deposits with the Philadelphia Trust, State Deposit & 
Insurance Company. Previous references to the dividend 
situation with this company were made in the Electric 
Railway Journal of Jan. 9 and Jan. 16. 

Waverly, Sayre & Athens Traction Company, Waverly, 

N. Y.— A bill has been filed in the New York State Senate 
to validate the consolidation of the Susquehanna Valley 
Electric Traction Company, a New York State railway cor- 
poration, with the Waverly, Sayre & Athens Electric Trac- 
tion Company, a Pennsylvania railway corporation, by which 
the Waverly, Sayre & Athens Traction Company was 
formed in 1894. The bill requires the certification of the 
Public Service Commission for the Second District of New 
York that the consolidation was made with the consent of 
the holders of more than two-thirds of the capital stock of 
each of the constituent companies and that all of the stock- 
holders have acquiesced therein. 

West Jersey & Seashore Railroad, Camden, N. J. — The 

stockholders of the West Jersey & Seashore Railroad voted 
on Feb. 4 to increase the common capital stock of the 
company by $3,000,000 and to execute a mortgage to secure 
not to exceed $6,000,000 of general and refunding bonds. 
Preliminary mention of these changes was made in the 
Electric Railway Journal on Jan. 2. 



DIVIDENDS DECLARED 

Central Arkansas Railway & Light Corporation, Hot 
Springs, Ark., quarterly, 1% per cent, preferred. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway, Greenfield, Mass., 
quarterly, three-fourths of 1 per cent, common. 

Detroit (Mich.) United Railway, quarterly, 1% per cent. 

Massachusetts Consolidated Railways, Greenfield, Mass., 
quarterly, 1% per cent, preferred. 

Pacific Gas & Electric Company, San Francisco, Cal., 
quarterly, li^ per cent, first preferred; quarterly, 1% per 
cent, original preferred. 

Philadelphia Company, Pittsburgh, Pa., 2% per cent, pre- 
ferred. 



(ELECTRIC RAILWAY MONTHLY EARNINGS 
' BERKSHIRE STREET RAILWAY, PITTSPIELD, MASS. 



Period 
Im., Dec, 
1 " 
6 •• 



Gross Operating Net Fixed Net 

Earnings Expenses Earnings Charges Surplus 

'14 $76,639 •$67,046 $9,593 $17,385 tt$7,697 

•13 76,164 •71,253 4,911 15,523 ttl0,528 

•14 524,025 •466,938 57,087 103,306 tJ45,304 

•13 541,338 •450,954 90,384 90,881 t + 369 



CONNECTICUT COMPANY, NEW HAVEN, CONN. 

Im., Dec, 14 $630,642 •$446,564 $184,078 $97,462 ±$108,479 

1 " '13 631,963 ^472,854 159,109 88,374 ±93,076 

S " '14 4,192,386 •3,097,200 1,095,186 589,707 ±635,637 

6 13 4,282,333 •3,113,432 1,168,902 537,153 t763,728 

NEW Y'ORK & STAMFORD RAILWAY, PORT CHESTER, N. Y. 



Im., Dec, '14 

1 13 

6" " '14 
6 13 



$24,466 

24,879 

214,808 

210,133 



•$23,590 

•23,759 

•161,924 

•155,594 



$876 

1,120 

52,884 

54,538 



$7,876 tt$6,9S0 

7,726 tt6,580 

47,254 tt5,902 

46,092 t1:8,733 



NEW Y'ORK, WESTCHESTER & BOSTON RAILWAY, 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 

Im., Dec, '14 $38,043 ^$45,618 t$7,575 $6,878 tt$14,383 

1 " '13 34,173 •47,705 tl3,532 4,976 ttl8 073 

^ '14 225,116 •261,352 t36,236 36,886 tt72,386 

^5 13 205,185 •296,005 t90,820 31,550 1*119,763 

RHODE ISLAND COMPANY, PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

Im., Dec, '14 $411,509 •$314,187 $97,323 $117,308 tt$18,337 

1 . " '13 424,554 ^327, 952 96,603 107,589 ttlO,255 

5 " '14 2,788,017 •2,038,480 749,537 709,108 ±78,440 

6 " '13 2,833,670 •2,021,454 812,217 638,467 1235,365 

WESTCHESTER STREET RAILWAY, WHITE PLAINS, N. Y. 



Im., 
1 
6 
6 



Dec, 



'14 
'13 
'14 
•13 



$18,421 

19,334 

141,806 

137,008 



•$21,922 

•20,154 
•138,562 
•128,466 



$3,501 

821 

3,244 

8,543 



$1,312 tt$4,807 

1,137 tn,944 

7,537 tt4,219 

6,417 tt2,273 



'Includes taxes. tDeflcit. Jlncludes other income. 



Traffic and Transportation 

THE "JITNEY" BUS 

Failure of Original Los Angeles Company — Jitney Idea 

Still Spreading — Notes Regarding New Regulatory 

Measures and Services Discontinued 

A weird series of developments presents itself for record 
this week in connection with the "jitney." That the theory 
of the small profit and the quick turn-over in connection 
with the large bus has been carried to excess in one case at 
least is instanced by the news from Los Angeles that the 
Pacific Motor Coach Company of that city has filed a volun- 
tary petition in bankruptcy in the United States Court. 
Insolvency proceedings had been previously instituted. The 
schedule of assets and liabilities shows the total indebted- 
ness of the short-lived corporation amounts to $86,788. This 
includes a claim for thirty-three double-deck motor buses 
and one 2-ton fuel wagon. An aggregate of $1,729 is due 
employees for wages. The assets of the company are 
scheduled at $3,026. This company is not to be confused 
with any of the "jitney" bus associations, and was, in fact, 
hastened into bankruptcy by the diversion of such traffic as 
it at first enjoyed to the more speedy "jitney." 

The idea of the "jitney" is still spreading. Two of the 
most important cities to be invaded are Toledo and Louis- 
ville. On Feb. 2 "jitney" service was started in Toledo, in 
competition with the Cherry Street line of the Toledo Rail- 
ways & Light Company. In an address before the Toledo 
Automobile Association on the day the bus was started, 
F. R. Coates, president of the Toledo Railways & Light 
Company, said that the operation of the "jitney" will teach 
the people that a ride is worth 5 cents and in that way 
benefit the local railway. 

In the case of Louisville, a charter has been filed in the 
county court there by the Nickel Automobile Company, with 
an authorized capital of $10,000. The incorporators an- 
nounce that they will have lines of specially designed motor 
buses, each capable of hauling ten or fifteen passengers, and 
that they will ply between residence districts and the busi- 
ness section. Close on the heels of this project comes the 
announcement that other similar companies are in process 
of formation. William P. McDonough, attorney and secre- 
tary of the Louisville Retail Grocers' Association; Louis C. 
Heck, Jr., attorney; Stephen S. Jones, attorney, and William 
A. Baker, real estate man, are incorporators of the first 
company. J. S. Roberts, formerly with the Overland Auto- 
mobile Agency, is promoting another company, while R. M. 
Cunningham, a lumberman with offices in the Inter-South- 
ern Building, Louisville, is interested in organizing a third 
venture. It is stated the first of the Nickel Company's 
vehicles will be put on the streets some time in March, while 
it is declared by promoters of other venture that they will 
begin service immeditely. Officials of the Louisville Railway 
have declined to discuss the development. 

H. M. Byllesby & Company, Chicago, 111., report that two 
days' operation of "jitney" buses at Fort Smith convinced an 
auto-livery concern of that city that such competition with 
the street cars would not be profitable and the buses have 
been discontinued. The "jitney" line was started on the 
principal traffic artery of the city, and a ten-minute service 
with 5-cent fare was announced to the public in newspaper 
advertisements. 

It is reported from Phoenix, Ariz., that the twelve cars 
which were started there in "jitney" service have been 
ordered to suspend operations by the Mayor. The service 
was installed in December. The city asked a license of $60 
a year from the operators of the service and a $2,000 bond 
on each car. The owners of the service were censured 
severely by the city officials for allowing the passengers to 
ride on the steps of the cars and were finally forced to 
suspend. 

On Feb. 2 the Board of Commissioners of Oklahoma City 
passed an ordinance regulating the "jitneys," and on the 
same day the Mayor signed the measure. This measure 
provides among other thing that all vehicles called "jitneys" 
must file an application with the city clerk stating the type 
of ear, horse power, factory number, seating capacity, name 
of chauffeur, terminals, hours of operation, file a bond of 



354 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[Vol. XLV, No. 7 



$10,000, pay an annual fee of $50 for each eight-passenger 
vehicle, $75 for each vehicle seating more than eight pas- 
sengers, and $150 for each seating more than twelve pas- 
sengers. Specifications are set out for signs to be carried 
and speed limits are fixed. It is made unlawful for "jitneys" 
to operate longitudinally upon any street occupied by a 
street car line, except that within the fire limits the vehicles 
may operate for not more than two blocks in one direction 
along such streets where necessary in crossing such fire 
limits. 

The "jitney" did not make any large inroads on the re- 
ceipts of the Oklahoma Railway. On Feb. 5 they were still 
plying their service, however, but there was a marked fall- 
ing off in the number of vehicles running. At no time does 
it seem that they made anything like their expenses. 

An ordinance is pending in Spokane to require "jitney" 
operators to file a bond of $5,000 and in addition pay an 
annual tax ranging from $25 to $100 a year. 

The ordinance enacted by the City Commissioners of Den- 
ver to regulate the "jitney" was passed by a vote of four 
to one. An emergency clause was attached which made it 
effective immediately without having to wait the usual 
thirty days. The ordinance provides in short that it shall 
be unlawful to operate an automobile or other vehicle for 
hire without first securing a franchise and that violations 
of the ordinance shall be punishable by a fine of not less 
than $100 nor more than $300 or by imprisonment for not 
more than ninety days, or both. Every trip is to constitute 
a separate offense. 

On Jan. 29 the City Council of Corpus Christi, Tex., 
took prompt measures to regulate the operation of "jitney" 
cars, when under the emergency clause an ordinance was 
passed requiring that any person, firm or corporation oper- 
ating a "jitney" line must first secure a franchise from the 
city. In addition the ordinance provides that the applicant 
shall also furnish to the city a bond in a sufficient amount 
to guarantee the payment of any claims that arise as a 
result of damages, and that "any person injured by a 'jitney' 
car may sue the bondsmen." 

In regard to the effort to regulate the "jitney" in 
Birmingham the Herald of that city said recently: "Dis- 
agreement among the members of the city commission over 
the provisions of the proposed ordinance to regulate the 
'jitney' auto lines of the city has temporarily at least held 
up the new law, and in all probability has killed it. The 
proposed ordinance provided for a $2000 indemnity bond 
to be placed on each company operating cars and a license 
to be charged for each car in operation of probably $15 or 
$20. A very authentic report was to the effect that counsel 
for the Birmingham Railway, Light & Power Company 
has prepared an ordinance for the regulation of the 'jitney' 
autos, but which was not accepted by the commission be- 
cause it was in some ways too drastic." 

The City Council of. Portland, Ore., has authorized Com- 
missioner Daly to proceed at once with the formulation of 
legislation to govern the operation of "jitney" buses in that 
city. Mr. Daly hopes to report by Feb. 15. 

Two hundred thousand little "missionaries" are to be 
sent out by the San Antonio (Tex.) Traction Company in 
the interest of public patronage of the street railway. The 
"missionaries" are in the form of "stickers" printed in blue, 
yellow, green and red, with this caption: "The Traction 
Company Has Helped Build San Antonio — Use the Street 
Gars." A picture of one of the modern steel cars operated 
by the company, as a background for a small mule car of 
the type used when the public carrier service first was 
established, is shown on the stamps. Printed under the 
drawing is: "1881-1915." 

Automobile Topics seems to see the hand of the Standard 
Oil behind the "jitney" development. That paper says: 
"One of the most extensive fields of influence that the auto- 
mobile industry has yet encountered lies in the 'jitney' bus. 
No less than a revolution has been effected in the used car 
market; the Standard Oil Company, seeing large increases 
in gasoline sales, is throwing its influence in favor of the 
movement; the leading tire companies are contemplating 
the strongest possible support for the promoters and oper- 
ators of 'jitney' lines; and traction interests are concerned 
lest the values of their street railroad securities be impaired 
by traffic losses occasioned by the new competitors." 



The Dallas Dispatch, Dallas, Tex., is offering prizes of 
$2 for best jingles about the "jitney." Here are a few of 
the gems published by that paper: 

Hush, little Ford, 

Don't you cry. 
You will be a "jitney" 

Bye and bye. 

"Jitney" means a nickel, 

A nickel means a ride. 
If the "jitney" hadn't come along, 

I suppose I would 'a' died. 

If the "jitneys" jar and jingle like 

The "jitney" jingles jar. 
You can't blame a single human for 

Preferring the trolley car. 

The Fort Worth Telegram has also gone in for "jitney" 
jingles. There appeared in that paper recently the fol- 
lowing: 

Oh you "jitney"! 

You give me a pain; 
I rode in you once. 
But never again. 

If a street car meets a "jitney" 

Coming down the lane. 
And the street car hits the "jitney," 

I wonder who's to blame. 

The trolleys are bad. 

The "jitneys" are worse; 
I always walk, 

Safety first. 



ATLANTA SERVICE DECISION 



Synopsis of Georgia Railroad Commission's Decision Deals 
Interestingly with Seating Capacity 

The Georgia Railway & Power Company, Atlanta, Ga., 
asked the Georgia Railroad Commission recently for author- 
ity to discontinue certain tripper or extra cars among the 
number operated in its system during rush hours, its posi- 
tion being that traflfic had fallen off on the lines involved 
to an extent justifying the withdrawal of services not 
needed. The commission's decision, referred to very briefly 
in the Electric Railway Journal of Feb. 6, was against 
the company in all but three counts and was partially favor- 
able in some four others. The synopsis of the decision of 
the commission contains one or two interesting points, par- 
ticularly that which the commission makes as to the num- 
ber of passengers above seating capacity that are allowable 
under abnormal conditions at rush hours. The commission 
said in part: 

"While it is reasonable and wholly probable that during 
December, 1914, there was a smaller volume of traffic than 
during rush hours in 1913, the commission is of the opinion, 
from many considerations, that this decrease has been rela- 
tively smaller than in non-rush hours. Granting, however, 
that the rush-hour traffic is reduced under 1913, the com- 
mission is not inclined to agree with the assumption that 
the facilities supplied during these periods in 1913 were 
entirely adequate on every route. On some routes we feel 
sure they were not, and in making this statement the com- 
mission does not base it upon the contention that every pas- 
senger on every car operated should be furnished a seat. 
This contention may be sound in theory. Under street car 
traffic conditions as they exist daily, such a theory is fre- 
quently impossible of actual operation. 

"In our opinion it is the duty of the common carrier to 
provide seats, that is, reasonable accommodations, in its cars 
for such patrons as desire them, in so far as they can 
reasonably anticipate and measure the volume of traflic 
which will offer. Experience shows that there is, with fair 
regularity, an estimable volume of traffic during certain 
hours of the day. This should be provided for. But this 



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ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



355 



does not mean that if an average of forty passengers cus- 
tomarily board a given schedule car on a certain route upon 
which is operated a forty-seat car, the car is then loaded to 
its reasonable capacity, and that when forty-one passengers 
begin to ride additional facilities must be provided. 

"Careful observation has shown that an appreciable per- 
centage of regular street car patrons prefer riding on the 
platforms to occupying seats inside the cars. These are 
styled 'voluntary standees.' Again, it must be borne in 
mind that city street car transportation is generally for 
comparatively short distances. A given route we will say is 
5 miles long; cars are operated regularly the entire distance 
of the route. At an ascertained peak point, where the load 
is always heaviest, a forty-seat car will customarily have 
on board, say, forty-eight passengers. This maximum was 
only reached one block back. At the next block forward 
the car begins to discharge its load, and within two or three 
blocks the load is again below the seating capacity, no one 
having stood for a longer distance than three or four blocks 
or for a longer time than five or ten minutes. This par- 
ticular schedule may have been — and observation demon- 
strates this — the only one at all overloaded during the whole 
day. Conditions frequently arise in street car traffic when 
it is impossible to avoid overloading for short distances or 
for short periods of time. 

"Taking into consideration such conditions some commis- 
sions have held that facilities are fairly reasonable where 
the peak point loads do not exceed 30 per cent of the seat- 
ing capacity offered for a continuous period of thirty or 
forty minutes. In our opinion, an allowance of 30 per cent 
over the seating capacity for standees, whether voluntary 
or involuntary, is too large. We are rather inclined to 
allow only 20 per cent on this account, to be extended not 
longer than thirty minutes with schedules operated or not 
exceeding ten-minute headway. It would not be reasonable 
to apply this rule to only one day's travel, or even a week's. 
The congestion should extend over such a reasonable period 
as would show that it is regular and not spasmodic; that it 
is permanent in nature and not due to temporary conditions. 
It would be unreasonable to require a carrier to operate suf- 
ficient cars to provide a seat for every passenger on every 
schedule or every day of every year and for every distance. 
Moreover, it is impossible even if the public would render the 
absolutely necessary co-operation in distributing the loads as 
between the cars offering. 

"We have deemed it advisable to submit the foregoing 
general observations in order that the public may be re- 
minded that the carrier is only required by law to supply 
reasonably adequate and comfortable facilities. It is the 
province of the commission to compel this reasonably ade- 
quate and efficient service. If at any time or upon any 
route there are shown to be facilities and service in excess 
of the reasonable needs of the public, it is just as much our 
duty to allow a reasonable reduction of this excess as to 
i order more cars when service is shown to be inadequate. 
In the pending application our conclusions and action are 
based upon such facts as we have found to exist." 



633 the conductors' examination. Those who passed success- 
fully were then listed in the order of the written examina- 
tion percentage made, and the first ninety men in each of 
the two lists were employed. 



SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINATION RESULTS 



Instructing Ninety New Crews in Twenty Days on San 
Francisco Municipal Line 

When the Panama-Pacific Exposition opens on Feb. 20, 
the Municipal Railways of San Francisco plans to add 
ninety new cars to the number now in service, and the 
motormen and conductors who will be employed were 
selected from the Civil Service Commission eligible lists in 
time to allow twenty days for instruction, as most of the 
new men are without experience. The Civil Service Com- 
mission, working in conjunction with Thomas A. Cashin, 
superintendent of the Municipal Railway, some months ago 
planned the general nature of the examination and results 
, have been highly satisfactory, it is now reported. The ex- 
amination consisted of two parts, physical and written, and 
i applicants who failed to pass in the first were not allowed 
', to take the second. The physical tests were considered 
j rather severe, and although about 3000 men made applica- 
I tions only 711 took the written part of the examination 
for motormen, and 798 the written examination for conduc- 
tors. Of these, 554 passed the motormen's examination and 



New Freight Service. — The Pacific Electric Railway, Los 
Angeles, Cal., has begun a freight service between San 
Bernardino, Los Angeles and way stations. 

Increase in Fare. — The Cumberland & Westernport Elec- 
tric Railway, Cumberland, Md., has increased the price of 
books of one hundred tickets good over its lines from $4 
to $4.50. The cash fere remains at 5 cents in each zone. 

Fare Hearing Continued. — The hearing in connection with 
the fare complaint against the Public Service Railway, New- 
ark, N. J., by representatives of Gloucester City, Woodbury 
and other towns will be continued before the Board of 
Public Utilities Commissioners on Feb. 23 at Trenton. 

Hitching Sleds to One-Man Cars. — Instructions have been 
issued to the city police force of Regina, Saskatchewan, to 
take vigorous measures to suppress the practice indulged in 
by youths of the city of tying their sleds to the cars of the 
Regina Municipal Railway. One-man cars are operated. 

Rounding Up Deaf Teamsters. — The Metropolitan Street 
Railway, Kansas City, Mo., has this order posted in the 
carhouses: "Conductors and motormen will obtain the names 
of all wagons which remain on the tracks after sounding 
the gongs and report the same to the division superinten- 
dents." 

Ventilation in Louisville. — Instructions to conductors of 
the Louisville (Ky.) Railway provide that at all times two 
of the ventilators in the cars shall be kept open. This is the 
answer of the company to the agitation of the question of 
street car ventilation in which certain Louisville newspapers 
and the city health authorities have been indulging. 

I. T. S. Reduction in Fare. — The Illinois Traction System, 
Peoria, 111., has announced reduced passenger tariffs between 
Blooming-ton, Peoria and St. Louis, claiming a differential 
over steam lines. The old round-trip rate from Bloomington 
to St. Louis was $5.30; the new rate is $5; the old rate, 
round trip, Peoria to St. Louis, $5.50; new rate, $5.30; old 
rate, round trip, Springfield to St. Louis, $3.10; new, $2.80. 

E. R. Kelsey Wins in Membership Contest. — .A member- 
ship contest for the Young Men's Christian Association at 
Toledo, Ohio, ended on Jan. 28. Two teams were organized 
and christened the "Electrics" and the "Steams." E. R. 
Kelsey, publicity manager of the Toledo Railways & Light 
Company, captained the "Electrics" and Hugh Campbell, the 
"Steams." The object was to increase the membership by 
at least 300. Mr. Kelsey's team won with 185, while Mr, 
Campbell's team secured 130. 

Hearing Regarding Trailers. — The Public Utilities Com- 
mission of the District of Columbia will hold a formal 
hearing on Feb. 16 to consider the application of the 
Capital Traction Company with respect to Section 13 of 
order No. 21 regulating the operation and equipment of 
cars in the District of Columbia. Section 13 provides that 
no trail car shall be operated for the purpose of carrying 
passengers unless a separate conductor or an employee act- 
ing as such is provided for each car of the train. 

New Fare on Schenectady Railway. — Local round-trip 
tickets good until used for transportation between Stop 19, 
or any stop between Stop 19 and Stop 14%, inclusive, and 
Schenectady, or for transportation between Stop 19, or any 
stop between Stop 19 and Stop 22%, inclusive, and Albany, 
will be sold in the Schenectady and Albany terminals and 
at a convenient place in the vicinity of Stop 19 at 25 cents a 
ticket. This is a new fare established under order of the 
Public Service Commission in cases Nos. 4545 and 4587 and 
will go into effect on March 1, 1915. 

Action on "Jim Crow" Bill Postponed. — The House by a 
vote of 168 to 107 has decided not to take up, for the pres- 
ent, the bill introduced by Representative Clark, of Florida, 
providing for the operation of "Jim Crow" cars on the elec- 
tric railways in the District of Columbia. The Clark bill 
was introduced in the House on April 7, 1913. After lying 
dormant for almost two years, it was suddenly revived 
on Feb. 2, 1915, when it was ordered reported to the House. 
It is possible for this legislation to come up on Feb. 22, or 



356 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



[VOL. XLV, No. 7 



by a special agreement among the House leaders on some 
other day. 

Accident on New York Elevated. — Nine persons were in- 
jured in an accident on the Manhattan Elevated Railway, at 
8:37 a. m. on Feb. 6, when a south-bound Ninth Avenue 
local train crashed into the rear car of a local-express 
that was halted at the Fiftieth Street station. After the 
collision a short circuit started a fire in the wrecked rear 
car of the local express and the first car of the local, which 
had telescoped each other by the force of the collision. 
The immediate effect of the accident was to suspend all 
traffic on the Sixth Avenue elevated line, the trains of 
which turn into Ninth Avenue through Fifty-third Street. 

Brooklyn Transfer Order. — The Public Service Com- 
mission for the First District of New York has rescinded 
an order adopted in November last and adopted three new 
orders, requiring the Van Brunt Street & Erie Basin Rail- 
road to exchange transfers with the intersecting lines of 
the Coney Island & Brooklyn Railroad, the Brooklyn Heights 
Railroad and the Nassau Electric Railroad at Hamilton 
Avenue. The order directs the companies to agree between 
them as to the portion of the 5-cent fare to which each 
shall be entitled by Feb. 10, 1915, and to report to the com- 
mission upon Feb. 11 whether such an agreement has been 
reached, so that the commission may apportion the joint 
rate if the companies fail to agree. 

Motorman Not Entitled to Engineer's Pay. — In the hear- 
ing before the Railroad Board of Arbitration, which is con- 
sidering the demand of engineers and firemen of the West- 
ern district for an increase in wages, R. E. Hewitt, general 
foreman of electric car shops. Southern Pacific Company, 
West Alameda, Cal., stated that motormen on electrified 
steam roads are not entitled to the wages of the locomotive 
engineer. Mr. Hewitt is quoted as saying: "The only thing 
the motorman has to do is to lift his kit of tools into the cab 
and to see that he has a supply of fuses. Everything has 
been made ready for him before the motor leaves the shop. 
The employees have dubbed the motor 'the dead man's out- 
fit,' and the motormen certainly are not entitled to an engi- 
neer's wages." 

Ambulance Chaser Fined at Boston. — The first case to be 
brought at Boston, Mass., under the so-called ambulance- 
chaser law (Chap. 432) of 1914 has resulted in the convic- 
tion of Harry Noonan and the imposition of a fine of $100 
for soliciting a claim in a damage case against the Boston 
Elevated Railway. The act provides penalties for disbarred 
attorneys and also includes in its prohibition any person 
not having been admitted to the bar who represents him- 
self as having authority in behalf of persons having claims 
for damages to procure settlements for such claims, oi 
whoever, not being an attorney, solicits either for himself 
or for another the management and control of such claims. 
The maximum penalty for the first offense is a fine of $100 
or six months' imprisonment and for each subsequent 
offense a fine of $500 or imprisonment of one year. 

Accident Figures for Detroit. — During 1914 a total of 
16,331 accident reports were filed with the Detroit (Mich.) 
United Railway as against 17,938 the year before, a reduc- 
iton of 9 per cent. The records of the company show that 
while 4142 cars were in collision in 1913 this number was 
cut down to 2343 in 1914, a reduction of 43 per cent. There 
was a decrease of 11 per cent in derailment of cars, an 
increase from seventy-one to eighty reports on running 
into open switch points, while there was a decrease of 47 
per cent in running over street and steam railroad cross- 
ings. In 1913 there were 2595 reports on passengers hurt 
in boarding or alighting from cars, while last year this 
was cut to' 2143, a reduction of 17 per cent. In reports on 
falling from cars, mostly moving, there was a reduction 
from 304 in 1913 to 191 in 1914, or 37 per cent. There was 
an increase from 248 to 309 in reports of passengers hurt 
while within the body of the car. In 1913 there were 3210 
automobile collisions with cars on the Detroit United Lines, 
mostly within the one-fare zone. In 1914 this class of acci- 
dent reports increased to 4072. This is an increase of 27 
per cent, with more than eleven automobiles struck every 
day. The worst month of all was December, when 491 
automobiles were struck, an average of sixteen a day. "The 
company says: "Let us have some 'safety first' operation 
among the automobile drivers." 



Personal Mention 

Mr. C. E. Brown has succeeded Mr. J. H. Hornung as 
manager of the San Francisco, Napa & Calistoga Railway 
and will make his headquarters at Napa, Cal. 

Mr. H. E. Blain has been appointed operating manager of 
the Metropolitan District Railway, London Electric Railway, 
City & South London Railway and Central London Railway, 
London, England. 

Mr. Frederick L. Siddons has been appointed an associate 
justice of the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia 
and has been succeeded as a member of the Public Utilities 
Commission by Mr. Louis Brownlow. 

Mr. J. M. Nelson has resigned as chief engineer of the 
power station of the Houghton County Traction Company, 
Houghton, Mich., to become connected with the Standard 
Oil Company as a traveling engineer. 

Mr. Z. E. Knapp has been appointed manager of mainte- 
nance and construction of the Metropolitan District Railway, 
London Electric Railway, City & South London Railway and 
the Central London Railway, London, England. 

Mr. J. P. Thomas has been appointed general superinten- 
dent to the London (England) General Omnibus Company, 
Ltd., and in this capacity will have charge of all the work 
of operation, under the general control of Mr. H. E. Blain, 
operating manager. 

Mr. W. E. Mandelick, in addition to his office as secretary 
to the Metropolitan District Railway, London Electric Rail- 
way Company, City & South London Railway and the Cen- 
tral London Railway, London, England, has been appointed 
business manager of the companies. 

Mr. W. E. Blake, in addition to his position as superin- 
tendent of the line to the District Railway, has been ap- 
pointed superintendent of the line to the London Electric 
Railway, City & South London Railway and Central London 
Railways, in place of Mr. J. P. Thomas, who has resigned 
from these companies to become general superintendent of 
the London General Omnibus Company, Ltd. 

OBITUARY 

G. Benz, director of the Gesellschaft fiir den Bau von 
Untergrundbahnen (Underground • Railways Construction 
Company, Berlin, Germany), is reported killed in battle. 
Mr. Benz had previously received the iron cross for valor. 

James F. McElroy, president of the Consolidated Car Heat- 
ing Company, Albany, N. Y., died at Laconia, N. H., on Feb. 
10. Mr. McElroy was born in Greenfield, Ohio, Nov. 25, 1852, 
and was graduated from Dartmouth College in 1876. For 
four years following Mr. McElroy was the principal teacher 
cf the Indianapolis Institution for the Blind, and then for 
seven years was superintendent of the Michigan Institution 
for the Blind. In 1887 he organized the McElroy Car Heat- 
ing Company. Two years later it was combined with the 
Sewall Car Heating Company. 

Norman B. Ream, capitalist, died in New York on Feb. 9. 
Mr. Ream was born in Somerset County, Pa., on Nov. 15, 
1844. At the age of fourteen he became a teacher, and in 
1861 enlisted as a private in the Union army. He was 
wounded in a battle near Savannah and returned from the 
war a commissioned officer. He then clerked for awhile in 
Pennsylvania, but in 1866 opened a general store in Prince- 
ton, 111. The following year he moved to Osceola, la., in- 
creasing the line of goods handled. In 1871 he moved to 
Chicago and engaged in the commission business. He 
prospered immensely and was a member of the famous big 
four which included N. S. Jones, John Cudahy and Sidney 
A. Kent. Mr. Ream had made his headquarters in New 
York for many years. He was connected with many cor- 
porations as an officer or director, among them the follow- 
ing: Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, Brooklyn Heights Rail- 
road, Brooklyn Rapid Transit Company, Chicago & Erie 
Railroad, Chicago & Alton Railroad, Chicago, Burlington & 
Quincy Railroad, Erie Railroad, International Harvester 
Company, National Biscuit Company, New York, Susquehan- 
na & Western Railroad, Pennsylvania Coal Company, Pull- 
man Company, Seaboard Air Line Railway, United States 
Steel Corporation. 



I 



February 13, 1915] 



ELECTRIC RAILWAY JOURNAL 



357 



Construction News 

Constructio